git.vger.kernel.org archive mirror
 help / color / mirror / Atom feed
* What's cooking in git.git (Jun 2013, #02; Tue, 4)
@ 2013-06-04 23:45 Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-05  0:04 ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-05  6:59 ` What's cooking in git.git (Jun 2013, #02; Tue, 4) Johannes Sixt
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-04 23:45 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: git

Here are the topics that have been cooking.  Commits prefixed with
'-' are only in 'pu' (proposed updates) while commits prefixed with
'+' are in 'next'.

We are in the post-1.8.3 cycle.  As promised, 'next' has been
rewound. A few stalled topics have been ejected and bunch of new
topics that have been cooking are now in it.  I expect these on
'next' to graduate to 'master' soonish, as I picked relatively easy
ones in this round.

You can find the changes described here in the integration branches
of the repositories listed at

    http://git-blame.blogspot.com/p/git-public-repositories.html

--------------------------------------------------
[Graduated to "master"]

* kb/status-ignored-optim-2 (2013-06-02) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-02 at 88ee588)
 + dir.c: fix ignore processing within not-ignored directories

 Fix 1.8.3 regressions in the .gitignore path exclusion logic.

--------------------------------------------------
[New Topics]

* ar/wildmatch-foldcase (2013-06-02) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at 3180bcc)
 + wildmatch: properly fold case everywhere

 The wildmatch engine did not honor WM_CASEFOLD option correctly.

 Will merge to 'master'.

* cr/git-work-tree-sans-git-dir (2013-06-03) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at bebedca)
 + git.txt: remove stale comment regarding GIT_WORK_TREE

 These days, "git --work-tree=there cmd" without specifying an
 explicit --git-dir=here will do the usual discovery, but we had a
 description of older behaviour in the documentation.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* fc/do-not-use-the-index-in-add-to-index (2013-06-03) 2 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at 94e7b60)
 + read-cache: trivial style cleanups
 + read-cache: fix wrong 'the_index' usage

 Will merge to 'master'.


* fc/sequencer-skip-quiet (2013-06-03) 8 commits
 - revert/cherry-pick: add --skip option
 - revert/cherry-pick: add --quiet option
 - sequencer: run post-rewrite hook
 - cherry-pick: store rewritten commits
 - SQUASH???
 - cherry-pick: add --skip-empty option
 - sequencer: trivial fix
 - sequencer: remove useless indentation

 I think the post-rewrite hook should not apply to revert, and
 revert should be taught about --skip-empty.  The "copy-notes"
 change was nak'ed, and I agree with Thomas that the external
 interface to the mechanism should be aligned with existing
 notes.rewrite.<command>.

 Waiting for a reroll.

 $gmane/225676, $gmane/226263, $gmane/226271


* js/test-ln-s-add (2013-06-02) 11 commits
 - t6035: use test_ln_s_add to remove SYMLINKS prerequisite
 - t3509, t4023, t4114: use test_ln_s_add to remove SYMLINKS prerequisite
 - t3100: use test_ln_s_add to remove SYMLINKS prerequisite
 - t3030: use test_ln_s_add to remove SYMLINKS prerequisite
 - t2100: use test_ln_s_add to remove SYMLINKS prerequisite
 - t0000: use test_ln_s_add to remove SYMLINKS prerequisite
 - tests: use test_ln_s_add to remove SYMLINKS prerequisite (trivial cases)
 - tests: introduce test_ln_s and test_ln_s_add
 - t3010: modernize style
 - t2100: modernize style and unroll a loop of test cases
 - test-chmtime: Fix exit code on Windows

 Many tests that check the behaviour of symbolic links stored in the
 index or the tree objects do not have to be skipped on a filesystem
 that lack symbolic link support.

 There seem to be some misconversion, mostly around the use of the
 new test_ln_s helper.

 Waiting for responses to reviews.
 $gmane/226417 and others.


* mt/send-email-cc-match-fix (2013-06-03) 6 commits
 - t/send-email: test suppress-cc=self with non-ascii
 - t/send-email: add test with quoted sender
 - send-email: make --suppress-cc=self sanitize input
 - t/send-email: test suppress-cc=self on cccmd
 - send-email: fix suppress-cc=self on cccmd
 - t/send-email.sh: add test for suppress-cc=self

 It may want to have an additional test case for --from='"A U. Thor"
 <author@example.xz>' to make sure we do not doubly escape what is
 already escaped.

 Some changes in patch 2/6 and a later patch may need to be flipped
 around.


* rr/complete-difftool (2013-06-03) 2 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at 01c7611)
 + completion: clarify ls-tree, archive, show completion
 + completion: difftool takes both revs and files

 Update command line completion (in contrib/) to use a better named
 completion helper function for commands that take revisions and
 paths.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* rr/diffcore-pickaxe-doc (2013-06-03) 2 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at 67d1fc7)
 + diffcore-pickaxe doc: document -S and -G properly
 + diffcore-pickaxe: make error messages more consistent

 Update the low-level diffcore documentation on -S/-G and --pickaxe-all.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* tr/sha1-file-silence-loose-object-info-under-prune-race (2013-06-03) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at e891bb8)
 + sha1_file: silence sha1_loose_object_info

 Will merge to 'master'.


* bp/mediawiki-credential (2013-06-04) 1 commit
 - git-remote-mediawiki: use git.pm functions for credentials

 The bridge to MediaWiki has been updated to use the credential
 helper interface in Git.pm, losing its own and the original
 implementation the former was based on.

 Minor review comments sent.


* mz/rebase-tests (2013-06-03) 7 commits
 - tests: move test for rebase messages from t3400 to t3406
 - t3406: modernize style
 - add tests for rebasing merged history
 - add tests for rebasing root
 - add tests for rebasing of empty commits
 - add tests for rebasing with patch-equivalence present
 - add simple tests of consistency across rebase types

--------------------------------------------------
[Stalled]

* mg/more-textconv (2013-05-10) 7 commits
 - grep: honor --textconv for the case rev:path
 - grep: allow to use textconv filters
 - t7008: demonstrate behavior of grep with textconv
 - cat-file: do not die on --textconv without textconv filters
 - show: honor --textconv for blobs
 - diff_opt: track whether flags have been set explicitly
 - t4030: demonstrate behavior of show with textconv

 Make "git grep" and "git show" pay attention to --textconv when
 dealing with blob objects.

 I thought this was pretty well designed and executed, but it seems
 there are some doubts on the list; kicking back to 'pu'.


* mh/multimail (2013-04-21) 1 commit
 - git-multimail: a replacement for post-receive-email

 Waiting for the initial history to pull from.
 $gmane/223564


* jc/format-patch (2013-04-22) 2 commits
 - format-patch: --inline-single
 - format-patch: rename "no_inline" field

 A new option to send a single patch to the standard output to be
 appended at the bottom of a message.  I personally have no need for
 this, but it was easy enough to cobble together.  Tests, docs and
 stripping out more MIMEy stuff are left as exercises to interested
 parties.

 Not ready for inclusion.

 Will discard unless we hear from anybody who is interested in
 tying its loose ends.


* jk/gitweb-utf8 (2013-04-08) 4 commits
 - gitweb: Fix broken blob action parameters on blob/commitdiff pages
 - gitweb: Don't append ';js=(0|1)' to external links
 - gitweb: Make feed title valid utf8
 - gitweb: Fix utf8 encoding for blob_plain, blobdiff_plain, commitdiff_plain, and patch

 Various fixes to gitweb.

 Drew Northup volunteered to take a look into this.
 $gmane/226216


* jk/commit-info-slab (2013-04-19) 3 commits
 - commit-slab: introduce a macro to define a slab for new type
 - commit-slab: avoid large realloc
 - commit: allow associating auxiliary info on-demand
 (this branch is used by jc/show-branch.)

 Technology demonstration to show a way we could use unbound number
 of flag bits on commit objects.


* jc/show-branch (2013-05-21) 5 commits
 - show-branch: use commit slab to represent bitflags of arbitrary width
 - show-branch.c: remove "all_mask"
 - show-branch.c: abstract out "flags" operation
 - show-branch.c: lift all_mask/all_revs to a global static
 - show-branch.c: update comment style
 (this branch uses jk/commit-info-slab.)

 Waiting for the final step to lift the hard-limit before sending it out.

--------------------------------------------------
[Cooking]

* fc/completion-less-ls-remote (2013-06-02) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 6624f0b)
 + completion: avoid ls-remote in certain scenarios

 Will merge to 'master'.


* jk/test-exit-code-by-signal (2013-06-02) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 25af892)
 + t0005: test git exit code from signal death

 Will merge to 'master'.


* nd/make-wildmatch-default (2013-06-02) 1 commit
 - Makefile: promote wildmatch to be the default fnmatch implementation

 Will merge to 'next'.


* rr/remove-contrib-some (2013-06-02) 1 commit
 - contrib: remove continuous/ and patches/

 Will merge to 'next'.


* rs/unpack-trees-plug-leak (2013-06-02) 7 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 97e7b6d)
 + unpack-trees: free cache_entry array members for merges
 + diff-lib, read-tree, unpack-trees: mark cache_entry array paramters const
 + diff-lib, read-tree, unpack-trees: mark cache_entry pointers const
 + unpack-trees: create working copy of merge entry in merged_entry
 + unpack-trees: factor out dup_entry
 + read-cache: mark cache_entry pointers const
 + cache: mark cache_entry pointers const

 Will merge to 'master'.


* tr/test-commit-only-on-orphan (2013-06-02) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at b1864fd)
 + Test 'commit --only' after 'checkout --orphan'

 Will merge to 'master'.


* ap/diff-ignore-blank-lines (2013-05-29) 1 commit
 - diff: add --ignore-blank-lines option

 "git diff" learned a mode that ignores hunks whose change consists
 only of additions and removals of blank lines, which is the same as
 "diff -B" (ignore blank lines) of GNU diff.

 Will be rerolled.
 $gmane/226394


* fc/show-branch-in-rebase-am (2013-05-29) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 176f6b7)
 + prompt: fix for simple rebase

 The bash prompt code (in contrib/) displayed the name of the branch
 being rebased when "rebase -i/-m/-p" modes are in use, but not the
 plain vanilla "rebase".

 Will merge to 'master'.


* ks/difftool-dir-diff-copy-fix (2013-05-29) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at ca0cae0)
 + difftool --dir-diff: allow changing any clean working tree file

 "difftool --dir-diff" did not copy back changes made by the
 end-user in the diff tool backend to the working tree in some
 cases.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* rr/push-head (2013-05-29) 3 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at ecd5be7)
 + push: make push.default = current use resolved HEAD
 + push: fail early with detached HEAD and current
 + push: factor out the detached HEAD error message

 "git push $there HEAD:branch" did not resolve HEAD early enough, so
 it was easy to flip it around while push is still going on and push
 out a branch that the user did not originally intended when the
 command was started.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* sb/archive-zip-double-assignment-fix (2013-05-29) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at c316eec)
 + archive-zip:write_zip_entry: Remove second reset of size variable to zero.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* rj/mingw-cygwin (2013-05-08) 2 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at 308fdb4)
 + cygwin: Remove the CYGWIN_V15_WIN32API build variable
 + mingw: rename WIN32 cpp macro to GIT_WINDOWS_NATIVE

 Update build for Cygwin 1.[57].  Torsten Bögershausen reports that
 this is fine with Cygwin 1.7 ($gmane/225824) so let's try moving it
 ahead.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* rr/rebase-autostash (2013-05-29) 7 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at 16f7c54)
 + rebase: implement --[no-]autostash and rebase.autostash
 + rebase --merge: return control to caller, for housekeeping
 + rebase -i: return control to caller, for housekeeping
 + am: return control to caller, for housekeeping
 + rebase: prepare to do generic housekeeping
 + rebase -i: don't error out if $state_dir already exists
 + am: tighten a conditional that checks for $dotest

 Will merge to 'master'.


* nd/urls-doc-no-file-hyperlink-fix (2013-05-24) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 54903b2)
 + urls.txt: avoid auto converting to hyperlink

 Will merge to 'master'.


* cb/log-follow-with-combined (2013-05-28) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at d5bf4f3)
 + fix segfault with git log -c --follow

 Will merge to 'master'.


* fc/cleanups (2013-05-28) 3 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 527cf93)
 + test: rebase: fix --interactive test
 + test: trivial cleanups
 + remote: trivial style cleanup

 Will merge to 'master'.


* fc/makefile (2013-05-26) 5 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at d1074e4)
 + build: do not install git-remote-testpy
 + build: add NO_INSTALL variable
 + build: cleanup using $<
 + build: cleanup using $^
 + build: trivial simplification
 (this branch is used by fc/remote-helpers-use-specified-python.)

 Will merge to 'master'.


* fc/remote-helpers-use-specified-python (2013-05-28) 4 commits
 - remote-helpers: add exec-path links
 - remote-helpers: allow direct test execution
 - remote-helpers: rename tests
 - remote-helpers: generate scripts
 (this branch uses fc/makefile.)

 I do not particularly think the second from the bottom is a good
 change, but it takes the remainder of the series hostage.

 Waiting for a reroll.


* fc/send-email-chainreplyto-warning (2013-05-28) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at e04764f)
 + send-email: remove warning about unset chainreplyto

 An overdue removal od "behaviour changed at 1.7.0; if you were
 living in a cave, here is what you can adjust to it" message.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* nd/prune-packed-dryrun-verbose (2013-05-28) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 3445b27)
 + prune-packed: avoid implying "1" is DRY_RUN in prune_packed_objects()

 Will merge to 'master'.


* rj/mingw-compat-st-mode-bits (2013-05-29) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 2efe84c)
 + path: Fix a sparse warning

 Will merge to 'master'.


* rs/commit-m-no-edit (2013-05-28) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 14329fa)
 + commit: don't start editor if empty message is given with -m

 "git commit --allow-empty-message -m ''" should not start an
 editor.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* xq/credential-osxkeychain (2013-05-28) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at a4ee0e0)
 + credential-osxkeychain: support more protocols

 Will merge to 'master'.


* jc/core-checkstat (2013-05-06) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 2166cb3)
 + deprecate core.statinfo at Git 2.0 boundary
 (this branch is used by jc/core-checkstat-2.0.)

 Will merge to 'master'.


* mh/reflife (2013-06-02) 25 commits
 - refs: document the lifetime of the args passed to each_ref_fn
 - register_ref(): make a copy of the bad reference SHA-1
 - exclude_existing(): set existing_refs.strdup_strings
 - string_list_add_refs_by_glob(): add a comment about memory management
 - string_list_add_one_ref(): rename first parameter to "refname"
 - show_head_ref(): rename first parameter to "refname"
 - show_head_ref(): do not shadow name of argument
 - add_existing(): do not retain a reference to sha1
 - do_fetch(): clean up existing_refs before exiting
 - do_fetch(): reduce scope of peer_item
 - object_array_entry: fix memory handling of the name field
 - find_first_merges(): remove unnecessary code
 - find_first_merges(): initialize merges variable using initializer
 - fsck: don't put a void*-shaped peg in a char*-shaped hole
 - object_array_remove_duplicates(): rewrite to reduce copying
 - revision: use object_array_filter() in implementation of gc_boundary()
 - object_array: add function object_array_filter()
 - revision: split some overly-long lines
 - cmd_diff(): make it obvious which cases are exclusive of each other
 - cmd_diff(): rename local variable "list" -> "entry"
 - cmd_diff(): use an object_array for holding trees
 - builtin_diff_tree(): make it obvious that function wants two entries
 - add_rev_cmdline(): make a copy of the name argument
 - fetch: make own copies of refnames
 - describe: make own copy of refname

 Define memory ownership and lifetime rules for what for-each-ref
 feeds to its callbacks (in short, "you do not own it, so make a
 copy if you want to keep it").

 Will merge to 'next'.


* th/bisect-skip-report-range-fix (2013-05-22) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 7bd4656)
 + bisect: Fix log output for multi-parent skip ranges

 Fix for an additional bisect log comments.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* mm/mediawiki-https-fail-message (2013-05-29) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at fb2671c)
 + git-remote-mediawiki: better error message when HTTP(S) access fails

 Hint users when https:// connection failed to check the
 certificate; it is a good hint if we assumie that it is common
 error for the end users to make.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* tg/maint-zsh-svn-remote-prompt (2013-05-22) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 32a45c0)
 + prompt: fix show upstream with svn and zsh

 zsh prompt script that borrowed from bash prompt script did not
 work due to slight differences in array variable notation between
 these two shells.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* tr/push-no-verify-doc (2013-05-23) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 01737d6)
 + Document push --no-verify

 "git push --[no-]verify" was not documented.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* dm/unbash-subtree (2013-05-21) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 2c9d2fb)
 + contrib/git-subtree: Use /bin/sh interpreter instead of /bin/bash

 It turns out that git-subtree script does not have to be run with
 bash.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* fc/transport-helper-no-refspec (2013-05-21) 2 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 8763bda)
 + transport-helper: check if the dry-run is supported
 + transport-helper: barf when user tries old:new

 With "export" remote-helper protocol, (1) a push that tries to
 update a remote ref whose name is different from the pushing side
 does not work yet, and (2) the helper may not know how to do
 --dry-run, so detect such problematic cases and disable them for
 now.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* rr/die-on-missing-upstream (2013-06-02) 2 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 00847ea)
 + sha1_name: fix error message for @{<N>}, @{<date>}
 + sha1_name: fix error message for @{u}

 When a reflog notation is used for implicit "current branch", we
 did not say which branch and worse said "branch ''".

 Will merge to 'master'.


* fc/remote-bzr (2013-05-28) 8 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at a603082)
 + remote-bzr: add fallback check for a partial clone
 + remote-bzr: reorganize the way 'wanted' works
 + remote-bzr: trivial cleanups
 + remote-bzr: change global repo
 + remote-bzr: delay cloning/pulling
 + remote-bzr: simplify get_remote_branch()
 + remote-bzr: fix for files with spaces
 + remote-bzr: recover from failed clones

 Will merge to 'master'.


* jx/clean-interactive (2013-06-03) 15 commits
 - test: add t7301 for git-clean--interactive
 - git-clean: add documentation for interactive git-clean
 - git-clean: add ask each interactive action
 - git-clean: add select by numbers interactive action
 - git-clean: add filter by pattern interactive action
 - git-clean: use a git-add-interactive compatible UI
 - git-clean: add colors to interactive git-clean
 - git-clean: show items of del_list in columns
 - git-clean: add support for -i/--interactive
 - git-clean: refactor git-clean into two phases
 - Refactor write_name_quoted_relative, remove unused params
 - Refactor quote_path_relative, remove unused params
 - quote.c: remove path_relative, use relative_path instead
 - path.c: refactor relative_path(), not only strip prefix
 - test: add test cases for relative_path


* tr/test-v-and-v-subtest-only (2013-05-16) 6 commits
 - test-lib: support running tests under valgrind in parallel
 - test-lib: allow prefixing a custom string before "ok N" etc.
 - test-lib: valgrind for only tests matching a pattern
 - test-lib: verbose mode for only tests matching a pattern
 - test-lib: refactor $GIT_SKIP_TESTS matching
 - test-lib: enable MALLOC_* for the actual tests

 Allows N instances of tests run in parallel, each running 1/N parts
 of the test suite under Valgrind, to speed things up.

 The tip one may be useful in practice but is a tad ugly ;-)

 There seem to be some miscounting by toggling the verbose/valgrind
 mode at wrong places?  Cf. $gmane/225735

 Waiting for a reroll.


* rr/zsh-color-prompt (2013-05-17) 3 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at d011a76)
 + prompt: colorize ZSH prompt
 + prompt: factor out gitstring coloring logic
 + prompt: introduce GIT_PS1_STATESEPARATOR

 Will merge to 'master'.


* fc/contrib-related (2013-06-03) 4 commits
 - contrib: related: parse committish like format-patch
 - contrib: related: add option to parse from committish
 - contrib: related: add support for multiple patches
 - Add new git-related helper to contrib

 Waiting for the design review to settle.


* fc/remote-hg (2013-05-28) 50 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at 9ee7dab)
 + remote-hg: add support for --force
 + remote-hg: add support for --dry-run
 + remote-hg: check if a fetch is needed
 + remote-hg: trivial cleanup
 + remote-helpers: improve marks usage
 + remote-hg: add check_push() helper
 + remote-hg: add setup_big_push() helper
 + remote-hg: remove files before modifications
 + remote-hg: improve lightweight tag author
 + remote-hg: use remote 'default' not local one
 + remote-hg: improve branch listing
 + remote-hg: simplify branch_tip()
 + remote-hg: check diverged bookmarks
 + remote-hg: pass around revision refs
 + remote-hg: implement custom checkheads()
 + remote-hg: implement custom push()
 + remote-hg: only update necessary revisions
 + remote-hg: force remote bookmark push selectively
 + remote-hg: reorganize bookmark handling
 + remote-hg: add test for failed double push
 + remote-hg: add test for big push
 + remote-hg: add test for new bookmark special
 + remote-hg: add test for bookmark diverge
 + remote-hg: add test for diverged push
 + remote-hg: add test to push new bookmark
 + remote-hg: add remote tests
 + remote-hg: update bookmarks when using a remote
 + remote-hg: add check_bookmark() test helper
 + remote-bzr: simplify test checks
 + remote-hg: add tests for 'master' bookmark
 + remote-hg: always point HEAD to master
 + remote-hg: improve progress calculation
 + remote-hg: trivial cleanups
 + remote-hg: ensure remote rebasing works
 + remote-hg: upgrade version 1 marks
 + remote-hg: switch from revisions to SHA-1 noteids
 + remote-hg: add version checks to the marks
 + remote-hg: improve node traversing
 + remote-hg: shuffle some code
 + remote-hg: use a shared repository store
 + remote-hg: load all extensions
 + remote-hg: test: simplify previous branch checkout
 + remote-helpers: test: simplify remote URLs
 + remote-helpers: tests: general improvements
 + remote-helpers: test: cleanup style
 + remote-helpers: test: cleanup white-spaces
 + remote-hg: trivial reorganization
 + remote-hg: test: be a little more quiet
 + remote-hg: tests: fix hg merge
 + remote-helpers: tests: use python directly

 Will merge to 'master'.


* hv/config-from-blob (2013-05-12) 5 commits
 - do not die when error in config parsing of buf occurs
 - teach config --blob option to parse config from database
 - config: make parsing stack struct independent from actual data source
 - config: drop cf validity check in get_next_char()
 - config: factor out config file stack management

 Waiting for a reroll.
 $gmane/223964


* nd/clone-connectivity-shortcut (2013-05-28) 4 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 812bd80)
 + clone: open a shortcut for connectivity check
 + index-pack: remove dead code (it should never happen)
 + fetch-pack: prepare updated shallow file before fetching the pack
 + clone: let the user know when check_everything_connected is run

 Will merge to 'master'.


* kb/full-history-compute-treesame-carefully-2 (2013-05-16) 15 commits
 - revision.c: make default history consider bottom commits
 - revision.c: don't show all merges for --parents
 - revision.c: discount side branches when computing TREESAME
 - revision.c: add BOTTOM flag for commits
 - simplify-merges: drop merge from irrelevant side branch
 - simplify-merges: never remove all TREESAME parents
 - t6012: update test for tweaked full-history traversal
 - revision.c: Make --full-history consider more merges
 - Documentation: avoid "uninteresting"
 - rev-list-options.txt: correct TREESAME for P
 - t6111: add parents to tests
 - t6111: allow checking the parents as well
 - t6111: new TREESAME test set
 - t6019: test file dropped in -s ours merge
 - decorate.c: compact table when growing

 Major update to a very core part of the system to improve culling
 of irrelevant parents while traversing a mergy history.

 Will not be a 1.8.3 material, but is an important topic.

 Will merge to 'next'.


* mm/color-auto-default (2013-05-15) 2 commits
 - make color.ui default to 'auto'
 - config: refactor management of color.ui's default value

 Flip the default for color.ui to 'auto', which is what many
 tutorials recommend new users to do.  The updated code claims the
 switch happened at Git 2.0 in the past tense, but we might want to
 expedite it, as this change is not all that important to deserve a
 major version bump.

 I'd vote for merging this without waiting for 2.0.  Comments?

 Waiting for a reroll.


* jh/shorten-refname (2013-05-07) 4 commits
 - t1514: refname shortening is done after dereferencing symbolic refs
 - shorten_unambiguous_ref(): Fix shortening refs/remotes/origin/HEAD to origin
 - t1514: Demonstrate failure to correctly shorten "refs/remotes/origin/HEAD"
 - t1514: Add tests of shortening refnames in strict/loose mode

 When remotes/origin/HEAD is not a symbolic ref, "rev-parse
 --abbrev-ref remotes/origin/HEAD" ought to show "origin", not
 "origin/HEAD", which is fixed with this series (if it is a symbolic
 ref that points at remotes/origin/something, then it should show
 "origin/something" and it already does).

 Expecting a reroll, as an early part of a larger series.


* nd/warn-ambiguous-object-name (2013-05-29) 1 commit
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at e87c9d1)
 + get_sha1: warn about full or short object names that look like refs

 "git cmd <name>", when <name> happens to be a 40-hex string,
 directly uses the 40-hex string as an object name, even if a ref
 "refs/<some hierarchy>/<name>" exists.  This disambiguation order
 is unlikely to change, but we should warn about the ambiguity just
 like we warn when more than one refs/ hierachies share the same
 name.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* jk/packed-refs-race (2013-05-06) 4 commits
 - for_each_ref: load all loose refs before packed refs
 - get_packed_refs: reload packed-refs file when it changes
 - add a stat_validity struct
 - resolve_ref: close race condition for packed refs

 What is the status of this thing?


* fc/at-head (2013-05-08) 13 commits
  (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-04 at f334a2a)
 + sha1_name: compare variable with constant, not constant with variable
 + Add new @ shortcut for HEAD
 + sha1_name: refactor reinterpret()
 + sha1_name: check @{-N} errors sooner
 + sha1_name: reorganize get_sha1_basic()
 + sha1_name: don't waste cycles in the @-parsing loop
 + sha1_name: remove unnecessary braces
 + sha1_name: remove no-op
 + tests: at-combinations: @{N} versus HEAD@{N}
 + tests: at-combinations: increase coverage
 + tests: at-combinations: improve nonsense()
 + tests: at-combinations: check ref names directly
 + tests: at-combinations: simplify setup

 Instead of typing four capital letters "HEAD", you can say "@"
 instead.

 Will merge to 'master'.


* jk/submodule-subdirectory-ok (2013-04-24) 3 commits
 - submodule: fix quoting in relative_path()
 - submodule: drop the top-level requirement
 - rev-parse: add --prefix option

 Allow various subcommands of "git submodule" to be run not from the
 top of the working tree of the superproject.

 Waiting for a reroll.


* jl/submodule-mv (2013-04-23) 5 commits
 - submodule.c: duplicate real_path's return value
 - rm: delete .gitmodules entry of submodules removed from the work tree
 - Teach mv to update the path entry in .gitmodules for moved submodules
 - Teach mv to move submodules using a gitfile
 - Teach mv to move submodules together with their work trees

 "git mv A B" when moving a submodule A does "the right thing",
 inclusing relocating its working tree and adjusting the paths in
 the .gitmodules file.

 Waiting for a reroll.


* jn/add-2.0-u-A-sans-pathspec (2013-04-26) 1 commit
 - git add: -u/-A now affects the entire working tree

 Will cook in 'next' until Git 2.0.


* jc/core-checkstat-2.0 (2013-05-06) 1 commit
 - core.statinfo: remove as promised in Git 2.0
 (this branch uses jc/core-checkstat.)

 Will cook in 'next' until Git 2.0.


* jc/push-2.0-default-to-simple (2013-04-03) 1 commit
 - push: switch default from "matching" to "simple"

 Will cook in 'next' until Git 2.0.


* jc/add-2.0-ignore-removal (2013-04-22) 1 commit
 - git add <pathspec>... defaults to "-A"

 Updated endgame for "git add <pathspec>" that defaults to "--all"
 aka "--no-ignore-removal".

 Will cook in 'next' until Git 2.0.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-04 23:45 What's cooking in git.git (Jun 2013, #02; Tue, 4) Junio C Hamano
@ 2013-06-05  0:04 ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-05  3:02   ` David Lang
                     ` (3 more replies)
  2013-06-05  6:59 ` What's cooking in git.git (Jun 2013, #02; Tue, 4) Johannes Sixt
  1 sibling, 4 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-05  0:04 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: git
  Cc: Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy, Felipe Contreras,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> writes:

> * fc/contrib-related (2013-06-03) 4 commits
>  - contrib: related: parse committish like format-patch
>  - contrib: related: add option to parse from committish
>  - contrib: related: add support for multiple patches
>  - Add new git-related helper to contrib
>
>  Waiting for the design review to settle.

As people may have seen in the discussion on the earlier iteration,
something like this (there may be a room for bikeshedding the name,
though) that takes either a range of changes or set of patches and
finds people who may be able to review them may be a good addition
to our official toolchest.

  http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/221728/focus=221796

Right now, "related" is in contrib/ primarily because its design
review phase is not yet finished and because it is in Ruby, which
the rest of the system does not depend on.

I have some administrative comments on two issues as the maintainer.

 * Do we want to add Ruby dependency?
 * Do we want to keep expanding contrib/?

These have been triggered by "related", but the comments in this
message are not limited to the specific topic (e.g. you can read it
with s/Ruby/<any language we currently do not depend on>/).


On Ruby:

Assuming "related" is a good idea, to make it as the proper part of
the system out of contrib/ when its design review phase is finished,
one of these things has to happen:

 1. Find a volunteer to rewrite it in one of the languages that we
    know the platforms our current users use already support, which
    means either C (not a good match), POSIX shell (not the best
    match), or Perl.

 2. Promote Ruby to the first-class citizen status, which involves
    making sure people on platforms that matter do not have problem
    adding dependency on it (I am primarily worried about MinGW
    folks), and also making sure core developers do not mind
    reviewing code written in it.

As long as we can get as high quality reviews on changes written in
Ruby as we do for the current codebase, it is OK to go route #2, and
that may hopefully happen in the longer term as and there will be
some people, among competent Ruby programmers, who have understood
how the pieces of entire Git are designed to fit together by the
time it happens.

I however do not know how much extra burden it would place to add
dependencies to platform folks, so obviously the safer approach is 1
at least in the immediate future.  My understanding is that msysgit
folks are already having trouble with Python, and we do not want to
go route #2 at least for now.  Having to ship a variant of Git with
NO_PYTHON is already bad enough.  And that is why the option 1 above
does not list Python as a possible candidate.


On contrib/:

Back when Git was very young, it made sense to bundle third-party
tools in our tree's "contrib/" section to give them visibility and
users convenience.  Now Git ecosystem has grown to have many users
who know Git and who do not necessarily come to this list, and with
easy-to-use hosting sites where anybody can publish their ware and
collaborate with their contributors, "giving more visibility" angle
of contrib/ has outlived its usefulness.  When there are multiple
third-party tools that address similar needs, there is not much
point picking one at random and ship it over others, and shipping
all of them is simply crazy.  In an ecosystem with flourishing
third-party add-ons, their products should and will stand on their
own.

As the maintainer, I've been thinking about closing contrib/ area
for new stuff, and shrinking existing ones, either by moving stuff
that are only useful within the context of Git to main part of the
tree (e.g. "contrib/workdir" may move to a new directory "addons/",
some of remote-helpers in contrib/ may move to "remote-helpers/",
etc.), and removing others from contrib/, for this reason.  Of
course, interested folks can take the last version of the removed
ones and continue improving them as standalone projects.

And that is why the list of possible actions in the previous part
does not have "3. Keep it in contrib/ forever" as an option.

That is all for the "administrative comments" as the maintainer.


The rest is just a personal opinion.

If we were looking at a compelling and sizeable web application that
depends on Rails, it is very likely that it would not make much
sense to rewrite it in other languages only to avoid a new language
dependency on Ruby.

But "related" is "read and extract some info out of text files,
spawn a 'blame' (or two) based on that info, read to collect further
info and summarize", for which Ruby does not especially shine
compared to Perl, which is the language we already depend on.
Because of this, I am moderately reluctant to add Ruby dependency
only for this script.  Unless I know people who regularly give us
high quality reviews, and those who support various platforms, are
fine with it, that is.

In the shorter term (read: up to 2.0), I am inclined to vote that we
should go route #1 (i.e. rewrite in Perl once the design settles).

My "personal opinion" above of course assumes that everybody agrees
that "related" is a good addition.  If not, there is "3. not add it
to contrib/ and leave it as an out-of-tree third-party project"
option.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-05  0:04 ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Junio C Hamano
@ 2013-06-05  3:02   ` David Lang
  2013-06-05 14:30     ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-05  4:13   ` Michael Haggerty
                     ` (2 subsequent siblings)
  3 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: David Lang @ 2013-06-05  3:02 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano
  Cc: git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy, Felipe Contreras,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Tue, 4 Jun 2013, Junio C Hamano wrote:

> Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> writes:
>
>
> On Ruby:
>
> Assuming "related" is a good idea, to make it as the proper part of
> the system out of contrib/ when its design review phase is finished,
> one of these things has to happen:
>
> 1. Find a volunteer to rewrite it in one of the languages that we
>    know the platforms our current users use already support, which
>    means either C (not a good match), POSIX shell (not the best
>    match), or Perl.
>
> 2. Promote Ruby to the first-class citizen status, which involves
>    making sure people on platforms that matter do not have problem
>    adding dependency on it (I am primarily worried about MinGW
>    folks), and also making sure core developers do not mind
>    reviewing code written in it.
>
> As long as we can get as high quality reviews on changes written in
> Ruby as we do for the current codebase, it is OK to go route #2, and
> that may hopefully happen in the longer term as and there will be
> some people, among competent Ruby programmers, who have understood
> how the pieces of entire Git are designed to fit together by the
> time it happens.
>
> I however do not know how much extra burden it would place to add
> dependencies to platform folks, so obviously the safer approach is 1
> at least in the immediate future.  My understanding is that msysgit
> folks are already having trouble with Python, and we do not want to
> go route #2 at least for now.  Having to ship a variant of Git with
> NO_PYTHON is already bad enough.  And that is why the option 1 above
> does not list Python as a possible candidate.

As someone who builds minimalist builds (firewalls, openwrt, raspberry pi, etc), 
having to pull in a full ruby install to get git installed would not be 
something I'd like to see.

Yes, openwrt (and I) can build our own version, but that's a pain. I tend to 
build my tight systems from Debian and it's nice to be able to use stock 
packages.

I tend to use git for sysadmin type functions as much as for development, so 
it's very useful even on such small and slow platforms.

> On contrib/:
>
> Back when Git was very young, it made sense to bundle third-party
> tools in our tree's "contrib/" section to give them visibility and
> users convenience.  Now Git ecosystem has grown to have many users
> who know Git and who do not necessarily come to this list, and with
> easy-to-use hosting sites where anybody can publish their ware and
> collaborate with their contributors, "giving more visibility" angle
> of contrib/ has outlived its usefulness.  When there are multiple
> third-party tools that address similar needs, there is not much
> point picking one at random and ship it over others, and shipping
> all of them is simply crazy.  In an ecosystem with flourishing
> third-party add-ons, their products should and will stand on their
> own.
>
> As the maintainer, I've been thinking about closing contrib/ area
> for new stuff, and shrinking existing ones, either by moving stuff
> that are only useful within the context of Git to main part of the
> tree (e.g. "contrib/workdir" may move to a new directory "addons/",
> some of remote-helpers in contrib/ may move to "remote-helpers/",
> etc.), and removing others from contrib/, for this reason.  Of
> course, interested folks can take the last version of the removed
> ones and continue improving them as standalone projects.

If you can, you should leave just enough of a stub in place so that people who 
don't know about the change and try to run the stuff that used to be in contrib/ 
get a message pointing them to the new home.

David Lang

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-05  0:04 ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-05  3:02   ` David Lang
@ 2013-06-05  4:13   ` Michael Haggerty
  2013-06-05 17:41     ` Junio C Hamano
                       ` (2 more replies)
  2013-06-05 14:45   ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 14:54   ` Greg Troxel
  3 siblings, 3 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Michael Haggerty @ 2013-06-05  4:13 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano
  Cc: git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Matthieu Moy, Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt,
	Johannes Schindelin

On 06/05/2013 02:04 AM, Junio C Hamano wrote:
> Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> writes:
> 
>> * fc/contrib-related (2013-06-03) 4 commits
>>  - contrib: related: parse committish like format-patch
>>  - contrib: related: add option to parse from committish
>>  - contrib: related: add support for multiple patches
>>  - Add new git-related helper to contrib
>>
>>  Waiting for the design review to settle.
> 
> As people may have seen in the discussion on the earlier iteration,
> something like this (there may be a room for bikeshedding the name,
> though) that takes either a range of changes or set of patches and
> finds people who may be able to review them may be a good addition
> to our official toolchest.
> 
>   http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/221728/focus=221796
> 
> Right now, "related" is in contrib/ primarily because its design
> review phase is not yet finished and because it is in Ruby, which
> the rest of the system does not depend on.
> 
> I have some administrative comments on two issues as the maintainer.
> 
>  * Do we want to add Ruby dependency?
>  * Do we want to keep expanding contrib/?
> 
> These have been triggered by "related", but the comments in this
> message are not limited to the specific topic (e.g. you can read it
> with s/Ruby/<any language we currently do not depend on>/).
> 
> 
> On Ruby:
> [...]

I don't have an opinion on allowing Ruby into the core, except to say
that I would personally prefer *some* alternative that is more capable
than shell and more modern and self-consistent than Perl.  Python, Ruby,
and Lua would seem to be the obvious candidates, with the latter being
easiest for packagers.

> On contrib/:
> 
> Back when Git was very young, it made sense to bundle third-party
> tools in our tree's "contrib/" section to give them visibility and
> users convenience.  Now Git ecosystem has grown to have many users
> who know Git and who do not necessarily come to this list, and with
> easy-to-use hosting sites where anybody can publish their ware and
> collaborate with their contributors, "giving more visibility" angle
> of contrib/ has outlived its usefulness.  When there are multiple
> third-party tools that address similar needs, there is not much
> point picking one at random and ship it over others, and shipping
> all of them is simply crazy.  In an ecosystem with flourishing
> third-party add-ons, their products should and will stand on their
> own.

For completeness, let me point out two other small advantages of contrib:

* a tool in contrib can assume that it is being bundled with the
corresponding version of Git, and therefore doesn't necessarily have to
go to the effort of supporting older versions of Git.

* at the source-code level, a tool in contrib can take advantage of some
of the Git build/test infrastructure, though I don't know whether they
currently do.


But my main point is that I think it would be easier to phase out
contrib/ if there were a good alternate way of providing visibility to
"satellite" projects.  The relevant Git wiki page [1] is the most likely
candidate, but it is a bit overwhelming due to its size, it has fallen
into disuse because it was broken for such a long time, and it is not
prominently linked to from git-scm.com.  If it were curated a bit, it
would help users find the best ancillary tools quickly.  Perhaps ranking
the tools based on the results of the Git user surveys would help bring
the most popular to the top of each category.

Michael

[1] https://git.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Interfaces,_frontends,_and_tools

-- 
Michael Haggerty
mhagger@alum.mit.edu
http://softwareswirl.blogspot.com/

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: What's cooking in git.git (Jun 2013, #02; Tue, 4)
  2013-06-04 23:45 What's cooking in git.git (Jun 2013, #02; Tue, 4) Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-05  0:04 ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Junio C Hamano
@ 2013-06-05  6:59 ` Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-05  7:12   ` Jeff King
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Sixt @ 2013-06-05  6:59 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano; +Cc: git, Jeff King

Am 6/5/2013 1:45, schrieb Junio C Hamano:
> * jk/test-exit-code-by-signal (2013-06-02) 1 commit
>   (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 25af892)
>  + t0005: test git exit code from signal death
> 
>  Will merge to 'master'.

I haven't gotten around to run this new test on Windows. I've reason to
believe that it won't pass as is. Please don't let it graduate, yet.

-- Hannes

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: What's cooking in git.git (Jun 2013, #02; Tue, 4)
  2013-06-05  6:59 ` What's cooking in git.git (Jun 2013, #02; Tue, 4) Johannes Sixt
@ 2013-06-05  7:12   ` Jeff King
  2013-06-06  6:34     ` [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows Johannes Sixt
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Jeff King @ 2013-06-05  7:12 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Sixt; +Cc: Junio C Hamano, git

On Wed, Jun 05, 2013 at 08:59:15AM +0200, Johannes Sixt wrote:

> Am 6/5/2013 1:45, schrieb Junio C Hamano:
> > * jk/test-exit-code-by-signal (2013-06-02) 1 commit
> >   (merged to 'next' on 2013-06-03 at 25af892)
> >  + t0005: test git exit code from signal death
> > 
> >  Will merge to 'master'.
> 
> I haven't gotten around to run this new test on Windows. I've reason to
> believe that it won't pass as is. Please don't let it graduate, yet.

Yeah, I sort of assumed that we would need to check for either "3" or
"131" on Windows, but I wasn't sure which. I don't think there is any
rush on it.

-Peff

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-05  3:02   ` David Lang
@ 2013-06-05 14:30     ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-05 14:30 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: David Lang
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c Duy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Tue, Jun 4, 2013 at 10:02 PM, David Lang <david@lang.hm> wrote:
> On Tue, 4 Jun 2013, Junio C Hamano wrote:
>
>> Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> writes:
>>
>>
>> On Ruby:
>>
>> Assuming "related" is a good idea, to make it as the proper part of
>> the system out of contrib/ when its design review phase is finished,
>> one of these things has to happen:
>>
>> 1. Find a volunteer to rewrite it in one of the languages that we
>>    know the platforms our current users use already support, which
>>    means either C (not a good match), POSIX shell (not the best
>>    match), or Perl.
>>
>> 2. Promote Ruby to the first-class citizen status, which involves
>>    making sure people on platforms that matter do not have problem
>>    adding dependency on it (I am primarily worried about MinGW
>>    folks), and also making sure core developers do not mind
>>    reviewing code written in it.
>>
>> As long as we can get as high quality reviews on changes written in
>> Ruby as we do for the current codebase, it is OK to go route #2, and
>> that may hopefully happen in the longer term as and there will be
>> some people, among competent Ruby programmers, who have understood
>> how the pieces of entire Git are designed to fit together by the
>> time it happens.
>>
>> I however do not know how much extra burden it would place to add
>> dependencies to platform folks, so obviously the safer approach is 1
>> at least in the immediate future.  My understanding is that msysgit
>> folks are already having trouble with Python, and we do not want to
>> go route #2 at least for now.  Having to ship a variant of Git with
>> NO_PYTHON is already bad enough.  And that is why the option 1 above
>> does not list Python as a possible candidate.
>
>
> As someone who builds minimalist builds (firewalls, openwrt, raspberry pi,
> etc), having to pull in a full ruby install to get git installed would not
> be something I'd like to see.

You wouldn't _have_ to, just like you don't _have_ to install Python right now.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-05  0:04 ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-05  3:02   ` David Lang
  2013-06-05  4:13   ` Michael Haggerty
@ 2013-06-05 14:45   ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06  7:26     ` demerphq
  2013-06-06 14:54   ` Greg Troxel
  3 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-05 14:45 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano
  Cc: git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Tue, Jun 4, 2013 at 7:04 PM, Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> wrote:
> Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> writes:

> I however do not know how much extra burden it would place to add
> dependencies to platform folks, so obviously the safer approach is 1
> at least in the immediate future.  My understanding is that msysgit
> folks are already having trouble with Python, and we do not want to
> go route #2 at least for now.  Having to ship a variant of Git with
> NO_PYTHON is already bad enough.  And that is why the option 1 above
> does not list Python as a possible candidate.

This rests on the assumption that Ruby would be as difficult to
distribute as Python, which might not be the case.

> As the maintainer, I've been thinking about closing contrib/ area
> for new stuff, and shrinking existing ones, either by moving stuff
> that are only useful within the context of Git to main part of the
> tree (e.g. "contrib/workdir" may move to a new directory "addons/",
> some of remote-helpers in contrib/ may move to "remote-helpers/",
> etc.), and removing others from contrib/, for this reason.  Of
> course, interested folks can take the last version of the removed
> ones and continue improving them as standalone projects.

This does make sense, however, I do think some parts of Git might be
more maintainable if they have their own Makefile (e.g. bash
completion), where it's clear where they should be installed by
default.

Either way, the user might want to do 'install-all' or
'install-addons', to install all these things, and I think a good rule
of thumb is that if we don't want 'install-all' to install certain
script (eventually), then that script probably doesn't belong in
'contrib' (or anywhere in Git).

> The rest is just a personal opinion.
>
> If we were looking at a compelling and sizeable web application that
> depends on Rails, it is very likely that it would not make much
> sense to rewrite it in other languages only to avoid a new language
> dependency on Ruby.
>
> But "related" is "read and extract some info out of text files,
> spawn a 'blame' (or two) based on that info, read to collect further
> info and summarize", for which Ruby does not especially shine
> compared to Perl, which is the language we already depend on.
> Because of this, I am moderately reluctant to add Ruby dependency
> only for this script.  Unless I know people who regularly give us
> high quality reviews, and those who support various platforms, are
> fine with it, that is.
>
> In the shorter term (read: up to 2.0), I am inclined to vote that we
> should go route #1 (i.e. rewrite in Perl once the design settles).

That might make sense for the shorter term, but in longer term I see
Perl as declining in favor of other languages. It's only a matter of
time before Ruby surpasses Perl in popularity, and soon enough new
contributors to the Git project will have problems trying to improve
Git because parts of it are written in a language they are not
familiar with, and have trouble learning (isn't that already
happening?).

The Ruby vs. Python is another question altogether, I could go into
detail about why I think Ruby is a better choice, but my point right
now is that Perl is not a good choice for the future.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-05  4:13   ` Michael Haggerty
@ 2013-06-05 17:41     ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-06 12:52     ` Matthieu Moy
  2013-06-06 19:48     ` Thomas Ferris Nicolaisen
  2 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-05 17:41 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Michael Haggerty
  Cc: git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Matthieu Moy, Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt,
	Johannes Schindelin

Michael Haggerty <mhagger@alum.mit.edu> writes:

> For completeness, let me point out two other small advantages of contrib:
>
> * a tool in contrib can assume that it is being bundled with the
> corresponding version of Git, and therefore doesn't necessarily have to
> go to the effort of supporting older versions of Git.

It is true that in-tree stuff can go in-sync with the rest, but I
think that is irrelevant, as we are discussing a tool in contrib/;
if it is part of the core, it deserves that benefit over tools
developed out-of-tree (that need to worry about utilizing new
features after a version check).  After moving tools that we want to
keep as a part of core out of contrib/, they will still be in-sync.

For those that alternative third-party designs and implementations
for solving the non-core problems they try to solve (e.g. ciabot,
continuous, blameview) can exist, it would be better for the
ecosystem of they compete with their alternatives on the same
ground.

> But my main point is that I think it would be easier to phase out
> contrib/ if there were a good alternate way of providing visibility to
> "satellite" projects.  The relevant Git wiki page [1] is the most likely
> candidate, but it is a bit overwhelming due to its size, it has fallen
> into disuse because it was broken for such a long time, and it is not
> prominently linked to from git-scm.com.  If it were curated a bit, it
> would help users find the best ancillary tools quickly.  Perhaps ranking
> the tools based on the results of the Git user surveys would help bring
> the most popular to the top of each category.

That is a very good point.

>
> Michael
>
> [1] https://git.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Interfaces,_frontends,_and_tools

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-05  7:12   ` Jeff King
@ 2013-06-06  6:34     ` Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-06  6:37       ` Jeff King
  2013-06-07 10:01       ` Erik Faye-Lund
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Sixt @ 2013-06-06  6:34 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jeff King; +Cc: Junio C Hamano, git

From: Johannes Sixt <j6t@kdbg.org>

The test case depends on that test-sigchain can commit suicide by a call
to raise(SIGTERM) in a way that run-command.c::wait_or_whine() can detect
as death through a signal. There are no POSIX signals on Windows, and a
sufficiently close emulation is not available in the Microsoft C runtime
(and probably not even possible).

The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).

We could check for exit code 3 in addition to 143, but that would miss
the point of the test entirely. Hence, just skip it on Windows.

Signed-off-by: Johannes Sixt <j6t@kdbg.org>
---
 t/t0005-signals.sh | 2 +-
 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)

diff --git a/t/t0005-signals.sh b/t/t0005-signals.sh
index ad9e604..981437b 100755
--- a/t/t0005-signals.sh
+++ b/t/t0005-signals.sh
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ test_expect_success 'sigchain works' '
 	test_cmp expect actual
 '
 
-test_expect_success 'signals are propagated using shell convention' '
+test_expect_success !MINGW 'signals are propagated using shell convention' '
 	# we use exec here to avoid any sub-shell interpretation
 	# of the exit code
 	git config alias.sigterm "!exec test-sigchain" &&
-- 
1.8.3.1489.g15123b5

^ permalink raw reply related	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-06  6:34     ` [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows Johannes Sixt
@ 2013-06-06  6:37       ` Jeff King
  2013-06-06  6:41         ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-07 10:01       ` Erik Faye-Lund
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Jeff King @ 2013-06-06  6:37 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Sixt; +Cc: Junio C Hamano, git

On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 08:34:41AM +0200, Johannes Sixt wrote:

> From: Johannes Sixt <j6t@kdbg.org>
> 
> The test case depends on that test-sigchain can commit suicide by a call
> to raise(SIGTERM) in a way that run-command.c::wait_or_whine() can detect
> as death through a signal. There are no POSIX signals on Windows, and a
> sufficiently close emulation is not available in the Microsoft C runtime
> (and probably not even possible).
> 
> The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
> action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
> implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
> 
> We could check for exit code 3 in addition to 143, but that would miss
> the point of the test entirely. Hence, just skip it on Windows.

Thanks. I wasn't quite clear on how the signal handling worked on
Windows, but from your description, I agree there is not any point in
running the test at all.

Acked-by: Jeff King <peff@peff.net>

-Peff

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-06  6:37       ` Jeff King
@ 2013-06-06  6:41         ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06  6:44           ` Jeff King
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-06  6:41 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jeff King; +Cc: Johannes Sixt, Junio C Hamano, git

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 1:37 AM, Jeff King <peff@peff.net> wrote:
> On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 08:34:41AM +0200, Johannes Sixt wrote:
>
>> From: Johannes Sixt <j6t@kdbg.org>
>>
>> The test case depends on that test-sigchain can commit suicide by a call
>> to raise(SIGTERM) in a way that run-command.c::wait_or_whine() can detect
>> as death through a signal. There are no POSIX signals on Windows, and a
>> sufficiently close emulation is not available in the Microsoft C runtime
>> (and probably not even possible).
>>
>> The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
>> action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
>> implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
>>
>> We could check for exit code 3 in addition to 143, but that would miss
>> the point of the test entirely. Hence, just skip it on Windows.
>
> Thanks. I wasn't quite clear on how the signal handling worked on
> Windows, but from your description, I agree there is not any point in
> running the test at all.

Shouldn't we clarify that Git exit codes only work on UNIX-like
operating systems?

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-06  6:41         ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06  6:44           ` Jeff King
  2013-06-06  6:48             ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 17:21             ` Junio C Hamano
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Jeff King @ 2013-06-06  6:44 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras; +Cc: Johannes Sixt, Junio C Hamano, git

On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 01:41:05AM -0500, Felipe Contreras wrote:

> > Thanks. I wasn't quite clear on how the signal handling worked on
> > Windows, but from your description, I agree there is not any point in
> > running the test at all.
> 
> Shouldn't we clarify that Git exit codes only work on UNIX-like
> operating systems?

Clarify where? My impression is that this issue is well-known in the
msys world, and it is a platform issue, not a git issue. If somebody
wants to write a note somewhere in the git documentation, that's fine
with me, but I'm not clear on exactly what it would even say.

-Peff

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-06  6:44           ` Jeff King
@ 2013-06-06  6:48             ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 17:21             ` Junio C Hamano
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-06  6:48 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jeff King; +Cc: Johannes Sixt, Junio C Hamano, git

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 1:44 AM, Jeff King <peff@peff.net> wrote:
> On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 01:41:05AM -0500, Felipe Contreras wrote:
>
>> > Thanks. I wasn't quite clear on how the signal handling worked on
>> > Windows, but from your description, I agree there is not any point in
>> > running the test at all.
>>
>> Shouldn't we clarify that Git exit codes only work on UNIX-like
>> operating systems?
>
> Clarify where?

Documentation/technical/api-run-command.txt

> My impression is that this issue is well-known in the
> msys world, and it is a platform issue, not a git issue. If somebody
> wants to write a note somewhere in the git documentation, that's fine
> with me, but I'm not clear on exactly what it would even say.

That the exit code is not the same in Windows (not msys).

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-05 14:45   ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06  7:26     ` demerphq
  2013-06-06  7:46       ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: demerphq @ 2013-06-06  7:26 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, Git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On 5 June 2013 16:45, Felipe Contreras <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Tue, Jun 4, 2013 at 7:04 PM, Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> wrote:
> That might make sense for the shorter term, but in longer term I see
> Perl as declining in favor of other languages. It's only a matter of
> time before Ruby surpasses Perl in popularity, and soon enough new
> contributors to the Git project will have problems trying to improve
> Git because parts of it are written in a language they are not
> familiar with, and have trouble learning (isn't that already
> happening?).
>
> The Ruby vs. Python is another question altogether, I could go into
> detail about why I think Ruby is a better choice, but my point right
> now is that Perl is not a good choice for the future.

Good thing you are being objective and leaving out the Python 3.0
mess, the long legacy of backwards compatibility in the Perl
community, the active community behind it, its extensive portability
support, and fail to mention the lack of an equivalent to CPAN. We
wouldn't want facts to get in the way of a personal bias would we?

Just thought I'd push back on the FUD. People have been saying Perl is
going away for decades...

Yves

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06  7:26     ` demerphq
@ 2013-06-06  7:46       ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 12:24         ` Barry Fishman
  2013-06-06 20:41         ` Charles McGarvey
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-06  7:46 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: demerphq
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, Git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 2:26 AM, demerphq <demerphq@gmail.com> wrote:
> On 5 June 2013 16:45, Felipe Contreras <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Tue, Jun 4, 2013 at 7:04 PM, Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> wrote:
>> That might make sense for the shorter term, but in longer term I see
>> Perl as declining in favor of other languages. It's only a matter of
>> time before Ruby surpasses Perl in popularity, and soon enough new
>> contributors to the Git project will have problems trying to improve
>> Git because parts of it are written in a language they are not
>> familiar with, and have trouble learning (isn't that already
>> happening?).
>>
>> The Ruby vs. Python is another question altogether, I could go into
>> detail about why I think Ruby is a better choice, but my point right
>> now is that Perl is not a good choice for the future.
>
> Good thing you are being objective and leaving out the Python 3.0
> mess, the long legacy of backwards compatibility in the Perl
> community, the active community behind it, its extensive portability
> support, and fail to mention the lack of an equivalent to CPAN. We
> wouldn't want facts to get in the way of a personal bias would we?

None of that has anything to do with Perl's popularity.

> Just thought I'd push back on the FUD. People have been saying Perl is
> going away for decades...

Perl has been going away for the last decade [1], and will continue to
go away. Perl is going away, and that an undeniable fact, and if you
are not interested in discussing on the basis of reality, I'm not
interested in discussing with you.

[1] http://www.tiobe.com/content/paperinfo/tpci/images/tpci_trends.png

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06  7:46       ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06 12:24         ` Barry Fishman
  2013-06-06 13:01           ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 20:41         ` Charles McGarvey
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Barry Fishman @ 2013-06-06 12:24 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: git


On 2013-06-06 03:46:59 EDT, Felipe Contreras wrote:
> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 2:26 AM, demerphq <demerphq@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Good thing you are being objective and leaving out the Python 3.0
>> mess, the long legacy of backwards compatibility in the Perl
>> community, the active community behind it, its extensive portability
>> support, and fail to mention the lack of an equivalent to CPAN. We
>> wouldn't want facts to get in the way of a personal bias would we?
>
> None of that has anything to do with Perl's popularity.
>
>> Just thought I'd push back on the FUD. People have been saying Perl is
>> going away for decades...
>
> Perl has been going away for the last decade [1], and will continue to
> go away. Perl is going away, and that an undeniable fact, and if you
> are not interested in discussing on the basis of reality, I'm not
> interested in discussing with you.
>
> [1] http://www.tiobe.com/content/paperinfo/tpci/images/tpci_trends.png

I don't think the usefulness of a language should be judged by hits on a
web site.

Personally I would like the Git client to be packaged with as few
dependencies as possible.  Right now that seems to require Shell, Sed,
Awk and Perl.  The documentation has other requirements, but a prebuild
tar file is available.

I would have the rest of the distribution be bundled as something
like "git-utils" which could have a subdirectory for each support
language.  Then one could even make available alternative
implementations of higher level utilities and people could decide if
support of a specific language was useful to them.

Most such extension code is simple, although more complex than suitable
for just Shell/Sed/Awk.  People in each language community could provide
code which meets the needs of their community, and the Git project
itself would not need to make (Solomon like) decisions about what
extension languages to support.

--
Barry Fishman

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-05  4:13   ` Michael Haggerty
  2013-06-05 17:41     ` Junio C Hamano
@ 2013-06-06 12:52     ` Matthieu Moy
  2013-06-07 16:11       ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-06 19:48     ` Thomas Ferris Nicolaisen
  2 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Matthieu Moy @ 2013-06-06 12:52 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Michael Haggerty
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt,
	Johannes Schindelin

Michael Haggerty <mhagger@alum.mit.edu> writes:

> * at the source-code level, a tool in contrib can take advantage of some
> of the Git build/test infrastructure, though I don't know whether they
> currently do.

They do not do much AFAICT. For example, contrib/subtree/t/Makefile is
essentially copy-pasted from Git's equivalent.

But they can do to some extend, for example "make install" in
contrib/mw-to-git/ re-uses Git's Makefile to hardcode the PERL_PATH in
the file, find Git's exec-path & so. I'd love to be able to use
Documentation/Makefile and t/Makefile too for external programs meant to
be used as a Git command.

That does not strictly imply that these commands be maintained within
git.git, as we could imagine:

* Ask the user to build external programs with

  make GIT_ROOT=where/git/lives/

* or, ask users to checkout the external program as a subdirectory of
  git.git to build it (for example, clang's build installation ask you
  to put clang as a subdirectory of LLVM's tree).

> But my main point is that I think it would be easier to phase out
> contrib/ if there were a good alternate way of providing visibility to
> "satellite" projects. [...] Perhaps ranking
> the tools based on the results of the Git user surveys would help bring
> the most popular to the top of each category.

I think this is the most important point. A good example would be
git-multimail: for now, the shell version in contrib/ is somehow
considered as the official hook to send emails, just because it is in
contrib, while git-multimail is clearly superior (unless you don't have
a python interpreter on your server).


I also see contrib/ as a "safe" place to live, in that the likeliness
for the project to be abandonned is rather small. Especially for small
pieces of code, it's easy to create a repo and throw the code somewhere
on GitHub, but maintaining it is harder. Take again the example of
post-receive-email, the code was originally written by Andy Parkins, but
the community took over it (Andy's last commit on the script was in
2008). I'm not sure this would have been so easy with a script hosted on
an arbitrary repo.


I'm not opposed to Junio's proposal to restrict contrib/ (although a bit
reluctant), but I think this should be done with care, at least to give
potential users a way to chose which tool to use (really, nobody want to
go use https://git.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/InterfacesFrontendsAndTools
to pick the right tool. It's a great list, but not a guide).

-- 
Matthieu Moy
http://www-verimag.imag.fr/~moy/

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 12:24         ` Barry Fishman
@ 2013-06-06 13:01           ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 13:46             ` Barry Fishman
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-06 13:01 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Barry Fishman; +Cc: git

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 7:24 AM, Barry Fishman <barry_fishman@acm.org> wrote:
>
> On 2013-06-06 03:46:59 EDT, Felipe Contreras wrote:
>> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 2:26 AM, demerphq <demerphq@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> Good thing you are being objective and leaving out the Python 3.0
>>> mess, the long legacy of backwards compatibility in the Perl
>>> community, the active community behind it, its extensive portability
>>> support, and fail to mention the lack of an equivalent to CPAN. We
>>> wouldn't want facts to get in the way of a personal bias would we?
>>
>> None of that has anything to do with Perl's popularity.
>>
>>> Just thought I'd push back on the FUD. People have been saying Perl is
>>> going away for decades...
>>
>> Perl has been going away for the last decade [1], and will continue to
>> go away. Perl is going away, and that an undeniable fact, and if you
>> are not interested in discussing on the basis of reality, I'm not
>> interested in discussing with you.
>>
>> [1] http://www.tiobe.com/content/paperinfo/tpci/images/tpci_trends.png
>
> I don't think the usefulness of a language should be judged by hits on a
> web site.

Nobody is judging the usefulness of a language, I have plenty of
arguments for that, but this is about popularity.

> Personally I would like the Git client to be packaged with as few
> dependencies as possible.  Right now that seems to require Shell, Sed,
> Awk and Perl.  The documentation has other requirements, but a prebuild
> tar file is available.

I would be perfectly fine with replacing shell, sed, awk and perl with
ruby. But that's not what you are arguing, is it?

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 13:01           ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06 13:46             ` Barry Fishman
  2013-06-06 14:09               ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Barry Fishman @ 2013-06-06 13:46 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: git


On 2013-06-06 09:01:48 EDT, Felipe Contreras wrote:
> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 7:24 AM, Barry Fishman <barry_fishman@acm.org> wrote:
>>
>> On 2013-06-06 03:46:59 EDT, Felipe Contreras wrote:
>>> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 2:26 AM, demerphq <demerphq@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> Good thing you are being objective and leaving out the Python 3.0
>>>> mess, the long legacy of backwards compatibility in the Perl
>>>> community, the active community behind it, its extensive portability
>>>> support, and fail to mention the lack of an equivalent to CPAN. We
>>>> wouldn't want facts to get in the way of a personal bias would we?
>>>
>>> None of that has anything to do with Perl's popularity.
>>>
>>>> Just thought I'd push back on the FUD. People have been saying Perl is
>>>> going away for decades...
>>>
>>> Perl has been going away for the last decade [1], and will continue to
>>> go away. Perl is going away, and that an undeniable fact, and if you
>>> are not interested in discussing on the basis of reality, I'm not
>>> interested in discussing with you.
>>>
>>> [1] http://www.tiobe.com/content/paperinfo/tpci/images/tpci_trends.png
>>
>> I don't think the usefulness of a language should be judged by hits on a
>> web site.
>
> Nobody is judging the usefulness of a language, I have plenty of
> arguments for that, but this is about popularity.

I used "usefulness" in its general vague sense.  It is useful to be popular,
I don't make choices solely on that or I would be writing everything in
Java.

>> Personally I would like the Git client to be packaged with as few
>> dependencies as possible.  Right now that seems to require Shell, Sed,
>> Awk and Perl.  The documentation has other requirements, but a prebuild
>> tar file is available.
>
> I would be perfectly fine with replacing shell, sed, awk and perl with
> ruby. But that's not what you are arguing, is it?

I'm talking about porcelain code and not core functionality which should
be left in C.  I'm saying that you should be free to provide Ruby
implementations of all such superstructure.  And the same can be done by
(but not required by) the Perl, Python, Tcl and even C, Haskel, Guile
and whatever communities.  Most such higher level code is fairly
trivial, and if the file names are kept the same, the same test
procedures could be run.

I don't think the cost of duplication of code functionality is that
significant, since it would bring new people to the project.  After all
this is a free project and not a commerical venture.  It certainly helps
porting to new platforms.  Separate language communities would be
maintaining their own contributions, with their own experimental
directories.

Translating the same functionality to multiple languages requires
careful reading which can help identify some hidden bugs.

-- 
Barry Fishman

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 13:46             ` Barry Fishman
@ 2013-06-06 14:09               ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 14:41                 ` Barry Fishman
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-06 14:09 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Barry Fishman; +Cc: git

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 8:46 AM, Barry Fishman <barry_fishman@acm.org> wrote:
>
> On 2013-06-06 09:01:48 EDT, Felipe Contreras wrote:

>> Nobody is judging the usefulness of a language, I have plenty of
>> arguments for that, but this is about popularity.
>
> I used "usefulness" in its general vague sense.  It is useful to be popular,
> I don't make choices solely on that or I would be writing everything in
> Java.

Straw man.

>>> Personally I would like the Git client to be packaged with as few
>>> dependencies as possible.  Right now that seems to require Shell, Sed,
>>> Awk and Perl.  The documentation has other requirements, but a prebuild
>>> tar file is available.
>>
>> I would be perfectly fine with replacing shell, sed, awk and perl with
>> ruby. But that's not what you are arguing, is it?

I don't know what you are saying, but it clearly has nothing to do
with the point.

Perl is declining, and it would be wise to use another language instead of it.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 14:09               ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06 14:41                 ` Barry Fishman
  2013-06-06 15:04                   ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Barry Fishman @ 2013-06-06 14:41 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: git

On 2013-06-06 10:09:21 EDT, Felipe Contreras wrote:
> I don't know what you are saying, but it clearly has nothing to do
> with the point.
>
> Perl is declining, and it would be wise to use another language
> instead of it.

You want a simple statement.  I don't particulary like Perl, but it has
worked well for the project.

If you have a better solution, then write all the code to replace it,
and demonstrate with a significant number of active users that your
solution works out better in practice.

Wasn't that how Git started?

-- 
Barry Fishman

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-05  0:04 ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Junio C Hamano
                     ` (2 preceding siblings ...)
  2013-06-05 14:45   ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06 14:54   ` Greg Troxel
  2013-06-06 15:17     ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 16:22     ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Johannes Schindelin
  3 siblings, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Greg Troxel @ 2013-06-06 14:54 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano
  Cc: git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy, Felipe Contreras,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

[-- Attachment #1: Type: text/plain, Size: 3464 bytes --]


As one of the people who helps maintain git packages in pkgsrc, my
initial reaction is negative to adding a ruby dependency.  There are
several not-entirely-related reasons:

git is a core tool that people use on almost the smallest of boxes,
perhaps even replacing rcs for managing local config files.  On such
machines, even perl may be large, but a second scripting language seems
excessive.  On a NetBSD 6 i386 system, the size of the ruby193-base
binary package (as installed) is 25 MB (vs 15 MB for the git base
package, which lacks gitk and docs).  (Presently, the git base package
defaults to requiring python and installing the git_remote_helpers, but
I think that's a bug.)  perl is 54 MB.

I am unclear on how mature/stable ruby is.  perl has a good track record
over the last many years.  In particular, no one in pkgsrc has felt the
need to support multiple concurrent versions of perl.  But there
presently exists both 1.8 and 1.9 in pkgsrc (and there are multiple
python verions).  So given how critical git is on many systems, I'd ask
if the ruby requirement is for a stable vs old vs bleeding-edge version,
and how that is expected to function over the next 5 years.  (With perl,
the answer seems to be "any half-way modern version of 5.x is fine, from
unreasonably old to the latest release".)  By stable, I don't mean that
a particular ruby release works well.  I mean the experience of having
code that depends on ruby over many years, and whether one can just use
whatever ruby happens to be there, or whether it's effort to manage
having an acceptable version.

From a packaging viewpoint, dependencies are costly, because they force
build and installation of them before the package can be built.  In a
source-centric packaging environment (where it's normal to build, rather
than only having pre-built packages), the question is if the git package
needs ruby, which is a different question than whether something in git
which may be optional needs ruby.  So if ruby, or something else, is
needed for optional components, it would be really nice if the build
system were such that it was simple (via arguments to configure,
selecting subdirs, or something functionally similar) to build the main
part, and then the ruby part as a separate build.  Then, it would be
pretty easy to have git-ruby package that has the ruby parts.  But if
the ruby part isn't considered optional, that won't work.  (Note that
the usual GNU/Linux approach of split binary packages doesn't really
address this, because as I understand it you need the union of the
dependencies installed to build once, and then tar up the resulting bits
separately.  So that fixes the problem for people that install binaries,
but doesn't help building from source.)

tcl/tk is another dependency, but it seems limited to gitk.  pkgsrc has
a separate scmgit-gitk package, which is relatively easy to maintain
because it just involves selecting subdirs to build.  So that's an
example of a good way to do it, from the source-based packaging
viewpoint.

Finally, I realize that most people on this list will build git directly
From sources.  While that of course has to be smooth, I think great
weight should be given to how packaging systems use releases and how
that impacts packaging effort and the eventual user experience.  I would
guess that over 99% of git users are running binaries built from a
packaging system.


[-- Attachment #2: Type: application/pgp-signature, Size: 194 bytes --]

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 14:41                 ` Barry Fishman
@ 2013-06-06 15:04                   ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-06 15:04 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Barry Fishman; +Cc: git

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 9:41 AM, Barry Fishman <barry_fishman@acm.org> wrote:
> On 2013-06-06 10:09:21 EDT, Felipe Contreras wrote:
>> I don't know what you are saying, but it clearly has nothing to do
>> with the point.
>>
>> Perl is declining, and it would be wise to use another language
>> instead of it.
>
> You want a simple statement.  I don't particulary like Perl, but it has
> worked well for the project.

It would serve it less and less as the years go by.

> If you have a better solution, then write all the code to replace it,

False dichotomy fallacy. I don't need to do that.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 14:54   ` Greg Troxel
@ 2013-06-06 15:17     ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 16:09       ` David Lang
  2013-06-06 17:16       ` Greg Troxel
  2013-06-06 16:22     ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Johannes Schindelin
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-06 15:17 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Greg Troxel
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 9:54 AM, Greg Troxel <gdt@ir.bbn.com> wrote:
>
> As one of the people who helps maintain git packages in pkgsrc, my
> initial reaction is negative to adding a ruby dependency.  There are
> several not-entirely-related reasons:
>
> git is a core tool that people use on almost the smallest of boxes,
> perhaps even replacing rcs for managing local config files.  On such
> machines, even perl may be large, but a second scripting language seems
> excessive.

You can compile Git without any of them.

> On a NetBSD 6 i386 system, the size of the ruby193-base
> binary package (as installed) is 25 MB (vs 15 MB for the git base
> package, which lacks gitk and docs).  (Presently, the git base package
> defaults to requiring python and installing the git_remote_helpers, but
> I think that's a bug.)  perl is 54 MB.

That's only the default, if the default doesn't suit you, don't use the default.

Besides, that doesn't carry any weight if Perl code is replaced with
Ruby code, or Python.

It is quite possible to slowly rewrite the Perl scripts, preferably
move as much code as possible to C, but the rest to shell, or Ruby.
For Ruby, we could maintain both versions at the same time until the
new versions are ready, and then the Perl dependency gets deprecated.
In this interim time, people that don't want Ruby could use the Perl
versions. But I think this is overkill. Yes, ideally we wouldn't want
to depend on both Ruby and Perl, but I think it's OK to do that for a
while, until the Perl scripts are rewritten.

In the end my point remains unchanged; Perl is declining, so it would
be wise for the future to use another scripting language instead.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 15:17     ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06 16:09       ` David Lang
  2013-06-06 18:16         ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 20:29         ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-06 17:16       ` Greg Troxel
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: David Lang @ 2013-06-06 16:09 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder,
	Thomas Rast, René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Thu, 6 Jun 2013, Felipe Contreras wrote:

> In the end my point remains unchanged; Perl is declining, so it would
> be wise for the future to use another scripting language instead.

Perl use may or may not be declining (depending on how you measure it), but are 
you really willing to take on the task of re-writing everything that's in Perl 
into another language and force all developers of scripts to learn that other 
language? what's the ROI of this?

Perl isn't going to disappear any time soon. What makes you think that whatever 
language you pick to replace Perl is going to be more stable than Perl is?

and, like the parent poster, by 'stable' I mean from the compatibility point of 
view.

What are the odds that the 'newer' language that you pick is going to pull a 
"python 3" on you?

There have been a very large number of scripting languages show up, make a lot 
of press, and then fade in favor of other languages while Perl has continued. 
It's not the sexy languange nowdays, but it's there, reliable, and used so 
heavily that there's really no chance of it dissapearing in the forseable 
future.

David Lang

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 14:54   ` Greg Troxel
  2013-06-06 15:17     ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06 16:22     ` Johannes Schindelin
  2013-06-06 20:40       ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-08  2:17       ` Duy Nguyen
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Schindelin @ 2013-06-06 16:22 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Greg Troxel
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy, Felipe Contreras,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Hi Greg,

On Thu, 6 Jun 2013, Greg Troxel wrote:

> As one of the people who helps maintain git packages in pkgsrc, my
> initial reaction is negative to adding a ruby dependency.

My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).

As you can see from the commit history, I was the primary force behind
trying to get everything "core" in Git away from requiring scripting
languages (I think it is an awesome thing to provide APIs for as many
languages as possible, but a not-so-cool thing to use more than one
language in the core code). It does not seem that anybody picked up that
task when I left, though.

Ciao,
Johannes

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 15:17     ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 16:09       ` David Lang
@ 2013-06-06 17:16       ` Greg Troxel
  2013-06-06 18:24         ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 21:05         ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Greg Troxel @ 2013-06-06 17:16 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

[-- Attachment #1: Type: text/plain, Size: 2276 bytes --]


Felipe Contreras <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> writes:

> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 9:54 AM, Greg Troxel <gdt@ir.bbn.com> wrote:
>>
>> git is a core tool that people use on almost the smallest of boxes,
>> perhaps even replacing rcs for managing local config files.  On such
>> machines, even perl may be large, but a second scripting language seems
>> excessive.
>
> You can compile Git without any of them.

That ignores the 99% of people who use packaged versions.  The question
is really "Should the standared approach for building be to use or not
use dependency X?".  Really this should be expressed in the README, and
it creates expectations for someone who just installs the git package in
terms of whether pieces of functionality are there.  Packagers generally
should be reading the README and including required/recommended
dependencies and not including optional dependencies (in the main
package).  The information in INSTALL is pretty reasonable, but it
doesn't really clearly say "if you hand someone git built without perl,
it is { perfectly ok but missing a fringe optional feature | deficient
because "git add -p" won't work }.   I'm leaning towards the "deficient"
camp.

So "you can compile git without X" should really translate into "when
one runs the default build following the instructions, and does not take
affirmative steps to use X, X should not be used or depended on".  If it
doesn't mean that, it doesn't help the packaging/expectations discussion.

It's of course fine that one can hand-compile a smaller than standard
but still useful subset.  But that's entirely different from the
definition of normal.

>> On a NetBSD 6 i386 system, the size of the ruby193-base
>> binary package (as installed) is 25 MB (vs 15 MB for the git base
>> package, which lacks gitk and docs).  (Presently, the git base package
>> defaults to requiring python and installing the git_remote_helpers, but
>> I think that's a bug.)  perl is 54 MB.
>
> That's only the default, if the default doesn't suit you, don't use
> the default.

It's not about what I want.  It's about making choices that affect other
people, and trying to find a plan that will be overall reasonable;
that's the essence of stewardship in packaging.  Compiling for just
myself is far easier.



[-- Attachment #2: Type: application/pgp-signature, Size: 194 bytes --]

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-06  6:44           ` Jeff King
  2013-06-06  6:48             ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06 17:21             ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-06 17:40               ` Jeff King
  2013-06-06 18:32               ` Felipe Contreras
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-06 17:21 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jeff King; +Cc: Felipe Contreras, Johannes Sixt, git

Jeff King <peff@peff.net> writes:

> On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 01:41:05AM -0500, Felipe Contreras wrote:
>
>> > Thanks. I wasn't quite clear on how the signal handling worked on
>> > Windows, but from your description, I agree there is not any point in
>> > running the test at all.
>> 
>> Shouldn't we clarify that Git exit codes only work on UNIX-like
>> operating systems?
>
> Clarify where? My impression is that this issue is well-known in the
> msys world, and it is a platform issue, not a git issue.

I actually was scratching my head while reading "the implementation
of raise() just calls exit(3)." part, in this:

> The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
> action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
> implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).

After a bit of web searching, it seems to me that this behaviour of
raise() is in msvcrt, and compat/mingw.c::mingw_raise() just calls
that.  In other words, "the implementation of raise()" is at an even
lower level than mingw/msys, and I would agree that it is a platform
issue.

> If somebody wants to write a note somewhere in the git
> documentation, that's fine with me, but I'm not clear on exactly
> what it would even say.

I agree with both points.  I can suggest to clarify the log message
a bit with "the implementation of raise() in msvcrt (Microsoft C
Runtime library) just calls exit(3)", but that does not address the
end-user documentation issue.

I tried to summarize the issue for end-user documentation and came
up with this:

    The Git implementation on MinGW exits with status code 3 upon
    receiving an uncaught process-terminating signal, just like any
    program that link with msvcrt (Microsoft C Runtime library)
    whose raise() implementation just calls exit(3).  This is
    different from Git on POSIX, which reports a death by receiving
    a signal with the exit status code (128 + signal number).

But when stated this way, it feels that it belongs to Msysgit
documentation, not ours, at least to me.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-06 17:21             ` Junio C Hamano
@ 2013-06-06 17:40               ` Jeff King
  2013-06-07  6:22                 ` Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-07 10:12                 ` Erik Faye-Lund
  2013-06-06 18:32               ` Felipe Contreras
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Jeff King @ 2013-06-06 17:40 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano; +Cc: Felipe Contreras, Johannes Sixt, git

On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 10:21:47AM -0700, Junio C Hamano wrote:

> > The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
> > action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
> > implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
> 
> After a bit of web searching, it seems to me that this behaviour of
> raise() is in msvcrt, and compat/mingw.c::mingw_raise() just calls
> that.  In other words, "the implementation of raise()" is at an even
> lower level than mingw/msys, and I would agree that it is a platform
> issue.

Yeah, if it were mingw_raise responsible for this, I would suggest using
the POSIX shell "128+sig" instead. We could potentially check for
SIG_DFL[1] mingw_raise and intercept and exit there. I don't know if
that would create headaches or confusion for other msys programs,
though. I'd leave that up to the msysgit people to decide whether it is
worth the trouble.

[1] I'd use sigaction to do that on POSIX, but I would not be surprised
    to find that there is no support for it in msys. :)

> I tried to summarize the issue for end-user documentation and came
> up with this:
> 
>     The Git implementation on MinGW exits with status code 3 upon
>     receiving an uncaught process-terminating signal, just like any
>     program that link with msvcrt (Microsoft C Runtime library)
>     whose raise() implementation just calls exit(3).  This is
>     different from Git on POSIX, which reports a death by receiving
>     a signal with the exit status code (128 + signal number).
> 
> But when stated this way, it feels that it belongs to Msysgit
> documentation, not ours, at least to me.

Yeah, I think I agree.

-Peff

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 16:09       ` David Lang
@ 2013-06-06 18:16         ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 20:29         ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-06 18:16 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: David Lang
  Cc: Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder,
	Thomas Rast, René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 11:09 AM, David Lang <david@lang.hm> wrote:
> On Thu, 6 Jun 2013, Felipe Contreras wrote:
>
>> In the end my point remains unchanged; Perl is declining, so it would
>> be wise for the future to use another scripting language instead.
>
>
> Perl use may or may not be declining (depending on how you measure it), but
> are you really willing to take on the task of re-writing everything that's
> in Perl into another language and force all developers of scripts to learn
> that other language?

But that's exactly what we are asking the newer generations of
developers; to learn another language. Fewer and fewer new
contributors will come with knowledge of Perl.

> What are the odds that the 'newer' language that you pick is going to pull a
> "python 3" on you?

Ruby 2 speaks volumes on that front.

> There have been a very large number of scripting languages show up, make a
> lot of press, and then fade in favor of other languages while Perl has
> continued. It's not the sexy languange nowdays, but it's there, reliable,
> and used so heavily that there's really no chance of it dissapearing in the
> forseable future.

Yet it's declining, more and more every year. And the more the time
goes by, the more we hurt ourselves.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 17:16       ` Greg Troxel
@ 2013-06-06 18:24         ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 21:05         ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-06 18:24 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Greg Troxel
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 12:16 PM, Greg Troxel <gdt@ir.bbn.com> wrote:
>
> Felipe Contreras <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> writes:
>
>> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 9:54 AM, Greg Troxel <gdt@ir.bbn.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> git is a core tool that people use on almost the smallest of boxes,
>>> perhaps even replacing rcs for managing local config files.  On such
>>> machines, even perl may be large, but a second scripting language seems
>>> excessive.
>>
>> You can compile Git without any of them.
>
> That ignores the 99% of people who use packaged versions.

The 99% of people who use packaged versions wouldn't care about the
additional dependency.

>>> On a NetBSD 6 i386 system, the size of the ruby193-base
>>> binary package (as installed) is 25 MB (vs 15 MB for the git base
>>> package, which lacks gitk and docs).  (Presently, the git base package
>>> defaults to requiring python and installing the git_remote_helpers, but
>>> I think that's a bug.)  perl is 54 MB.
>>
>> That's only the default, if the default doesn't suit you, don't use
>> the default.
>
> It's not about what I want.

It is exactly about what you want.

You use the argument that 99% of the people use packaged versions, yet
you ignore the fact that 99% of the people don't care about a single
extra dependency (specially one that would be transitory). It is all
about 1% of the users, in fact, not even that, because of this 1% of
users who dread extra dependencies, most of them would be happy that
it's only temporary, and eventually a heavier dependency would be
replaced with a lighter one. It is for all intents and purposes only
you, the person you are speaking on behalf of.

If the Git project considers a new dependency that would be needed in
addition to Perl for a finite period of time, your argument does
absolutely nothing to block this route.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-06 17:21             ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-06 17:40               ` Jeff King
@ 2013-06-06 18:32               ` Felipe Contreras
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-06 18:32 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano; +Cc: Jeff King, Johannes Sixt, git

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 12:21 PM, Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> wrote:
> Jeff King <peff@peff.net> writes:

>> If somebody wants to write a note somewhere in the git
>> documentation, that's fine with me, but I'm not clear on exactly
>> what it would even say.
>
> I agree with both points.  I can suggest to clarify the log message
> a bit with "the implementation of raise() in msvcrt (Microsoft C
> Runtime library) just calls exit(3)", but that does not address the
> end-user documentation issue.
>
> I tried to summarize the issue for end-user documentation and came
> up with this:
>
>     The Git implementation on MinGW

That's not accurate at all. MinGW is essentially a compiler for
Windows. It doesn't matter if you use MinGW, Visual C++, or any other
compiler for Windows, the result would be the same.

> But when stated this way, it feels that it belongs to Msysgit
> documentation, not ours, at least to me.

Are we saying then that Git doesn't support Windows? That wouldn't be
wise considering it's one of the most widely used reasons to argue
that Git is not a good choice of a SCM; lack of Windows support.

The truth of the matter is that exit codes are platform-dependent. Period.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-05  4:13   ` Michael Haggerty
  2013-06-05 17:41     ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-06 12:52     ` Matthieu Moy
@ 2013-06-06 19:48     ` Thomas Ferris Nicolaisen
  2 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Thomas Ferris Nicolaisen @ 2013-06-06 19:48 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Michael Haggerty
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy, Felipe Contreras,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Wed, Jun 5, 2013 at 6:13 AM, Michael Haggerty <mhagger@alum.mit.edu> wrote:
>
> But my main point is that I think it would be easier to phase out
> contrib/ if there were a good alternate way of providing visibility to
> "satellite" projects.  The relevant Git wiki page [1] is the most likely
> candidate, but it is a bit overwhelming due to its size, it has fallen
> into disuse because it was broken for such a long time, and it is not
> prominently linked to from git-scm.com.  If it were curated a bit, it
> would help users find the best ancillary tools quickly.  Perhaps ranking
> the tools based on the results of the Git user surveys would help bring
> the most popular to the top of each category.
>

One idea here could be to mirror what the libgit2 project [1] (and many
others) are doing on GitHub. Use the organization unit [2] as an umbrella
for the contrib projects. If necessary, put a pretty web-page on top [3].

Of course you don't have to tie it to GitHub, but they do have some nice
mechanisms for showing off popularity (stars and forks).

I heard that clojure/contrib [4] went through a big clean-up recently,
although I'm not sure if there was an equivalent reasoning behind it. But
their guide-lines on what should go into contrib may have some good
ideas [5].

[1] https://github.com/libgit2
[2] https://github.com/git
[3] http://libgit2.github.com/
[4] http://dev.clojure.org/display/design/Where+Did+Clojure.Contrib+Go
[5] http://dev.clojure.org/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=5767464

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 20:29         ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-06 20:19           ` David Lang
  2013-06-07 14:24             ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 19:21             ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: David Lang @ 2013-06-06 20:19 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: Felipe Contreras, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Fri, 7 Jun 2013, Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:

> David Lang wrote:
>> Perl use may or may not be declining (depending on how you measure it), but
>> are you really willing to take on the task of re-writing everything that's
>> in Perl into another language and force all developers of scripts to learn
>> that other language? what's the ROI of this?
>
> Let's not talk hypotheticals.  git-svn.perl (+ perl/SVN/*.pl) is
> absolutely massive.  It's an incredibly useful tool in that it
> actually works, and that there is nothing replacing it in the
> foreseeable future.  This monster was written almost entirely by one
> brilliant person, and nobody is going to rewrite it.  We don't start a
> huge discussion about what languages are "approved" before accepting
> such a contribution: if the contributor wants to write something in a
> dominant language (Perl in this case), and it's going to be useful, we
> merge it.  End of story.

Well, Felipe is saying that Perl is dieing and we should re-write everything 
that exists in Perl to Ruby.

Part of the reason for the discussion now is because not having similar 
discussions in the past have caused problems.

> All this planning is a colossal waste of time, in my opinion.
>
>> Perl isn't going to disappear any time soon. What makes you think that
>> whatever language you pick to replace Perl is going to be more stable than
>> Perl is?
>
> Why are we discussing something that is indeterminate?  It is
> impossible to foresee the future, but that is no reason to freeze
> _present_ development.

and it's not a reason to throw away existing stuff based on the argument that 
Perl is dieing

>> There have been a very large number of scripting languages show up, make a
>> lot of press, and then fade in favor of other languages while Perl has
>> continued. It's not the sexy languange nowdays, but it's there, reliable,
>> and used so heavily that there's really no chance of it dissapearing in the
>> forseable future.
>
> Nobody claimed that "press coverage" is a good metric.  We can only
> talk about facts, and Felipe already showed you a TIOBE index graph.
> If you have overwhelming _evidence_ that Ruby is a weak language that
> will die soon, share it: otherwise, I see no value in this discussion.

TIOBE index graph is "press coverage" as far as I'm concerned.

I'm not saying that Ruby in particular has a fatal flaw, I'm just questioning 
the "Perl is dead, re-write everything in Ruby" mantra.

The language that you choose to use when writing a new application is related to 
things related to that type of application.

Ruby is not an extremely common language for sysadmins to use.

Perl remains a common language for these sorts of tasks, even if it's not used 
for user visible applications.

Arguing that Perl is dieing, we need to abandon it is just wrong.

David Lang

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 16:09       ` David Lang
  2013-06-06 18:16         ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06 20:29         ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-06 20:19           ` David Lang
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-06 20:29 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: David Lang
  Cc: Felipe Contreras, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

David Lang wrote:
> Perl use may or may not be declining (depending on how you measure it), but
> are you really willing to take on the task of re-writing everything that's
> in Perl into another language and force all developers of scripts to learn
> that other language? what's the ROI of this?

Let's not talk hypotheticals.  git-svn.perl (+ perl/SVN/*.pl) is
absolutely massive.  It's an incredibly useful tool in that it
actually works, and that there is nothing replacing it in the
foreseeable future.  This monster was written almost entirely by one
brilliant person, and nobody is going to rewrite it.  We don't start a
huge discussion about what languages are "approved" before accepting
such a contribution: if the contributor wants to write something in a
dominant language (Perl in this case), and it's going to be useful, we
merge it.  End of story.

All this planning is a colossal waste of time, in my opinion.

> Perl isn't going to disappear any time soon. What makes you think that
> whatever language you pick to replace Perl is going to be more stable than
> Perl is?

Why are we discussing something that is indeterminate?  It is
impossible to foresee the future, but that is no reason to freeze
_present_ development.

> and, like the parent poster, by 'stable' I mean from the compatibility point
> of view.

Various programming languages have different philosophies, and have
grown in different ways.  What matters is that some of them have a
large number of users, and we're talking about one such example.

> What are the odds that the 'newer' language that you pick is going to pull a
> "python 3" on you?

This has to be a rhetorical, because I don't imagine you expect anyone
to predict the future.  As Felipe already pointed out Ruby 2.0 is a
good sign.

> There have been a very large number of scripting languages show up, make a
> lot of press, and then fade in favor of other languages while Perl has
> continued. It's not the sexy languange nowdays, but it's there, reliable,
> and used so heavily that there's really no chance of it dissapearing in the
> forseable future.

Nobody claimed that "press coverage" is a good metric.  We can only
talk about facts, and Felipe already showed you a TIOBE index graph.
If you have overwhelming _evidence_ that Ruby is a weak language that
will die soon, share it: otherwise, I see no value in this discussion.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 16:22     ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Johannes Schindelin
@ 2013-06-06 20:40       ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07  3:25         ` Johannes Schindelin
  2013-06-08  2:17       ` Duy Nguyen
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-06 20:40 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Schindelin
  Cc: Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder,
	Thomas Rast, René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c Duy, Felipe Contreras,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Johannes Schindelin wrote:
> My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
> for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).

Nevertheless, we had to do it, and we did it.  We will do it again, if
we get enough important code written in Ruby.

> As you can see from the commit history, I was the primary force behind
> trying to get everything "core" in Git away from requiring scripting
> languages (I think it is an awesome thing to provide APIs for as many
> languages as possible, but a not-so-cool thing to use more than one
> language in the core code). It does not seem that anybody picked up that
> task when I left, though.

Rewriting everything in C?  Is anyone bored enough to pick up this
task?  Bourne shell is a great language for prototyping; git-rebase.sh
(and friends), git-stash.sh, git-pull.sh are doing just fine.  Sure,
it makes sense to do heavy-lifting in C, and this is happening as it
has always been happening (remember git-commit.sh?).  If you followed
the list emails, you'd know that Felipe is looking into delegating
large portions of the work done by git-rebase.sh to sequencer.c.

Anyway, all this talk about some hypothetical ideas just bores me.
What matters is what is currently happening.  And nobody is actively
rewriting the "core in Git" in C, so I don't see the point of
discussing anything but patches.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06  7:46       ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-06 12:24         ` Barry Fishman
@ 2013-06-06 20:41         ` Charles McGarvey
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Charles McGarvey @ 2013-06-06 20:41 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: demerphq, Junio C Hamano, Git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder,
	Thomas Rast, René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

[-- Attachment #1: Type: text/plain, Size: 2543 bytes --]

On 06/06/2013 01:46 AM, Felipe Contreras wrote:
> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 2:26 AM, demerphq <demerphq@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Good thing you are being objective and leaving out the Python 3.0
>> mess, the long legacy of backwards compatibility in the Perl
>> community, the active community behind it, its extensive portability
>> support, and fail to mention the lack of an equivalent to CPAN. We
>> wouldn't want facts to get in the way of a personal bias would we?
> 
> None of that has anything to do with Perl's popularity.
> 
>> Just thought I'd push back on the FUD. People have been saying Perl is
>> going away for decades...
> 
> Perl has been going away for the last decade [1], and will continue to
> go away. Perl is going away, and that an undeniable fact, and if you
> are not interested in discussing on the basis of reality, I'm not
> interested in discussing with you.
> 
> [1] http://www.tiobe.com/content/paperinfo/tpci/images/tpci_trends.png

The linchpin of your argument is that Perl is dying.  Let's assume that the
TIOBE index is a reliable basis for making business decisions--it's not, but
let's pretend--the graph you linked to doesn't even seem to support your
conclusion (or am I missing something?).  It looks like Perl's popularity has
pretty much been constant for at least two years.  It's apparently not
increasing in popularity, but this isn't an electrocardiogram (i.e.
flat-lining is not dead or even dying).  The same graph shows that Ruby's
popularity also hasn't changed very much since 2007 after its initial surge.

Now, it's probably too off-topic to pick apart TIOBE's methodology here, but
suffice it to say that, like any trend indicator, it's only as useful as your
knowledge of its limitations, and this has been discussed enough elsewhere.

It's true that Perl isn't soon going to win any trendiness awards, but the
same reasons that made Perl a good choice for git so many years ago are still
there and then some.  You would probably also be surprised at the number of
new kids learning Perl.

I guess I just denied the "undeniable fact" that Perl is going away, so maybe
I'm one of those with whom you do not want to discuss this, but, for my part,
I am willing to consider other evidence for the claim.  As I pointed out, the
evidence shown so far (one reference to the TIOBE index) isn't nearly enough
to settle the matter.  I also apologize for dragging this out if this thread
is judged to not be worth a whole lot.

-- 
Charles McGarvey


[-- Attachment #2: OpenPGP digital signature --]
[-- Type: application/pgp-signature, Size: 198 bytes --]

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 17:16       ` Greg Troxel
  2013-06-06 18:24         ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-06 21:05         ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-06 21:31           ` Dependencies and packaging (Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/) Jonathan Nieder
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-06 21:05 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Greg Troxel
  Cc: Felipe Contreras, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

Greg Troxel wrote:
> It's not about what I want.  It's about making choices that affect other
> people, and trying to find a plan that will be overall reasonable;
> that's the essence of stewardship in packaging.  Compiling for just
> myself is far easier.

Have you asked the SBCL or Google-Chrome package maintainers what they
have to deal with?  I believe they're packaging nightmares.  GHC/
Haskell projects aren't far behind.  Git is probably the _last_ thing
to be complaining about when it comes to packaging.

Sure, people want to run Git on embedded devices like Rpi.  The core
is already in C and Bourne Shell, and I don't see anyone rewriting
that in Ruby.  No cause for concern.

> That ignores the 99% of people who use packaged versions.  The question
> is really "Should the standared approach for building be to use or not
> use dependency X?".  Really this should be expressed in the README, and
> it creates expectations for someone who just installs the git package in
> terms of whether pieces of functionality are there.  Packagers generally
> should be reading the README and including required/recommended
> dependencies and not including optional dependencies (in the main
> package).  The information in INSTALL is pretty reasonable, but it
> doesn't really clearly say "if you hand someone git built without perl,
> it is { perfectly ok but missing a fringe optional feature | deficient
> because "git add -p" won't work }.   I'm leaning towards the "deficient"
> camp.

So whom is this extra dependency affecting, if 99% of users are using
packaged versions?  So, it's just extra burden for the package
maintainers (and users on source-based distributions)?  git-svn and
git-send-email are already separate packages on Ubuntu/Debian because
they depend on lots of CPAN packages that can be non-trivial to
install for new users.  If we do get one important Ruby script, ship
it as a separate package: done?

At the moment, there's just contrib/git-related that depends on ruby.
Can we just stop planning centuries in advance, and tackle the problem
when it arises?  It remains to be determined whether or not git.git
will grow a healthy ruby sub-ecosystem.  If it does, package
maintainers will be inconvenienced slightly.  Otherwise, we'll just
throw out the ruby code that's rotting in our tree, and get on with
our lives.

The direction of the project is not decided on the basis of some vague
future packaging expectations.  It's decided on the basis of what
patches come in from contributors, and everything else is secondary.
If people want to write ruby, they will write ruby.  Whether or not
the git project welcomes their contributions.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Dependencies and packaging (Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/)
  2013-06-06 21:05         ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-06 21:31           ` Jonathan Nieder
  2013-06-07 19:29             ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Jonathan Nieder @ 2013-06-06 21:31 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: Greg Troxel, Felipe Contreras, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Thomas Rast, René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:

>                                      Git is probably the _last_ thing
> to be complaining about when it comes to packaging.

It would be nice if contrib/ files supported the usual "make; make
install; make clean" targets.  That's missing functionality that does
matter to at least one packager.

It would be nice if the dependencies associated to each piece of
functionality or makefile flag were documented more clearly.
Currently when e.g. features of gitweb gain dependencies I don't
notice until the testsuite fails.

Jonathan

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 20:40       ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07  3:25         ` Johannes Schindelin
  2013-06-07 15:20           ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 19:14           ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Schindelin @ 2013-06-07  3:25 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder,
	Thomas Rast, René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c Duy, Felipe Contreras,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Hi Ram,

On Fri, 7 Jun 2013, Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:

> Johannes Schindelin wrote:
> > My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
> > for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).
> 
> Nevertheless, we had to do it, and we did it.

That is not quite correct. *I* did it. Not *we*. And I will not do it
again.

> We will do it again, if we get enough important code written in Ruby.

I am a bit bored by this hypothetical talk. This hypothetical "we will do
it again", to be precise. Given my experience, it would be very painful if
"enough important code" was written in Ruby. Nobody would help me "do it
again". Just like nobody helps right now to upgrade to a newer Perl. Feel
free to prove me wrong. Until that time, I will firmly believe that there
is no "we will do it again".

So here is a chance to prevent that: not repeat the mistake, and stay away
from language hell by avoiding to require yet another language.

> > As you can see from the commit history, I was the primary force behind
> > trying to get everything "core" in Git away from requiring scripting
> > languages (I think it is an awesome thing to provide APIs for as many
> > languages as possible, but a not-so-cool thing to use more than one
> > language in the core code). It does not seem that anybody picked up
> > that task when I left, though.
> 
> Rewriting everything in C?  Is anyone bored enough to pick up this task?
> Bourne shell is a great language for prototyping; git-rebase.sh (and
> friends), git-stash.sh, git-pull.sh are doing just fine.  Sure, it makes
> sense to do heavy-lifting in C, and this is happening as it has always
> been happening (remember git-commit.sh?).  If you followed the list
> emails, you'd know that Felipe is looking into delegating large portions
> of the work done by git-rebase.sh to sequencer.c.

As you know, there are very good reasons why I do not follow those mails.

> Anyway, all this talk about some hypothetical ideas just bores me.
> What matters is what is currently happening.  And nobody is actively
> rewriting the "core in Git" in C, so I don't see the point of
> discussing anything but patches.

Exactly. Nobody really cares about keeping Git portable enough. Hence my
impression that this idea to start requiring yet another language for core
parts of Git is a bit misguided, and only logical from the point of view:
"If you don't like it, why don't you install Linux?" (which, just in case
you wondered, is a pretty naive way of looking at the real world).

Ciao,
Johannes

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-06 17:40               ` Jeff King
@ 2013-06-07  6:22                 ` Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-07 10:12                 ` Erik Faye-Lund
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Sixt @ 2013-06-07  6:22 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jeff King; +Cc: Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, git

Am 6/6/2013 19:40, schrieb Jeff King:
> On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 10:21:47AM -0700, Junio C Hamano wrote:
> 
>>> The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
>>> action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
>>> implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
>>
>> After a bit of web searching, it seems to me that this behaviour of
>> raise() is in msvcrt, and compat/mingw.c::mingw_raise() just calls
>> that.  In other words, "the implementation of raise()" is at an even
>> lower level than mingw/msys, and I would agree that it is a platform
>> issue.
> 
> Yeah, if it were mingw_raise responsible for this, I would suggest using
> the POSIX shell "128+sig" instead. We could potentially check for
> SIG_DFL[1] mingw_raise and intercept and exit there. I don't know if
> that would create headaches or confusion for other msys programs,
> though. I'd leave that up to the msysgit people to decide whether it is
> worth the trouble.

Even if we move the signal emulation closer to POSIX in the way that you
suggested (if that were possible, I haven't checked), the emulation is
still not complete, because we would have addressed only raise().
Therefore, personally I would like to delay the issue until there is a
user (script) that depends on POSIXly exit codes.

As far as t0005.2 is concerned, its the best to just concede that Windows
does not have POSIX-like behavior as far as signals are concerned, and
skip the test.

We could also sweep the issue under the rug with the patch below, which
works because SIGALRM does not exist in MSVCRT and is handled entirely by
compat/mingw.c. But it goes into the wrong direction, IMO.

diff --git a/t/t0005-signals.sh b/t/t0005-signals.sh
index ad9e604..68b6c3b 100755
--- a/t/t0005-signals.sh
+++ b/t/t0005-signals.sh
@@ -12,9 +12,8 @@ EOF
 test_expect_success 'sigchain works' '
 	test-sigchain >actual
 	case "$?" in
-	143) true ;; # POSIX w/ SIGTERM=15
-	271) true ;; # ksh w/ SIGTERM=15
-	  3) true ;; # Windows
+	142) true ;; # POSIX w/ SIGALRM=14
+	270) true ;; # ksh w/ SIGTERM=14
 	  *) false ;;
 	esac &&
 	test_cmp expect actual
@@ -23,8 +22,8 @@ test_expect_success 'sigchain works' '
 test_expect_success 'signals are propagated using shell convention' '
 	# we use exec here to avoid any sub-shell interpretation
 	# of the exit code
-	git config alias.sigterm "!exec test-sigchain" &&
-	test_expect_code 143 git sigterm
+	git config alias.sigalrm "!exec test-sigchain" &&
+	test_expect_code 142 git sigalrm
 '

 test_done
diff --git a/test-sigchain.c b/test-sigchain.c
index 42db234..0233a39 100644
--- a/test-sigchain.c
+++ b/test-sigchain.c
@@ -14,9 +14,9 @@ X(three)
 #undef X

 int main(int argc, char **argv) {
-	sigchain_push(SIGTERM, one);
-	sigchain_push(SIGTERM, two);
-	sigchain_push(SIGTERM, three);
-	raise(SIGTERM);
+	sigchain_push(SIGALRM, one);
+	sigchain_push(SIGALRM, two);
+	sigchain_push(SIGALRM, three);
+	raise(SIGALRM);
 	return 0;
 }

^ permalink raw reply related	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-06  6:34     ` [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-06  6:37       ` Jeff King
@ 2013-06-07 10:01       ` Erik Faye-Lund
  2013-06-07 10:03         ` Erik Faye-Lund
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Erik Faye-Lund @ 2013-06-07 10:01 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Sixt; +Cc: Jeff King, Junio C Hamano, git

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 8:34 AM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
> From: Johannes Sixt <j6t@kdbg.org>
>
> The test case depends on that test-sigchain can commit suicide by a call
> to raise(SIGTERM) in a way that run-command.c::wait_or_whine() can detect
> as death through a signal. There are no POSIX signals on Windows, and a
> sufficiently close emulation is not available in the Microsoft C runtime
> (and probably not even possible).
>
> The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
> action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
> implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
>
> We could check for exit code 3 in addition to 143, but that would miss
> the point of the test entirely. Hence, just skip it on Windows.
>

Huh? We do "exit(128 + sigint);" in mingw_raise these days, no?

Or is the signal triggered from a non-git process?

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-07 10:01       ` Erik Faye-Lund
@ 2013-06-07 10:03         ` Erik Faye-Lund
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Erik Faye-Lund @ 2013-06-07 10:03 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Sixt; +Cc: Jeff King, Junio C Hamano, git

On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 12:01 PM, Erik Faye-Lund <kusmabite@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 8:34 AM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
>> From: Johannes Sixt <j6t@kdbg.org>
>>
>> The test case depends on that test-sigchain can commit suicide by a call
>> to raise(SIGTERM) in a way that run-command.c::wait_or_whine() can detect
>> as death through a signal. There are no POSIX signals on Windows, and a
>> sufficiently close emulation is not available in the Microsoft C runtime
>> (and probably not even possible).
>>
>> The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
>> action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
>> implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
>>
>> We could check for exit code 3 in addition to 143, but that would miss
>> the point of the test entirely. Hence, just skip it on Windows.
>>
>
> Huh? We do "exit(128 + sigint);" in mingw_raise these days, no?
>
> Or is the signal triggered from a non-git process?

Argh, I'm blind. Yeah, SIGTERM, not SIGINT...

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-06 17:40               ` Jeff King
  2013-06-07  6:22                 ` Johannes Sixt
@ 2013-06-07 10:12                 ` Erik Faye-Lund
  2013-06-07 10:24                   ` Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-09  0:18                   ` [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows Jeff King
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Erik Faye-Lund @ 2013-06-07 10:12 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jeff King; +Cc: Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, Johannes Sixt, git

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 7:40 PM, Jeff King <peff@peff.net> wrote:
> On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 10:21:47AM -0700, Junio C Hamano wrote:
>
>> > The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
>> > action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
>> > implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
>>
>> After a bit of web searching, it seems to me that this behaviour of
>> raise() is in msvcrt, and compat/mingw.c::mingw_raise() just calls
>> that.  In other words, "the implementation of raise()" is at an even
>> lower level than mingw/msys, and I would agree that it is a platform
>> issue.
>
> Yeah, if it were mingw_raise responsible for this, I would suggest using
> the POSIX shell "128+sig" instead. We could potentially check for
> SIG_DFL[1] mingw_raise and intercept and exit there. I don't know if
> that would create headaches or confusion for other msys programs,
> though. I'd leave that up to the msysgit people to decide whether it is
> worth the trouble.
>

...and here's the code to do just that:

diff --git a/compat/mingw.c b/compat/mingw.c
index b295e2f..8b3c1b4 100644
--- a/compat/mingw.c
+++ b/compat/mingw.c
@@ -1573,7 +1573,8 @@ static HANDLE timer_event;
 static HANDLE timer_thread;
 static int timer_interval;
 static int one_shot;
-static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL;
+static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL,
+    sigterm_fn = SIG_DFL;

 /* The timer works like this:
  * The thread, ticktack(), is a trivial routine that most of the time
@@ -1688,6 +1689,10 @@ sig_handler_t mingw_signal(int sig,
sig_handler_t handler)
 		sigint_fn = handler;
 		break;

+	case SIGTERM:
+		sigterm_fn = handler;
+		break;
+
 	default:
 		return signal(sig, handler);
 	}
@@ -1715,6 +1720,13 @@ int mingw_raise(int sig)
 			sigint_fn(SIGINT);
 		return 0;

+	case SIGTERM:
+		if (sigterm_fn == SIG_DFL)
+			exit(128 + SIGTERM);
+		else if (sigterm_fn != SIG_IGN)
+			sigterm_fn(SIGTERM);
+		return 0;
+
 	default:
 		return raise(sig);
 	}

^ permalink raw reply related	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-07 10:12                 ` Erik Faye-Lund
@ 2013-06-07 10:24                   ` Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-07 12:00                     ` Erik Faye-Lund
  2013-06-09  0:18                   ` [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows Jeff King
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Sixt @ 2013-06-07 10:24 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: kusmabite; +Cc: Jeff King, Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, git

Am 6/7/2013 12:12, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 7:40 PM, Jeff King <peff@peff.net> wrote:
>> On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 10:21:47AM -0700, Junio C Hamano wrote:
>>
>>>> The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
>>>> action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
>>>> implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
>>>
>>> After a bit of web searching, it seems to me that this behaviour of
>>> raise() is in msvcrt, and compat/mingw.c::mingw_raise() just calls
>>> that.  In other words, "the implementation of raise()" is at an even
>>> lower level than mingw/msys, and I would agree that it is a platform
>>> issue.
>>
>> Yeah, if it were mingw_raise responsible for this, I would suggest using
>> the POSIX shell "128+sig" instead. We could potentially check for
>> SIG_DFL[1] mingw_raise and intercept and exit there. I don't know if
>> that would create headaches or confusion for other msys programs,
>> though. I'd leave that up to the msysgit people to decide whether it is
>> worth the trouble.
>>
> 
> ...and here's the code to do just that:
> 
> diff --git a/compat/mingw.c b/compat/mingw.c
> index b295e2f..8b3c1b4 100644
> --- a/compat/mingw.c
> +++ b/compat/mingw.c
> @@ -1573,7 +1573,8 @@ static HANDLE timer_event;
>  static HANDLE timer_thread;
>  static int timer_interval;
>  static int one_shot;
> -static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL;
> +static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL,
> +    sigterm_fn = SIG_DFL;
> 
>  /* The timer works like this:
>   * The thread, ticktack(), is a trivial routine that most of the time
> @@ -1688,6 +1689,10 @@ sig_handler_t mingw_signal(int sig,
> sig_handler_t handler)
>  		sigint_fn = handler;
>  		break;
> 
> +	case SIGTERM:
> +		sigterm_fn = handler;
> +		break;
> +
>  	default:
>  		return signal(sig, handler);
>  	}
> @@ -1715,6 +1720,13 @@ int mingw_raise(int sig)
>  			sigint_fn(SIGINT);
>  		return 0;
> 
> +	case SIGTERM:
> +		if (sigterm_fn == SIG_DFL)
> +			exit(128 + SIGTERM);
> +		else if (sigterm_fn != SIG_IGN)
> +			sigterm_fn(SIGTERM);
> +		return 0;
> +
>  	default:
>  		return raise(sig);
>  	}

That's pointless and does not work. The handler would only be called when
raise() is called, but not when a SIGTERM is received, e.g., via Ctrl-C
from the command line, because that route ends up in MSVCRT, which does
not know about this handler.

If you want to follow this route, you must emulate everything that MSVCRT
already does for us, and that's quite a lot, in particular, when some form
of thread safety is required.

-- Hannes

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-07 10:24                   ` Johannes Sixt
@ 2013-06-07 12:00                     ` Erik Faye-Lund
  2013-06-07 12:19                       ` Johannes Sixt
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Erik Faye-Lund @ 2013-06-07 12:00 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Sixt; +Cc: Jeff King, Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, git

On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 12:24 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
> Am 6/7/2013 12:12, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
>> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 7:40 PM, Jeff King <peff@peff.net> wrote:
>>> On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 10:21:47AM -0700, Junio C Hamano wrote:
>>>
>>>>> The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
>>>>> action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
>>>>> implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
>>>>
>>>> After a bit of web searching, it seems to me that this behaviour of
>>>> raise() is in msvcrt, and compat/mingw.c::mingw_raise() just calls
>>>> that.  In other words, "the implementation of raise()" is at an even
>>>> lower level than mingw/msys, and I would agree that it is a platform
>>>> issue.
>>>
>>> Yeah, if it were mingw_raise responsible for this, I would suggest using
>>> the POSIX shell "128+sig" instead. We could potentially check for
>>> SIG_DFL[1] mingw_raise and intercept and exit there. I don't know if
>>> that would create headaches or confusion for other msys programs,
>>> though. I'd leave that up to the msysgit people to decide whether it is
>>> worth the trouble.
>>>
>>
>> ...and here's the code to do just that:
>>
>> diff --git a/compat/mingw.c b/compat/mingw.c
>> index b295e2f..8b3c1b4 100644
>> --- a/compat/mingw.c
>> +++ b/compat/mingw.c
>> @@ -1573,7 +1573,8 @@ static HANDLE timer_event;
>>  static HANDLE timer_thread;
>>  static int timer_interval;
>>  static int one_shot;
>> -static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL;
>> +static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL,
>> +    sigterm_fn = SIG_DFL;
>>
>>  /* The timer works like this:
>>   * The thread, ticktack(), is a trivial routine that most of the time
>> @@ -1688,6 +1689,10 @@ sig_handler_t mingw_signal(int sig,
>> sig_handler_t handler)
>>               sigint_fn = handler;
>>               break;
>>
>> +     case SIGTERM:
>> +             sigterm_fn = handler;
>> +             break;
>> +
>>       default:
>>               return signal(sig, handler);
>>       }
>> @@ -1715,6 +1720,13 @@ int mingw_raise(int sig)
>>                       sigint_fn(SIGINT);
>>               return 0;
>>
>> +     case SIGTERM:
>> +             if (sigterm_fn == SIG_DFL)
>> +                     exit(128 + SIGTERM);
>> +             else if (sigterm_fn != SIG_IGN)
>> +                     sigterm_fn(SIGTERM);
>> +             return 0;
>> +
>>       default:
>>               return raise(sig);
>>       }
>
> That's pointless and does not work. The handler would only be called when
> raise() is called, but not when a SIGTERM is received, e.g., via Ctrl-C
> from the command line, because that route ends up in MSVCRT, which does
> not know about this handler.

That's not entirely true. On Windows, there's only *one* way to
generate SIGTERM; "signal(SIGTERM)". Ctrl+C does not generate SIGTERM.
We generate SIGINT on Ctrl+C in mingw_fgetc, but the default Control+C
handler routine calls ExitProcess():
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms683242(v=vs.85).aspx

So I believe this *does* entirely fix SIGTERM (as we currently know
it) on Windows. SIGINT is still not entirely clean, but we can fix
that on a case-by-case basis.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-07 12:00                     ` Erik Faye-Lund
@ 2013-06-07 12:19                       ` Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-07 12:46                         ` Erik Faye-Lund
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Sixt @ 2013-06-07 12:19 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: kusmabite; +Cc: Jeff King, Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, git

Am 6/7/2013 14:00, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 12:24 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
>> Am 6/7/2013 12:12, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
>>> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 7:40 PM, Jeff King <peff@peff.net> wrote:
>>>> On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 10:21:47AM -0700, Junio C Hamano wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>> The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
>>>>>> action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
>>>>>> implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
>>>>>
>>>>> After a bit of web searching, it seems to me that this behaviour of
>>>>> raise() is in msvcrt, and compat/mingw.c::mingw_raise() just calls
>>>>> that.  In other words, "the implementation of raise()" is at an even
>>>>> lower level than mingw/msys, and I would agree that it is a platform
>>>>> issue.
>>>>
>>>> Yeah, if it were mingw_raise responsible for this, I would suggest using
>>>> the POSIX shell "128+sig" instead. We could potentially check for
>>>> SIG_DFL[1] mingw_raise and intercept and exit there. I don't know if
>>>> that would create headaches or confusion for other msys programs,
>>>> though. I'd leave that up to the msysgit people to decide whether it is
>>>> worth the trouble.
>>>>
>>>
>>> ...and here's the code to do just that:
>>>
>>> diff --git a/compat/mingw.c b/compat/mingw.c
>>> index b295e2f..8b3c1b4 100644
>>> --- a/compat/mingw.c
>>> +++ b/compat/mingw.c
>>> @@ -1573,7 +1573,8 @@ static HANDLE timer_event;
>>>  static HANDLE timer_thread;
>>>  static int timer_interval;
>>>  static int one_shot;
>>> -static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL;
>>> +static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL,
>>> +    sigterm_fn = SIG_DFL;
>>>
>>>  /* The timer works like this:
>>>   * The thread, ticktack(), is a trivial routine that most of the time
>>> @@ -1688,6 +1689,10 @@ sig_handler_t mingw_signal(int sig,
>>> sig_handler_t handler)
>>>               sigint_fn = handler;
>>>               break;
>>>
>>> +     case SIGTERM:
>>> +             sigterm_fn = handler;
>>> +             break;
>>> +
>>>       default:
>>>               return signal(sig, handler);
>>>       }
>>> @@ -1715,6 +1720,13 @@ int mingw_raise(int sig)
>>>                       sigint_fn(SIGINT);
>>>               return 0;
>>>
>>> +     case SIGTERM:
>>> +             if (sigterm_fn == SIG_DFL)
>>> +                     exit(128 + SIGTERM);
>>> +             else if (sigterm_fn != SIG_IGN)
>>> +                     sigterm_fn(SIGTERM);
>>> +             return 0;
>>> +
>>>       default:
>>>               return raise(sig);
>>>       }
>>
>> That's pointless and does not work. The handler would only be called when
>> raise() is called, but not when a SIGTERM is received, e.g., via Ctrl-C
>> from the command line, because that route ends up in MSVCRT, which does
>> not know about this handler.
> 
> That's not entirely true. On Windows, there's only *one* way to
> generate SIGTERM; "signal(SIGTERM)". Ctrl+C does not generate SIGTERM.
> We generate SIGINT on Ctrl+C in mingw_fgetc, but the default Control+C
> handler routine calls ExitProcess():
> http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms683242(v=vs.85).aspx

But a call to signal(SIGTERM, my_handler) should divert Ctrl+C to
my_handler. The unpatched version does, because MSVCRT now knows about
my_handler and sets things up so that the event handler calls my_handler.
But your patched version bypasses MSVCRT, and the default (whatever MSVCRT
has set up) happens, and my_handler is not called.

-- Hannes

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-07 12:19                       ` Johannes Sixt
@ 2013-06-07 12:46                         ` Erik Faye-Lund
  2013-06-07 13:07                           ` Johannes Sixt
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Erik Faye-Lund @ 2013-06-07 12:46 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Sixt; +Cc: Jeff King, Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, git

On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 2:19 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
> Am 6/7/2013 14:00, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
>> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 12:24 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
>>> Am 6/7/2013 12:12, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
>>>> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 7:40 PM, Jeff King <peff@peff.net> wrote:
>>>>> On Thu, Jun 06, 2013 at 10:21:47AM -0700, Junio C Hamano wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>> The particular deficiency is that when a signal is raise()d whose SIG_DFL
>>>>>>> action will cause process death (SIGTERM in this case), the
>>>>>>> implementation of raise() just calls exit(3).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> After a bit of web searching, it seems to me that this behaviour of
>>>>>> raise() is in msvcrt, and compat/mingw.c::mingw_raise() just calls
>>>>>> that.  In other words, "the implementation of raise()" is at an even
>>>>>> lower level than mingw/msys, and I would agree that it is a platform
>>>>>> issue.
>>>>>
>>>>> Yeah, if it were mingw_raise responsible for this, I would suggest using
>>>>> the POSIX shell "128+sig" instead. We could potentially check for
>>>>> SIG_DFL[1] mingw_raise and intercept and exit there. I don't know if
>>>>> that would create headaches or confusion for other msys programs,
>>>>> though. I'd leave that up to the msysgit people to decide whether it is
>>>>> worth the trouble.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ...and here's the code to do just that:
>>>>
>>>> diff --git a/compat/mingw.c b/compat/mingw.c
>>>> index b295e2f..8b3c1b4 100644
>>>> --- a/compat/mingw.c
>>>> +++ b/compat/mingw.c
>>>> @@ -1573,7 +1573,8 @@ static HANDLE timer_event;
>>>>  static HANDLE timer_thread;
>>>>  static int timer_interval;
>>>>  static int one_shot;
>>>> -static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL;
>>>> +static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL,
>>>> +    sigterm_fn = SIG_DFL;
>>>>
>>>>  /* The timer works like this:
>>>>   * The thread, ticktack(), is a trivial routine that most of the time
>>>> @@ -1688,6 +1689,10 @@ sig_handler_t mingw_signal(int sig,
>>>> sig_handler_t handler)
>>>>               sigint_fn = handler;
>>>>               break;
>>>>
>>>> +     case SIGTERM:
>>>> +             sigterm_fn = handler;
>>>> +             break;
>>>> +
>>>>       default:
>>>>               return signal(sig, handler);
>>>>       }
>>>> @@ -1715,6 +1720,13 @@ int mingw_raise(int sig)
>>>>                       sigint_fn(SIGINT);
>>>>               return 0;
>>>>
>>>> +     case SIGTERM:
>>>> +             if (sigterm_fn == SIG_DFL)
>>>> +                     exit(128 + SIGTERM);
>>>> +             else if (sigterm_fn != SIG_IGN)
>>>> +                     sigterm_fn(SIGTERM);
>>>> +             return 0;
>>>> +
>>>>       default:
>>>>               return raise(sig);
>>>>       }
>>>
>>> That's pointless and does not work. The handler would only be called when
>>> raise() is called, but not when a SIGTERM is received, e.g., via Ctrl-C
>>> from the command line, because that route ends up in MSVCRT, which does
>>> not know about this handler.
>>
>> That's not entirely true. On Windows, there's only *one* way to
>> generate SIGTERM; "signal(SIGTERM)". Ctrl+C does not generate SIGTERM.
>> We generate SIGINT on Ctrl+C in mingw_fgetc, but the default Control+C
>> handler routine calls ExitProcess():
>> http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms683242(v=vs.85).aspx
>
> But a call to signal(SIGTERM, my_handler) should divert Ctrl+C to
> my_handler. The unpatched version does, because MSVCRT now knows about
> my_handler and sets things up so that the event handler calls my_handler.

No, it does not:
--->8---
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void my_handler(int signum)
{
        printf("signal: %d\n", signum);
        exit(1);
}

int main()
{
        signal(SIGTERM, my_handler);
        while (1);
        return 0;
}
--->8---

This quietly kills the process on Windows with MSVCRT's
signal-implementation. In fact SIGTERM isn't raised on Linux either.
Ctrl+C raises SIGINT, not SIGTERM.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-07 12:46                         ` Erik Faye-Lund
@ 2013-06-07 13:07                           ` Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-07 14:20                             ` Erik Faye-Lund
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Sixt @ 2013-06-07 13:07 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: kusmabite; +Cc: Jeff King, Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, git

Am 6/7/2013 14:46, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 2:19 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
>> Am 6/7/2013 14:00, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
>>> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 12:24 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
>>>> Am 6/7/2013 12:12, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
>>>>> diff --git a/compat/mingw.c b/compat/mingw.c
>>>>> index b295e2f..8b3c1b4 100644
>>>>> --- a/compat/mingw.c
>>>>> +++ b/compat/mingw.c
>>>>> @@ -1573,7 +1573,8 @@ static HANDLE timer_event;
>>>>>  static HANDLE timer_thread;
>>>>>  static int timer_interval;
>>>>>  static int one_shot;
>>>>> -static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL;
>>>>> +static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL,
>>>>> +    sigterm_fn = SIG_DFL;
>>>>>
>>>>>  /* The timer works like this:
>>>>>   * The thread, ticktack(), is a trivial routine that most of the time
>>>>> @@ -1688,6 +1689,10 @@ sig_handler_t mingw_signal(int sig,
>>>>> sig_handler_t handler)
>>>>>               sigint_fn = handler;
>>>>>               break;
>>>>>
>>>>> +     case SIGTERM:
>>>>> +             sigterm_fn = handler;
>>>>> +             break;
>>>>> +
>>>>>       default:
>>>>>               return signal(sig, handler);
>>>>>       }
>>>>> @@ -1715,6 +1720,13 @@ int mingw_raise(int sig)
>>>>>                       sigint_fn(SIGINT);
>>>>>               return 0;
>>>>>
>>>>> +     case SIGTERM:
>>>>> +             if (sigterm_fn == SIG_DFL)
>>>>> +                     exit(128 + SIGTERM);
>>>>> +             else if (sigterm_fn != SIG_IGN)
>>>>> +                     sigterm_fn(SIGTERM);
>>>>> +             return 0;
>>>>> +
>>>>>       default:
>>>>>               return raise(sig);
>>>>>       }
>>>>
>>>> That's pointless and does not work. The handler would only be called when
>>>> raise() is called, but not when a SIGTERM is received, e.g., via Ctrl-C
>>>> from the command line, because that route ends up in MSVCRT, which does
>>>> not know about this handler.
>>>
>>> That's not entirely true. On Windows, there's only *one* way to
>>> generate SIGTERM; "signal(SIGTERM)". Ctrl+C does not generate SIGTERM.
>>> We generate SIGINT on Ctrl+C in mingw_fgetc, but the default Control+C
>>> handler routine calls ExitProcess():
>>> http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms683242(v=vs.85).aspx
>>
>> But a call to signal(SIGTERM, my_handler) should divert Ctrl+C to
>> my_handler. The unpatched version does, because MSVCRT now knows about
>> my_handler and sets things up so that the event handler calls my_handler.
> 
> No, it does not:
> Ctrl+C raises SIGINT, not SIGTERM.

<action type="slap" destination="forehead"/>

You are right. Your change would "fix" SIGTERM as it can be raised only
via raise() on Windows nor can it be caught when a process is killed via
mingw_kill(...,SIGTERM) by another process.

But then the current handling of SIGINT in compat/mingw.c is broken. The
handler is not propagated to MSVCRT, and after a SIGINT handler is
installed, Ctrl+C still terminates the process. No?

BTW, isn't mingw_signal() bogus in that it returns the SIGALRM handler
even if a SIGINT handler is installed?

-- Hannes

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-07 13:07                           ` Johannes Sixt
@ 2013-06-07 14:20                             ` Erik Faye-Lund
  2013-06-10  5:48                               ` [PATCH] mingw: make mingw_signal return the correct handler Johannes Sixt
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Erik Faye-Lund @ 2013-06-07 14:20 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Sixt; +Cc: Jeff King, Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, git

On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 3:07 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
> Am 6/7/2013 14:46, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
>> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 2:19 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
>>> Am 6/7/2013 14:00, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
>>>> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 12:24 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
>>>>> Am 6/7/2013 12:12, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
>>>>>> diff --git a/compat/mingw.c b/compat/mingw.c
>>>>>> index b295e2f..8b3c1b4 100644
>>>>>> --- a/compat/mingw.c
>>>>>> +++ b/compat/mingw.c
>>>>>> @@ -1573,7 +1573,8 @@ static HANDLE timer_event;
>>>>>>  static HANDLE timer_thread;
>>>>>>  static int timer_interval;
>>>>>>  static int one_shot;
>>>>>> -static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL;
>>>>>> +static sig_handler_t timer_fn = SIG_DFL, sigint_fn = SIG_DFL,
>>>>>> +    sigterm_fn = SIG_DFL;
>>>>>>
>>>>>>  /* The timer works like this:
>>>>>>   * The thread, ticktack(), is a trivial routine that most of the time
>>>>>> @@ -1688,6 +1689,10 @@ sig_handler_t mingw_signal(int sig,
>>>>>> sig_handler_t handler)
>>>>>>               sigint_fn = handler;
>>>>>>               break;
>>>>>>
>>>>>> +     case SIGTERM:
>>>>>> +             sigterm_fn = handler;
>>>>>> +             break;
>>>>>> +
>>>>>>       default:
>>>>>>               return signal(sig, handler);
>>>>>>       }
>>>>>> @@ -1715,6 +1720,13 @@ int mingw_raise(int sig)
>>>>>>                       sigint_fn(SIGINT);
>>>>>>               return 0;
>>>>>>
>>>>>> +     case SIGTERM:
>>>>>> +             if (sigterm_fn == SIG_DFL)
>>>>>> +                     exit(128 + SIGTERM);
>>>>>> +             else if (sigterm_fn != SIG_IGN)
>>>>>> +                     sigterm_fn(SIGTERM);
>>>>>> +             return 0;
>>>>>> +
>>>>>>       default:
>>>>>>               return raise(sig);
>>>>>>       }
>>>>>
>>>>> That's pointless and does not work. The handler would only be called when
>>>>> raise() is called, but not when a SIGTERM is received, e.g., via Ctrl-C
>>>>> from the command line, because that route ends up in MSVCRT, which does
>>>>> not know about this handler.
>>>>
>>>> That's not entirely true. On Windows, there's only *one* way to
>>>> generate SIGTERM; "signal(SIGTERM)". Ctrl+C does not generate SIGTERM.
>>>> We generate SIGINT on Ctrl+C in mingw_fgetc, but the default Control+C
>>>> handler routine calls ExitProcess():
>>>> http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms683242(v=vs.85).aspx
>>>
>>> But a call to signal(SIGTERM, my_handler) should divert Ctrl+C to
>>> my_handler. The unpatched version does, because MSVCRT now knows about
>>> my_handler and sets things up so that the event handler calls my_handler.
>>
>> No, it does not:
>> Ctrl+C raises SIGINT, not SIGTERM.
>
> <action type="slap" destination="forehead"/>
>
> You are right. Your change would "fix" SIGTERM as it can be raised only
> via raise() on Windows nor can it be caught when a process is killed via
> mingw_kill(...,SIGTERM) by another process.
>
> But then the current handling of SIGINT in compat/mingw.c is broken. The
> handler is not propagated to MSVCRT, and after a SIGINT handler is
> installed, Ctrl+C still terminates the process. No?

Yeah, probably. I wasn't aware that it handled SIGINT, but yeah it
does. So this was indeed a regression.

> BTW, isn't mingw_signal() bogus in that it returns the SIGALRM handler
> even if a SIGINT handler is installed?

Yep, that's a bug. Thanks for noticing.

I've pushed out a branch here that tries to address these issues, but
I haven't had time to test them. I'll post the series when I have. In
the mean time:

https://github.com/kusma/git/tree/win32-signal-raise

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 20:19           ` David Lang
@ 2013-06-07 14:24             ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 15:20               ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-07 19:21             ` Felipe Contreras
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-07 14:24 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: David Lang
  Cc: Felipe Contreras, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

David Lang wrote:
> Well, Felipe is saying that Perl is dieing and we should re-write everything
> that exists in Perl to Ruby.

I don't agree with that opinion.  More generally, I think the entire
discussion on what _should_ or _should not_ be done is rubbish.  What
_will_ and _will not_ happen depends on the patches contributors send.
 If a contributor sends a patch rewriting git-svn in ruby, then we
have a discussion: is anyone bored enough to pick up the task in the
first place?

> TIOBE index graph is "press coverage" as far as I'm concerned.

Well, that's your definition of "press coverage" then.  TIOBE index is
generated from scraping the web to figure out which languages are
"living", based on discussions between programmers (and yes, "press"
articles).  I do not have conclusive or "undeniable" proof that perl
is dying, but the trends are indicative of a decline.

I think Felipe is using the argument that perl is declining to answer
the question "why didn't you write git-related in perl instead?";
that's it.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07  3:25         ` Johannes Schindelin
@ 2013-06-07 15:20           ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 17:57             ` Matthieu Moy
  2013-06-07 19:14           ` Felipe Contreras
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-07 15:20 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Schindelin
  Cc: Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder,
	Thomas Rast, René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c Duy, Felipe Contreras,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Johannes Schindelin wrote:
> On Fri, 7 Jun 2013, Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:
>> Johannes Schindelin wrote:
>> > My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
>> > for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).
>>
>> Nevertheless, we had to do it, and we did it.
>
> That is not quite correct. *I* did it. Not *we*. And I will not do it
> again.

When I say "we", I mean the git community.  You were incidentally part
of the git community when we got perl included in git-for-windows.
Don't make laughable assumptions about your indispensability: the
community will run fine without you (as it will run fine without me,
fc, or even jc).  There are enough and more smart diverse people to
replace the inactive people.

>> We will do it again, if we get enough important code written in Ruby.
>
> I am a bit bored by this hypothetical talk. This hypothetical "we will do
> it again", to be precise. Given my experience, it would be very painful if
> "enough important code" was written in Ruby. Nobody would help me "do it
> again". Just like nobody helps right now to upgrade to a newer Perl. Feel
> free to prove me wrong. Until that time, I will firmly believe that there
> is no "we will do it again".
>
> So here is a chance to prevent that: not repeat the mistake, and stay away
> from language hell by avoiding to require yet another language.

What is this "mistake" that you're talking about?  We never should
have merged git-svn.perl in our tree, and lost out on an incredibly
useful piece of software?

Let me make one thing clear: contributors are priority #1, and
everything else is secondary.  git.git is the sum of contributor
wishes, and we exist to keep contributors productive.  Yes, we have to
force some boring work onto contributors: nobody likes to write
documentation, and we have guidelines to make sure that it gets done,
for instance.

If enough people are interested in porting git-related to Windows,
they will figure out how to ship ruby with git-for-windows.  It is not
rocket science.

> As you know, there are very good reasons why I do not follow those mails.

No, I don't know the reason.  I would guess that you are disinterested.

> Exactly. Nobody really cares about keeping Git portable enough. Hence my
> impression that this idea to start requiring yet another language for core
> parts of Git is a bit misguided, and only logical from the point of view:
> "If you don't like it, why don't you install Linux?" (which, just in case
> you wondered, is a pretty naive way of looking at the real world).

I am personally disinterested in git-for-windows, but I wouldn't make
such a sweeping statement: there are some people interested in
git-for-windows.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 14:24             ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 15:20               ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-07 15:28                 ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 19:04                 ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-07 15:20 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: David Lang, Felipe Contreras, Greg Troxel, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

Ramkumar Ramachandra <artagnon@gmail.com> writes:

> I think Felipe is using the argument that perl is declining to answer
> the question "why didn't you write git-related in perl instead?";
> that's it.

A question which nobody asked, I presume?

I think we heard enough from packaging folks that a new dependency
is unwelcome.  Also we heard from no regular/high-value reviewers
that they feel comfortable reviewing additions in Ruby.

So at least for now, the conclusion is to take approach #1, i.e.
somebody who finds "related" a good addition rewrites it in Perl to
promote it out of contrib/ once the design issues settle (of course
it is still a possibility that no such volunteer appears).

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 15:20               ` Junio C Hamano
@ 2013-06-07 15:28                 ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 19:04                 ` Felipe Contreras
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-07 15:28 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano
  Cc: David Lang, Felipe Contreras, Greg Troxel, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

Junio C Hamano wrote:
> So at least for now, the conclusion is to take approach #1, i.e.
> somebody who finds "related" a good addition rewrites it in Perl to
> promote it out of contrib/ once the design issues settle (of course
> it is still a possibility that no such volunteer appears).

We'll think about it if and when we get major ruby patches, and see
perl patches declining.  One git-related.rb doesn't say anything.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 12:52     ` Matthieu Moy
@ 2013-06-07 16:11       ` Junio C Hamano
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-07 16:11 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Matthieu Moy
  Cc: Michael Haggerty, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt,
	Johannes Schindelin

Matthieu Moy <Matthieu.Moy@grenoble-inp.fr> writes:

> * Ask the user to build external programs with
>
>   make GIT_ROOT=where/git/lives/
>
> * or, ask users to checkout the external program as a subdirectory of
>   git.git to build it (for example, clang's build installation ask you
>   to put clang as a subdirectory of LLVM's tree).
>
>> But my main point is that I think it would be easier to phase out
>> contrib/ if there were a good alternate way of providing visibility to
>> "satellite" projects. [...] Perhaps ranking
>> the tools based on the results of the Git user surveys would help bring
>> the most popular to the top of each category.
>
> I think this is the most important point. A good example would be
> git-multimail: for now, the shell version in contrib/ is somehow
> considered as the official hook to send emails, just because it is in
> contrib, while git-multimail is clearly superior (unless you don't have
> a python interpreter on your server).

I was envisioning to sift what are in contrib/ into these four
categories:

 (1) Ones that deserve to be Git subcommands;

 (2) Ones that are useful only in the context of using Git
     (e.g. hooks, completion scripts, credential and remote helpers);

 (3) Ones that are no longer useful;

 (4) Ones that primarily _use_ Git, not the other way around
     (i.e. opposite of category (2) which help use of Git).

The first category will live next to git-am.sh (i.e. in the longer
term when we restructure the source tree into src/, lib/, etc.,
candidates for new scripted subcommands move with the scripted
Porcelains).

The second category will be in a separate hierarchy (perhaps
addons/, hooks/, ..., but I am fine if we decide to keep them in
contrib/addons, contrib/hooks, etc.).

The last two categories will be removed; people are welcome to
decide which category between (3) and (4) each piece belongs to, and
pick up to start a standalone third-party project.

The multimail tool can be in the second category.  It helps use of
Git more than it is helped by using Git.

> I'm not opposed to Junio's proposal to restrict contrib/ (although a bit
> reluctant), but I think this should be done with care, at least to give
> potential users a way to chose which tool to use (really, nobody want to
> go use https://git.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/InterfacesFrontendsAndTools
> to pick the right tool. It's a great list, but not a guide).

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 15:20           ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 17:57             ` Matthieu Moy
  2013-06-07 18:14               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
                                 ` (2 more replies)
  0 siblings, 3 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Matthieu Moy @ 2013-06-07 17:57 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c Duy,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Ramkumar Ramachandra <artagnon@gmail.com> writes:

> Johannes Schindelin wrote:
>> On Fri, 7 Jun 2013, Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:
>>> Johannes Schindelin wrote:
>>> > My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
>>> > for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).
>>>
>>> Nevertheless, we had to do it, and we did it.
>>
>> That is not quite correct. *I* did it. Not *we*. And I will not do it
>> again.
>
> When I say "we", I mean the git community.

I think it should be "the Git for Windows community", and my feeling is
that the community developing Git for POSIX systems is far more active
than the one making it work for Windows (although we may now have more
windows users than unix users).

Reading Git for Windows's FAQ
( https://github.com/msysgit/msysgit/wiki/Frequently-Asked-Questions ),
it seems rather clear that the TODO-list is already long to have a
correct Perl support (I'm quite admirative of the work done already).
The POSIX guys shouldn't move faster than the Windows guys can follow.

-- 
Matthieu Moy
http://www-verimag.imag.fr/~moy/

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 17:57             ` Matthieu Moy
@ 2013-06-07 18:14               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 18:24               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 18:28               ` Junio C Hamano
  2 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-07 18:14 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Matthieu Moy
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Matthieu Moy wrote:
> Reading Git for Windows's FAQ
> ( https://github.com/msysgit/msysgit/wiki/Frequently-Asked-Questions ),
> it seems rather clear that the TODO-list is already long to have a
> correct Perl support (I'm quite admirative of the work done already).
> The POSIX guys shouldn't move faster than the Windows guys can follow.

Ha!  So, it's subversion and perlxs.  I was wondering what was so
non-trivial about shipping a perl interpreter with Windows when dscho
mentioned it.

Hopefully, I've done a little bit to improve the situation by pushing
svnrdump into core (I don't know if it has any users).  On the git
side, git-remote-testsvn is still a toy (which is a product of many
months of work by db + 2x SoCs) compared to git-svn.perl.  Yeah,
supporting subversion is extraordinarily painful.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 17:57             ` Matthieu Moy
  2013-06-07 18:14               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 18:24               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 18:32                 ` Matthieu Moy
  2013-06-07 18:33                 ` Jonathan Nieder
  2013-06-07 18:28               ` Junio C Hamano
  2 siblings, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-07 18:24 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Matthieu Moy
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Matthieu Moy wrote:
> I think it should be "the Git for Windows community", and my feeling is
> that the community developing Git for POSIX systems is far more active
> than the one making it work for Windows (although we may now have more
> windows users than unix users).

If I can be excused for being frank, and saying something potentially
blasphemous:

I think he way forward on Windows is an implementation like libgit2 or
git# with some sort of gui/ide integration.  I never understood why
users on Windows want to use something as POSIX'y as git.git.
Wouldn't they prefer some visual-studio integration thing? *scratches
head*

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 17:57             ` Matthieu Moy
  2013-06-07 18:14               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 18:24               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 18:28               ` Junio C Hamano
  2 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-07 18:28 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Matthieu Moy
  Cc: Ramkumar Ramachandra, Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, git,
	Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c Duy,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Matthieu Moy <Matthieu.Moy@grenoble-inp.fr> writes:

> The POSIX guys shouldn't move faster than the Windows guys can follow.

That is a very good summary.

It does not mean everybody must always crawl at the same pace as the
slowest people.  But it is one of the important things we should
consider, when we have choices to make (e.g. "do we write this in
Python", "do we write it using this Perl module we haven't depended
on", etc.), to pick the one that does not make others work harder
than necessary---it affects the trade-offs.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 18:24               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 18:32                 ` Matthieu Moy
  2013-06-07 18:48                   ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 18:33                 ` Jonathan Nieder
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Matthieu Moy @ 2013-06-07 18:32 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Ramkumar Ramachandra <artagnon@gmail.com> writes:

> I think he way forward on Windows is an implementation like libgit2 or
> git# with some sort of gui/ide integration.  I never understood why
> users on Windows want to use something as POSIX'y as git.git.

Whether it's based on POSIX is an implementation detail for the user.
The real question is more command-line Vs GUI than POSIX/Win32. Some
Linux users like GUI, some windows users use command-line. I tried IDE
integration with EGIT, and quite frankly I ended-up doing all the Git
stuff in a terminal next to Eclipse.

> Wouldn't they prefer some visual-studio integration thing? *scratches
> head*

Visual Studio now has official Git support from MS (based on libgit2 if
I understood correctly). That's cool, but not a reason to kill msysgit
IMHO ;-).

-- 
Matthieu Moy
http://www-verimag.imag.fr/~moy/

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 18:24               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 18:32                 ` Matthieu Moy
@ 2013-06-07 18:33                 ` Jonathan Nieder
  2013-06-07 18:45                   ` Matthew Ruffalo
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Jonathan Nieder @ 2013-06-07 18:33 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: Matthieu Moy, Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	git, Jeff King, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c, Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:

> I think he way forward on Windows is

Why is there only one way forward?  Why do you get to pick it, given
that you've said you're not interested in working on it?

[...]
>                                              I never understood why
> users on Windows want to use something as POSIX'y as git.git.

Plenty of users on Windows use a command line.  I have even been such
a user from time to time.  I'm quite grateful for Dscho et al's work
on making that less painful.

Jonathan

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 18:33                 ` Jonathan Nieder
@ 2013-06-07 18:45                   ` Matthew Ruffalo
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Matthew Ruffalo @ 2013-06-07 18:45 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: git
  Cc: Jonathan Nieder, Ramkumar Ramachandra, Matthieu Moy,
	Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, Jeff King,
	Thomas Rast, René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c, Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Jonathan Nieder wrote:
> Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:
>
>> I think he way forward on Windows is
> Why is there only one way forward?  Why do you get to pick it, given
> that you've said you're not interested in working on it?
>
> [...]
>>                                               I never understood why
>> users on Windows want to use something as POSIX'y as git.git.
> Plenty of users on Windows use a command line.  I have even been such
> a user from time to time.  I'm quite grateful for Dscho et al's work
> on making that less painful.
>
> Jonathan
I agree completely. It's rare that I use Windows now, but a few years 
ago I installed Cygwin on any machine that I would use in any serious 
capacity. I haven't needed to do this since I started to use Git; the 
Windows installer ships all of the POSIX utilities that I need (with the 
possible exception of 'tree', and the caveat that scp can't handle files 
 >= 2GB).

I'm very appreciative of the work that's gone in to Git for Windows, and 
from my perspective it's a pleasant coincidence that it includes a POSIX 
shell and associated tools.

MMR...

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 18:32                 ` Matthieu Moy
@ 2013-06-07 18:48                   ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 19:00                     ` Matthieu Moy
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-07 18:48 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Matthieu Moy
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Matthieu Moy wrote:
> Visual Studio now has official Git support from MS (based on libgit2 if
> I understood correctly). That's cool, but not a reason to kill msysgit
> IMHO ;-).

Oh, I'm not interested in killing anything.  If people want msysgit,
they will work on it: I'm nobody to say otherwise.  I was just curious
to know why msysgit is suffering from a lack of attention: fewer
users?

> Whether it's based on POSIX is an implementation detail for the user.
> The real question is more command-line Vs GUI than POSIX/Win32. Some
> Linux users like GUI, some windows users use command-line. I tried IDE
> integration with EGIT, and quite frankly I ended-up doing all the Git
> stuff in a terminal next to Eclipse.

I see.  But isn't it possible to implement a CLI in libgit2 too, no?

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 18:48                   ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 19:00                     ` Matthieu Moy
  2013-06-07 19:10                       ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Matthieu Moy @ 2013-06-07 19:00 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Ramkumar Ramachandra <artagnon@gmail.com> writes:

>> Whether it's based on POSIX is an implementation detail for the user.
>> The real question is more command-line Vs GUI than POSIX/Win32. Some
>> Linux users like GUI, some windows users use command-line. I tried IDE
>> integration with EGIT, and quite frankly I ended-up doing all the Git
>> stuff in a terminal next to Eclipse.
>
> I see.  But isn't it possible to implement a CLI in libgit2 too, no?

Yes (there have actually been several attempts at this like
https://github.com/Romain-Geissler/git2 and
https://github.com/vfr-nl/git2/), but there are a *lot* of stuff that
are in git.git and not in libgit2.

I'd love to see Git re-implemented on top of libgit2, but that's not
going to happen tomorrow :-\.

-- 
Matthieu Moy
http://www-verimag.imag.fr/~moy/

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 15:20               ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-07 15:28                 ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 19:04                 ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-07 19:27                   ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 19:55                   ` Junio C Hamano
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-07 19:04 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano
  Cc: Ramkumar Ramachandra, David Lang, Greg Troxel, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 10:20 AM, Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> wrote:
> Ramkumar Ramachandra <artagnon@gmail.com> writes:
>
>> I think Felipe is using the argument that perl is declining to answer
>> the question "why didn't you write git-related in perl instead?";
>> that's it.
>
> A question which nobody asked, I presume?
>
> I think we heard enough from packaging folks that a new dependency
> is unwelcome.

What are you talking about? Which are these "packaging folks" we heard from?

> Also we heard from no regular/high-value reviewers
> that they feel comfortable reviewing additions in Ruby.

Correction; *current* regular/high-value reviewers.

> So at least for now, the conclusion is to take approach #1, i.e.
> somebody who finds "related" a good addition rewrites it in Perl to
> promote it out of contrib/ once the design issues settle (of course
> it is still a possibility that no such volunteer appears).

Regardless of what you conclude, Perl still continues to die, and by
clinging to a dying language, all we do is hurt the project.

There's tons of people that are familiar with Git and Ruby, but these
people are not in this mailing list because there's nothing for them
to discuss, because Git doesn't use Ruby. By making conclusions based
on the comments from people who do follow the mailing list
*currently*, you are being biased towards the status quo.

It's no surprise that you decided to keep the status quo.

We could change, and we would probably receive a big influx of fresh
contributors happy that they can contribute in their favorite
language. But we won't do that, why? Because you already decided
that's not going to happen, because you are making the false
assumption that things in the future can only be like things have been
in the past.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 19:00                     ` Matthieu Moy
@ 2013-06-07 19:10                       ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-07 19:10 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Matthieu Moy
  Cc: Ramkumar Ramachandra, Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel,
	Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt

On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 2:00 PM, Matthieu Moy
<Matthieu.Moy@grenoble-inp.fr> wrote:
> Ramkumar Ramachandra <artagnon@gmail.com> writes:
>
>>> Whether it's based on POSIX is an implementation detail for the user.
>>> The real question is more command-line Vs GUI than POSIX/Win32. Some
>>> Linux users like GUI, some windows users use command-line. I tried IDE
>>> integration with EGIT, and quite frankly I ended-up doing all the Git
>>> stuff in a terminal next to Eclipse.
>>
>> I see.  But isn't it possible to implement a CLI in libgit2 too, no?
>
> Yes (there have actually been several attempts at this like
> https://github.com/Romain-Geissler/git2 and
> https://github.com/vfr-nl/git2/), but there are a *lot* of stuff that
> are in git.git and not in libgit2.
>
> I'd love to see Git re-implemented on top of libgit2, but that's not
> going to happen tomorrow :-\.

Specially not if we *always* keep the status quo, and don't make
better use of C and scripting languages. One of the advantages of Ruby
is that it can be very easily extended from C. I have never seen an
easier way to write bindings than in Ruby. If we allowed Ruby to be in
the core, it would make sense to create official Ruby bindings, and
that would create an enormous motivation for libigit/libgit2 to be
complete.

But if we always keep the status quo, there will never be that much
motivation for such an effort.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07  3:25         ` Johannes Schindelin
  2013-06-07 15:20           ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 19:14           ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-07 19:41             ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-07 19:14 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Schindelin
  Cc: Ramkumar Ramachandra, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git,
	Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c Duy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 10:25 PM, Johannes Schindelin
<Johannes.Schindelin@gmx.de> wrote:
> On Fri, 7 Jun 2013, Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:
>
>> Johannes Schindelin wrote:
>> > My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
>> > for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).
>>
>> Nevertheless, we had to do it, and we did it.
>
> That is not quite correct. *I* did it. Not *we*. And I will not do it
> again.

That's fine, I can do it. I bet it will be easy.

While at it, why not re-evaluate the whole msysgit approach? I bet we
don't need a whole separate project just to create a Windows
installer. I've written Windows installers before, it's very easy to
do from Linux.

>> Rewriting everything in C?  Is anyone bored enough to pick up this task?
>> Bourne shell is a great language for prototyping; git-rebase.sh (and
>> friends), git-stash.sh, git-pull.sh are doing just fine.  Sure, it makes
>> sense to do heavy-lifting in C, and this is happening as it has always
>> been happening (remember git-commit.sh?).  If you followed the list
>> emails, you'd know that Felipe is looking into delegating large portions
>> of the work done by git-rebase.sh to sequencer.c.
>
> As you know, there are very good reasons why I do not follow those mails.

To the detriment on the project.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 20:19           ` David Lang
  2013-06-07 14:24             ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 19:21             ` Felipe Contreras
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-07 19:21 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: David Lang
  Cc: Ramkumar Ramachandra, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git,
	Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 3:19 PM, David Lang <david@lang.hm> wrote:
> On Fri, 7 Jun 2013, Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:
>
>> David Lang wrote:
>>>
>>> Perl use may or may not be declining (depending on how you measure it),
>>> but
>>> are you really willing to take on the task of re-writing everything
>>> that's
>>> in Perl into another language and force all developers of scripts to
>>> learn
>>> that other language? what's the ROI of this?
>>
>>
>> Let's not talk hypotheticals.  git-svn.perl (+ perl/SVN/*.pl) is
>> absolutely massive.  It's an incredibly useful tool in that it
>> actually works, and that there is nothing replacing it in the
>> foreseeable future.  This monster was written almost entirely by one
>> brilliant person, and nobody is going to rewrite it.  We don't start a
>> huge discussion about what languages are "approved" before accepting
>> such a contribution: if the contributor wants to write something in a
>> dominant language (Perl in this case), and it's going to be useful, we
>> merge it.  End of story.
>
>
> Well, Felipe is saying that Perl is dieing and we should re-write everything
> that exists in Perl to Ruby.

No, I said we should try to move away from Perl. Move stuff to C,
shell scripts, and yeah, Ruby.

>> Why are we discussing something that is indeterminate?  It is
>> impossible to foresee the future, but that is no reason to freeze
>> _present_ development.
>
> and it's not a reason to throw away existing stuff based on the argument
> that Perl is dieing

Who said anything about throwing away code?

>> Nobody claimed that "press coverage" is a good metric.  We can only
>> talk about facts, and Felipe already showed you a TIOBE index graph.
>> If you have overwhelming _evidence_ that Ruby is a weak language that
>> will die soon, share it: otherwise, I see no value in this discussion.
>
>
> TIOBE index graph is "press coverage" as far as I'm concerned.
>
> I'm not saying that Ruby in particular has a fatal flaw, I'm just
> questioning the "Perl is dead, re-write everything in Ruby" mantra.
>
> The language that you choose to use when writing a new application is
> related to things related to that type of application.
>
> Ruby is not an extremely common language for sysadmins to use.

Who said we need a language commonly used by sysadmins for our Git core?

> Perl remains a common language for these sorts of tasks, even if it's not
> used for user visible applications.

Ruby is pretty much a replacement for Perl. For every task Perl is
good, Ruby also is. Ruby's syntax even borrows from Perl.

The difference is; Ruby is better for many more tasks that suck in Perl.

> Arguing that Perl is dieing, we need to abandon it is just wrong.

Straw man. Nobody is arguing that.

I said we should try to avoid it, not abandon it immediately.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 19:04                 ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-07 19:27                   ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 19:38                     ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-09  2:57                     ` Johannes Schindelin
  2013-06-07 19:55                   ` Junio C Hamano
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-07 19:27 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, David Lang, Greg Troxel, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

Felipe Contreras wrote:
>> Also we heard from no regular/high-value reviewers
>> that they feel comfortable reviewing additions in Ruby.
>
> Correction; *current* regular/high-value reviewers.

Correct.  The opinions of inactive community members and
non-contributors are less useful.

> We could change, and we would probably receive a big influx of fresh
> contributors happy that they can contribute in their favorite
> language. But we won't do that, why? Because you already decided
> that's not going to happen, because you are making the false
> assumption that things in the future can only be like things have been
> in the past.

Okay, so here's the deal: commit a lot of good ruby code to contrib*,
and attract users/ contributors.  Eventually, if you're right about
git.git growing a healthy ruby ecosystem, we'll get ruby in core.  As
I've said multiple times, this agenda-based approach just sucks,
because we can't predict the future.

* I'll help out in whatever little way I can

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: Dependencies and packaging (Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/)
  2013-06-06 21:31           ` Dependencies and packaging (Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/) Jonathan Nieder
@ 2013-06-07 19:29             ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-07 19:29 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jonathan Nieder
  Cc: Ramkumar Ramachandra, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git,
	Jeff King, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty,
	Matthieu Moy, Nguyễn Thái Ngọc, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 4:31 PM, Jonathan Nieder <jrnieder@gmail.com> wrote:
> Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:
>
>>                                      Git is probably the _last_ thing
>> to be complaining about when it comes to packaging.
>
> It would be nice if contrib/ files supported the usual "make; make
> install; make clean" targets.  That's missing functionality that does
> matter to at least one packager.
>
> It would be nice if the dependencies associated to each piece of
> functionality or makefile flag were documented more clearly.
> Currently when e.g. features of gitweb gain dependencies I don't
> notice until the testsuite fails.

Here's a good example how to do that:
https://github.com/felipec/git/blob/fc/master/contrib/remote-helpers/Makefile

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 19:27                   ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 19:38                     ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-09  2:57                     ` Johannes Schindelin
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-07 19:38 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, David Lang, Greg Troxel, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:
> commit a lot of good ruby code to contrib*

Oh, by the way: I have a project idea.  There's this really popular
project called hub[1] that has an implementation of the GitHub API in
ruby.  Unfortunately, it's a terrible piece of software because it
creates an extra layer of indirection by putting a ruby wrapper on top
of git, and this slows git down: I cannot tolerate even a microsecond
of delay in git.  Maybe it's worth ripping out the GitHub API
implementation and writing some useful subcommands?

[1]: https://github.com/defunkt/hub

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 19:14           ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-07 19:41             ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-09  2:59               ` Johannes Schindelin
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-07 19:41 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c Duy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Felipe Contreras wrote:
> While at it, why not re-evaluate the whole msysgit approach? I bet we
> don't need a whole separate project just to create a Windows
> installer. I've written Windows installers before, it's very easy to
> do from Linux.

Yeah, taking the pain out of msysgit packaging would be a great way to
counter this new-dependency-fud.  The main problem, as mm pointed out
is subversion + perlxs [1].  Any idea how to tackle that?

[1]: https://github.com/msysgit/msysgit/wiki/Frequently-Asked-Questions

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 19:04                 ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-07 19:27                   ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-07 19:55                   ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-07 20:24                     ` Felipe Contreras
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-07 19:55 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Ramkumar Ramachandra, David Lang, Greg Troxel, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

Felipe Contreras <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> writes:

>> I think we heard enough from packaging folks that a new dependency
>> is unwelcome.
>
> What are you talking about? Which are these "packaging folks" we heard from?

Dscho is one of the primary people behind msysgit effort, and I
consulted with others from the circle with an draft before I sent
the message to the list for sanity checking (fearing that I may be
worrying about adding new dependencies needlessly).  Jonathan
packages git for Debian and he is negative on adding new dependency
needlessly. It was unexpected that we hear from a pkgsrc person but
the response was also negative.

>> Also we heard from no regular/high-value reviewers
>> that they feel comfortable reviewing additions in Ruby.
>
> Correction; *current* regular/high-value reviewers.

That is exactly what I meant.

The code review is not only about following best practices in the
implementation language.  If somebody who is an expert in a language
we do not currently depend on, but who does not know how the parts
of Git are supposed to fit together enough to judge the soundness of
the design of new code written in that new language, or does not
know how the tests, documentation and log messages are supposed to
written around here, that person cannot be the only reviewer for
changes written in that language to ensure quality standard.

The reviewer pool for code written in a new language _must_ be
seeded by some from the current set of reviewers whose judgement
I/we can trust.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 19:55                   ` Junio C Hamano
@ 2013-06-07 20:24                     ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-08  2:23                       ` Duy Nguyen
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-07 20:24 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano
  Cc: Ramkumar Ramachandra, David Lang, Greg Troxel, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 2:55 PM, Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> wrote:
> Felipe Contreras <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> writes:
>
>>> I think we heard enough from packaging folks that a new dependency
>>> is unwelcome.
>>
>> What are you talking about? Which are these "packaging folks" we heard from?
>
> Dscho is one of the primary people behind msysgit effort, and I
> consulted with others from the circle with an draft before I sent
> the message to the list for sanity checking (fearing that I may be
> worrying about adding new dependencies needlessly).

He said he won't do it, but I said I would. Doesn't that solve the problem?

> Jonathan
> packages git for Debian and he is negative on adding new dependency
> needlessly.

I don't see any comment from Jonathan.

> It was unexpected that we hear from a pkgsrc person but
> the response was also negative.

You mean Greg Troxel? He is only one of the persons that help, and I
did shut down his argument, didn't I?

>>> Also we heard from no regular/high-value reviewers
>>> that they feel comfortable reviewing additions in Ruby.
>>
>> Correction; *current* regular/high-value reviewers.
>
> That is exactly what I meant.
>
> The code review is not only about following best practices in the
> implementation language.  If somebody who is an expert in a language
> we do not currently depend on, but who does not know how the parts
> of Git are supposed to fit together enough to judge the soundness of
> the design of new code written in that new language, or does not
> know how the tests, documentation and log messages are supposed to
> written around here, that person cannot be the only reviewer for
> changes written in that language to ensure quality standard.
>
> The reviewer pool for code written in a new language _must_ be
> seeded by some from the current set of reviewers whose judgement
> I/we can trust.

By that standard nothing will ever change. Ever.

Even twenty years from now, you will still only trust people that are
familiar with shell, Perl, and C. Because the only way to gain your
trust, is by being proficient in shell, Perl, and C.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-06 16:22     ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Johannes Schindelin
  2013-06-06 20:40       ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-08  2:17       ` Duy Nguyen
  2013-06-08 10:02         ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-09  3:07         ` Johannes Schindelin
  1 sibling, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Duy Nguyen @ 2013-06-08  2:17 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Schindelin
  Cc: Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, Git Mailing List, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 11:22 PM, Johannes Schindelin
<Johannes.Schindelin@gmx.de> wrote:
> Hi Greg,
>
> On Thu, 6 Jun 2013, Greg Troxel wrote:
>
>> As one of the people who helps maintain git packages in pkgsrc, my
>> initial reaction is negative to adding a ruby dependency.
>
> My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
> for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).
>
> As you can see from the commit history, I was the primary force behind
> trying to get everything "core" in Git away from requiring scripting
> languages (I think it is an awesome thing to provide APIs for as many
> languages as possible, but a not-so-cool thing to use more than one
> language in the core code). It does not seem that anybody picked up that
> task when I left, though.

Nobody seems to mention it yet. There's another reason behind the C
rewrite effort: fork is costly on Windows. The C rewrite allows us to
run with one process (most of the time). This applies for shell, perl
and even ruby scripts because libgit.a is never meant to be used
outside git.c context (unlike libgit2). In this regard, ruby is just
as bad as currently supported non-C languages.
--
Duy

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 20:24                     ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-08  2:23                       ` Duy Nguyen
  2013-06-08 10:08                         ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Duy Nguyen @ 2013-06-08  2:23 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, Ramkumar Ramachandra, David Lang, Greg Troxel,
	Git Mailing List, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 3:24 AM, Felipe Contreras
<felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
>> The reviewer pool for code written in a new language _must_ be
>> seeded by some from the current set of reviewers whose judgement
>> I/we can trust.
>
> By that standard nothing will ever change. Ever.
>
> Even twenty years from now, you will still only trust people that are
> familiar with shell, Perl, and C. Because the only way to gain your
> trust, is by being proficient in shell, Perl, and C.

I don't see why a trusted person cannot learn a new language and
convince the community to give it a try (well given that enough
reviewers support the new language, which was Junio's point).
--
Duy

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08  2:17       ` Duy Nguyen
@ 2013-06-08 10:02         ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-08 11:28           ` Duy Nguyen
  2013-06-09  3:07         ` Johannes Schindelin
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-08 10:02 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Duy Nguyen
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

[-- Attachment #1: Type: text/plain, Size: 2105 bytes --]

On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 9:17 PM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 11:22 PM, Johannes Schindelin
> <Johannes.Schindelin@gmx.de> wrote:
>> Hi Greg,
>>
>> On Thu, 6 Jun 2013, Greg Troxel wrote:
>>
>>> As one of the people who helps maintain git packages in pkgsrc, my
>>> initial reaction is negative to adding a ruby dependency.
>>
>> My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
>> for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).
>>
>> As you can see from the commit history, I was the primary force behind
>> trying to get everything "core" in Git away from requiring scripting
>> languages (I think it is an awesome thing to provide APIs for as many
>> languages as possible, but a not-so-cool thing to use more than one
>> language in the core code). It does not seem that anybody picked up that
>> task when I left, though.
>
> Nobody seems to mention it yet. There's another reason behind the C
> rewrite effort: fork is costly on Windows. The C rewrite allows us to
> run with one process (most of the time). This applies for shell, perl
> and even ruby scripts because libgit.a is never meant to be used
> outside git.c context (unlike libgit2). In this regard, ruby is just
> as bad as currently supported non-C languages.

Are you sure?

---
#!/bin/sh

cat > /tmp/test <<EOF
require './git'

(1..100).each do |e|
  puts \`git rev-parse HEAD~#{e}\`
end
EOF

strace -o /tmp/log -e fork,clone ruby /tmp/test
cat /tmp/log
---

---
clone(child_stack=0x7f84131dbff0,
flags=CLONE_VM|CLONE_FS|CLONE_FILES|CLONE_SIGHAND|CLONE_THREAD|CLONE_SYSVSEM|CLONE_SETTLS|CLONE_PARENT_SETTID|CLONE_CHILD_CLEARTID,
parent_tidptr=0x7f84131dc9d0, tls=0x7f84131dc700,
child_tidptr=0x7f84131dc9d0) = 17455
+++ exited with 0 +++
---

I wrote a simple Ruby extension to access Git builtins so `git
rev-parse` actually calls cmd_rev_parse directly. I don't know of any
other language that supports so much extensibility. Of course, as soon
as one command does exit(), the script ends too. It could be useful to
do experiments though.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

[-- Attachment #2: git.c --]
[-- Type: text/x-csrc, Size: 1982 bytes --]

#include <builtin.h>
#include <cache.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

#undef NORETURN
#undef PATH_SEP

#include <ruby.h>

static VALUE shellwords;

struct cmd_struct {
	const char *cmd;
	int (*fn)(int, const char **, const char *);
	int option;
};

#define RUN_SETUP (1 << 0)
#define RUN_SETUP_GENTLY (1 << 1)
#define USE_PAGER (1 << 2)
#define NEED_WORK_TREE (1 << 3)

static struct cmd_struct commands[] = {
	{ "rev-parse", cmd_rev_parse },
	{ "show", cmd_show, RUN_SETUP },
};

static VALUE git_rb_backticks(int o_argc, VALUE *o_argv, VALUE ctx)
{
	int argc, i, old;
	int pipefd[2];
	const char **argv;
	char buf[0x1000];
	VALUE command;
	int do_read;
	struct cmd_struct *cmd = NULL;
	const char *prefix = NULL;

	if (strncmp(RSTRING_PTR(o_argv[0]), "git ", 4)) {
		VALUE port, result;
		port = rb_funcall(rb_cIO, rb_intern("popen"), 1, o_argv[0]);
		result = rb_funcall(port, rb_intern("read"), 0);
		rb_funcall(result, rb_intern("chomp!"), 0);
		rb_io_close(port);
		return result;
	}

	command = rb_funcall(shellwords, rb_intern("shellsplit"), 1, o_argv[0]);
	rb_ary_shift(command);

	argc = RARRAY_LEN(command);
	argv = xcalloc(sizeof(*argv), argc);

	VALUE *rarray = RARRAY_PTR(command);
	for (i = 0; i < argc; i++)
		argv[i] = RSTRING_PTR(rarray[i]);

	old = dup(1);
	i = pipe(pipefd);
	dup2(pipefd[1], 1);
	close(pipefd[1]);

	for (i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE(commands); i++) {
		struct cmd_struct *p = &commands[i];
		if (strcmp(p->cmd, argv[0]))
			continue;
		cmd = p;
	}

	if (!cmd)
		rb_raise(rb_eArgError, "unknown command: %s", argv[0]);

	if (cmd->option & RUN_SETUP)
		prefix = setup_git_directory();

	i = cmd->fn(argc, argv, prefix);
	rb_last_status_set(i, getpid());

	fflush(stdout);
	dup2(old, 1);

	i = read(pipefd[0], buf, sizeof(buf));
	if (buf[i - 1] == '\n')
		i -= 1;
	buf[i] = '\0';

	return rb_str_new(buf, i);
}

void Init_git(void)
{
	rb_require("shellwords");
	shellwords = rb_define_module("Shellwords");
	rb_define_global_function("`", git_rb_backticks, -1);
}

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08  2:23                       ` Duy Nguyen
@ 2013-06-08 10:08                         ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-08 11:20                           ` Duy Nguyen
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-08 10:08 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Duy Nguyen
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, Ramkumar Ramachandra, David Lang, Greg Troxel,
	Git Mailing List, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 9:23 PM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 3:24 AM, Felipe Contreras
> <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> The reviewer pool for code written in a new language _must_ be
>>> seeded by some from the current set of reviewers whose judgement
>>> I/we can trust.
>>
>> By that standard nothing will ever change. Ever.
>>
>> Even twenty years from now, you will still only trust people that are
>> familiar with shell, Perl, and C. Because the only way to gain your
>> trust, is by being proficient in shell, Perl, and C.
>
> I don't see why a trusted person cannot learn a new language and
> convince the community to give it a try (well given that enough
> reviewers support the new language, which was Junio's point).

I do. Raise your hand if you are interested in giving a try to Ruby
for Git's core given that somebody gives convincing reasons?

How many hands do you expect?

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08 10:08                         ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-08 11:20                           ` Duy Nguyen
  2013-06-08 12:06                             ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Duy Nguyen @ 2013-06-08 11:20 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, Ramkumar Ramachandra, David Lang, Greg Troxel,
	Git Mailing List, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 5:08 PM, Felipe Contreras
<felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 9:23 PM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 3:24 AM, Felipe Contreras
>> <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> The reviewer pool for code written in a new language _must_ be
>>>> seeded by some from the current set of reviewers whose judgement
>>>> I/we can trust.
>>>
>>> By that standard nothing will ever change. Ever.
>>>
>>> Even twenty years from now, you will still only trust people that are
>>> familiar with shell, Perl, and C. Because the only way to gain your
>>> trust, is by being proficient in shell, Perl, and C.
>>
>> I don't see why a trusted person cannot learn a new language and
>> convince the community to give it a try (well given that enough
>> reviewers support the new language, which was Junio's point).
>
> I do. Raise your hand if you are interested in giving a try to Ruby
> for Git's core given that somebody gives convincing reasons?

Personally, no additional runtime dependency > Ruby > Python. I don't
think Ruby is available on SunOS and I prefer not to build and install
Python nor Ruby myself to be able to use Git. So no hands from me.

> How many hands do you expect?

If not many hands show up, the Git community clearly is not ready to
adopt Ruby. Maybe ask again next year when Ruby is getting more
popular?
--
Duy

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08 10:02         ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-08 11:28           ` Duy Nguyen
  2013-06-08 11:56             ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Duy Nguyen @ 2013-06-08 11:28 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 5:02 PM, Felipe Contreras
<felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 9:17 PM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 11:22 PM, Johannes Schindelin
>> <Johannes.Schindelin@gmx.de> wrote:
>>> Hi Greg,
>>>
>>> On Thu, 6 Jun 2013, Greg Troxel wrote:
>>>
>>>> As one of the people who helps maintain git packages in pkgsrc, my
>>>> initial reaction is negative to adding a ruby dependency.
>>>
>>> My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
>>> for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).
>>>
>>> As you can see from the commit history, I was the primary force behind
>>> trying to get everything "core" in Git away from requiring scripting
>>> languages (I think it is an awesome thing to provide APIs for as many
>>> languages as possible, but a not-so-cool thing to use more than one
>>> language in the core code). It does not seem that anybody picked up that
>>> task when I left, though.
>>
>> Nobody seems to mention it yet. There's another reason behind the C
>> rewrite effort: fork is costly on Windows. The C rewrite allows us to
>> run with one process (most of the time). This applies for shell, perl
>> and even ruby scripts because libgit.a is never meant to be used
>> outside git.c context (unlike libgit2). In this regard, ruby is just
>> as bad as currently supported non-C languages.
>
> Are you sure?

I'm not saying you can't. I'm saying it's not meant to be used that
way. Which means there may be problems lurking around. You can write a
ruby extension to access libgit.a, sure, but how many people on this
list understand git design and limits _and_ ruby's good enough to spot
the bugs? If a bug is found and requires major restructuring in
libgit.a, how are you sure it's worth the effort and does not
destablize the rest of git? A better way to do it is linking against
libgit2.

>
> ---
> #!/bin/sh
>
> cat > /tmp/test <<EOF
> require './git'
>
> (1..100).each do |e|
>   puts \`git rev-parse HEAD~#{e}\`
> end
> EOF
>
> strace -o /tmp/log -e fork,clone ruby /tmp/test
> cat /tmp/log
> ---
>
> ---
> clone(child_stack=0x7f84131dbff0,
> flags=CLONE_VM|CLONE_FS|CLONE_FILES|CLONE_SIGHAND|CLONE_THREAD|CLONE_SYSVSEM|CLONE_SETTLS|CLONE_PARENT_SETTID|CLONE_CHILD_CLEARTID,
> parent_tidptr=0x7f84131dc9d0, tls=0x7f84131dc700,
> child_tidptr=0x7f84131dc9d0) = 17455
> +++ exited with 0 +++
> ---
>
> I wrote a simple Ruby extension to access Git builtins so `git
> rev-parse` actually calls cmd_rev_parse directly. I don't know of any
> other language that supports so much extensibility. Of course, as soon
> as one command does exit(), the script ends too. It could be useful to
> do experiments though.
--
Duy

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08 11:28           ` Duy Nguyen
@ 2013-06-08 11:56             ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-08 12:07               ` Duy Nguyen
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-08 11:56 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Duy Nguyen
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 6:28 AM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 5:02 PM, Felipe Contreras
> <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 9:17 PM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 11:22 PM, Johannes Schindelin
>>> <Johannes.Schindelin@gmx.de> wrote:
>>>> Hi Greg,
>>>>
>>>> On Thu, 6 Jun 2013, Greg Troxel wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> As one of the people who helps maintain git packages in pkgsrc, my
>>>>> initial reaction is negative to adding a ruby dependency.
>>>>
>>>> My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
>>>> for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).
>>>>
>>>> As you can see from the commit history, I was the primary force behind
>>>> trying to get everything "core" in Git away from requiring scripting
>>>> languages (I think it is an awesome thing to provide APIs for as many
>>>> languages as possible, but a not-so-cool thing to use more than one
>>>> language in the core code). It does not seem that anybody picked up that
>>>> task when I left, though.
>>>
>>> Nobody seems to mention it yet. There's another reason behind the C
>>> rewrite effort: fork is costly on Windows. The C rewrite allows us to
>>> run with one process (most of the time). This applies for shell, perl
>>> and even ruby scripts because libgit.a is never meant to be used
>>> outside git.c context (unlike libgit2). In this regard, ruby is just
>>> as bad as currently supported non-C languages.
>>
>> Are you sure?
>
> I'm not saying you can't. I'm saying it's not meant to be used that
> way. Which means there may be problems lurking around.

Code is code. If something is not meant to be used in certain way, you fix it.

> You can write a ruby extension to access libgit.a, sure,

I'm not using libgit.a, I'm using the builtin commands. This is
exactly the same code you run when you type 'git foo'.

> but how many people on this
> list understand git design and limits _and_ ruby's good enough to spot
> the bugs?

Now you are changing the subject. Does that mean that you accept that
'fork' wouldn't be a problem when writing Ruby scripts?

As for the people that know Git and Ruby; they can learn. Didn't you
just said that you didn't see any problem with the community learning
a new language?

> If a bug is found and requires major restructuring in
> libgit.a, how are you sure it's worth the effort and does not
> destablize the rest of git?

There is no need to destabilize anything. I just showed you 100 lines
of code that are able to run git commands without forks, and without
changing anything in libgit.a.

> A better way to do it is linking against libgit2.

I would rather use what the rest of Git uses. It doesn't make any
sense fragment even more the code, and make Ruby scripts 2nd class
citizens along the way. Plus, any script that tries to use libgit2,
would certainly need more than 100 lines.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08 11:20                           ` Duy Nguyen
@ 2013-06-08 12:06                             ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-08 12:06 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Duy Nguyen
  Cc: Junio C Hamano, Ramkumar Ramachandra, David Lang, Greg Troxel,
	Git Mailing List, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt, Johannes Schindelin

On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 6:20 AM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 5:08 PM, Felipe Contreras
> <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 9:23 PM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 3:24 AM, Felipe Contreras
>>> <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>> The reviewer pool for code written in a new language _must_ be
>>>>> seeded by some from the current set of reviewers whose judgement
>>>>> I/we can trust.
>>>>
>>>> By that standard nothing will ever change. Ever.
>>>>
>>>> Even twenty years from now, you will still only trust people that are
>>>> familiar with shell, Perl, and C. Because the only way to gain your
>>>> trust, is by being proficient in shell, Perl, and C.
>>>
>>> I don't see why a trusted person cannot learn a new language and
>>> convince the community to give it a try (well given that enough
>>> reviewers support the new language, which was Junio's point).
>>
>> I do. Raise your hand if you are interested in giving a try to Ruby
>> for Git's core given that somebody gives convincing reasons?
>
> Personally, no additional runtime dependency > Ruby > Python.

You forgot to list the current ones; shell, perl, python.

> I don't
> think Ruby is available on SunOS and I prefer not to build and install
> Python nor Ruby myself to be able to use Git. So no hands from me.

It doesn't surprise me that you stopped at an assumption, instead of
making sure.

>> How many hands do you expect?
>
> If not many hands show up, the Git community clearly is not ready to
> adopt Ruby.

And they will never be. Nor Ruby nor anything else, which was
precisely my point.

> Maybe ask again next year when Ruby is getting more popular?

You will stop again with another assumption, without ever giving it a chance.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08 11:56             ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-08 12:07               ` Duy Nguyen
  2013-06-08 13:20                 ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Duy Nguyen @ 2013-06-08 12:07 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 6:56 PM, Felipe Contreras
<felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 6:28 AM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 5:02 PM, Felipe Contreras
>> <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 9:17 PM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 11:22 PM, Johannes Schindelin
>>>> <Johannes.Schindelin@gmx.de> wrote:
>>>>> Hi Greg,
>>>>>
>>>>> On Thu, 6 Jun 2013, Greg Troxel wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> As one of the people who helps maintain git packages in pkgsrc, my
>>>>>> initial reaction is negative to adding a ruby dependency.
>>>>>
>>>>> My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
>>>>> for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).
>>>>>
>>>>> As you can see from the commit history, I was the primary force behind
>>>>> trying to get everything "core" in Git away from requiring scripting
>>>>> languages (I think it is an awesome thing to provide APIs for as many
>>>>> languages as possible, but a not-so-cool thing to use more than one
>>>>> language in the core code). It does not seem that anybody picked up that
>>>>> task when I left, though.
>>>>
>>>> Nobody seems to mention it yet. There's another reason behind the C
>>>> rewrite effort: fork is costly on Windows. The C rewrite allows us to
>>>> run with one process (most of the time). This applies for shell, perl
>>>> and even ruby scripts because libgit.a is never meant to be used
>>>> outside git.c context (unlike libgit2). In this regard, ruby is just
>>>> as bad as currently supported non-C languages.
>>>
>>> Are you sure?
>>
>> I'm not saying you can't. I'm saying it's not meant to be used that
>> way. Which means there may be problems lurking around.
>
> Code is code. If something is not meant to be used in certain way, you fix it.

Code is code. Bugs can be hard and easy. Hard bugs take a lot of time
and may not be worth it after all.

>> You can write a ruby extension to access libgit.a, sure,
>
> I'm not using libgit.a, I'm using the builtin commands. This is
> exactly the same code you run when you type 'git foo'.
>
>> but how many people on this
>> list understand git design and limits _and_ ruby's good enough to spot
>> the bugs?
>
> Now you are changing the subject. Does that mean that you accept that
> 'fork' wouldn't be a problem when writing Ruby scripts?

There are a lot of static variables in builtin/ (and outside too),
which make it non-entrant, or at least not safe. fork provides a
process space isolation, some depend on that. And there are die()
everywhere. Good luck controlling them.

> As for the people that know Git and Ruby; they can learn. Didn't you
> just said that you didn't see any problem with the community learning
> a new language?

I said nothing about the community being ready _now_, did I? When you
have the support for Ruby in Git, sure go ahead.

>> If a bug is found and requires major restructuring in
>> libgit.a, how are you sure it's worth the effort and does not
>> destablize the rest of git?
>
> There is no need to destabilize anything. I just showed you 100 lines
> of code that are able to run git commands without forks, and without
> changing anything in libgit.a.

And how do you deal with, for example die(), or thread safety?
-- 
Duy

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08 12:07               ` Duy Nguyen
@ 2013-06-08 13:20                 ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-08 17:15                   ` Jeff King
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-08 13:20 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Duy Nguyen
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 7:07 AM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 6:56 PM, Felipe Contreras
> <felipe.contreras@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 6:28 AM, Duy Nguyen <pclouds@gmail.com> wrote:

>>> but how many people on this
>>> list understand git design and limits _and_ ruby's good enough to spot
>>> the bugs?
>>
>> Now you are changing the subject. Does that mean that you accept that
>> 'fork' wouldn't be a problem when writing Ruby scripts?
>
> There are a lot of static variables in builtin/ (and outside too),
> which make it non-entrant, or at least not safe.

So?

> fork provides a process space isolation, some depend on that.

Process space isolation from what?

> And there are die() everywhere. Good luck controlling them.

Done.

--- a/ruby/git.c
+++ b/ruby/git.c
@@ -1,6 +1,7 @@
 #include <builtin.h>
 #include <cache.h>
 #include <fcntl.h>
+#include <ucontext.h>

 #undef NORETURN
 #undef PATH_SEP
@@ -8,6 +9,8 @@
 #include <ruby.h>

 static VALUE shellwords;
+static ucontext_t main_context;
+static int status;

 struct cmd_struct {
 	const char *cmd;
@@ -73,7 +76,14 @@ static VALUE git_rb_backticks(int o_argc, VALUE
*o_argv, VALUE ctx)
 	if (cmd->option & RUN_SETUP)
 		prefix = setup_git_directory();

-	i = cmd->fn(argc, argv, prefix);
+	getcontext(&main_context);
+	if (status == 0) {
+		status += 1;
+		i = cmd->fn(argc, argv, prefix);
+	} else {
+		i = 1;
+	}
+	status = 0;
 	rb_last_status_set(i, getpid());

 	fflush(stdout);
@@ -87,9 +97,19 @@ static VALUE git_rb_backticks(int o_argc, VALUE
*o_argv, VALUE ctx)
 	return rb_str_new(buf, i);
 }

+static void bye(void)
+{
+	if (status != 1)
+		return;
+	status += 1;
+	setcontext(&main_context);
+}
+
 void Init_git(void)
 {
 	rb_require("shellwords");
 	shellwords = rb_define_module("Shellwords");
 	rb_define_global_function("`", git_rb_backticks, -1);
+
+	atexit(bye);
 }

>> As for the people that know Git and Ruby; they can learn. Didn't you
>> just said that you didn't see any problem with the community learning
>> a new language?
>
> I said nothing about the community being ready _now_, did I?

If they can learn Ruby five years from now, then can learn it now.

> When you have the support for Ruby in Git, sure go ahead.

You are going in circles.

>>> If a bug is found and requires major restructuring in
>>> libgit.a, how are you sure it's worth the effort and does not
>>> destablize the rest of git?
>>
>> There is no need to destabilize anything. I just showed you 100 lines
>> of code that are able to run git commands without forks, and without
>> changing anything in libgit.a.
>
> And how do you deal with, for example die(), or thread safety?

See above for die(), and I don't see many perl or shell scripts with
multiple threads, why should the Ruby scripts have more than one
thread?

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08 13:20                 ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-08 17:15                   ` Jeff King
  2013-06-08 17:40                     ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Jeff King @ 2013-06-08 17:15 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Duy Nguyen, Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Sat, Jun 08, 2013 at 08:20:28AM -0500, Felipe Contreras wrote:

> > There are a lot of static variables in builtin/ (and outside too),
> > which make it non-entrant, or at least not safe.
> 
> So?
> 
> > fork provides a process space isolation, some depend on that.
> 
> Process space isolation from what?

Manipulation of global variables. Here are a few examples off the top of
my head:

Try running "git diff" from your Ruby hook, then try running "git
diff-files" within the same process. I believe the latter will start
respecting porcelain diff config like diff.mnemonicprefix. To clear
state you need to reset a list of global variables back to their initial
states (some of which are the BSS-default zero, but some of which are
not).

Try running "git log" followed by another "git log". The log family of
commands does not clear its marks from the commit objects, since it
expects to exit after the traversal. The second log will sometimes give
wrong answers if its traversal overlaps with the first (e.g., commits
marked SEEN or UNINTERESTING that should not be). You can add a call to
clear them at the end of the process, but that does not cover any cases
where we die().

These are problems that can be solved. But there is a lot of work
involved in finding these subtle bugs and coming up with fixes. I think
you would be better off working on an implementation of git that was
designed from scratch to work in-process, like libgit2. And it even has
an actively developed and maintained Ruby binding[1].

libgit2 doesn't have feature parity with regular git yet, but there are
many clients based around it that use the library internally for speed,
and then exec regular git to fill in the gaps.

-Peff

[1] https://github.com/libgit2/rugged

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08 17:15                   ` Jeff King
@ 2013-06-08 17:40                     ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-09  0:10                       ` Jeff King
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-08 17:40 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jeff King
  Cc: Duy Nguyen, Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 12:15 PM, Jeff King <peff@peff.net> wrote:
> On Sat, Jun 08, 2013 at 08:20:28AM -0500, Felipe Contreras wrote:
>
>> > There are a lot of static variables in builtin/ (and outside too),
>> > which make it non-entrant, or at least not safe.
>>
>> So?
>>
>> > fork provides a process space isolation, some depend on that.
>>
>> Process space isolation from what?
>
> Manipulation of global variables. Here are a few examples off the top of
> my head:
>
> Try running "git diff" from your Ruby hook, then try running "git
> diff-files" within the same process. I believe the latter will start
> respecting porcelain diff config like diff.mnemonicprefix. To clear
> state you need to reset a list of global variables back to their initial
> states (some of which are the BSS-default zero, but some of which are
> not).
>
> Try running "git log" followed by another "git log". The log family of
> commands does not clear its marks from the commit objects, since it
> expects to exit after the traversal. The second log will sometimes give
> wrong answers if its traversal overlaps with the first (e.g., commits
> marked SEEN or UNINTERESTING that should not be). You can add a call to
> clear them at the end of the process, but that does not cover any cases
> where we die().
>
> These are problems that can be solved. But there is a lot of work
> involved in finding these subtle bugs and coming up with fixes. I think
> you would be better off working on an implementation of git that was
> designed from scratch to work in-process, like libgit2.

So you are in favor of never ever having an official Git library. Got it.

> libgit2 doesn't have feature parity with regular git yet, but there are
> many clients based around it that use the library internally for speed,
> and then exec regular git to fill in the gaps.

There's a reason why the Git project doesn't use libgit2, and for the
same reason the official Ruby scripts should not use it.

As history indicates, the Git project will never have any pressure to
fix it's re-entrancy and re-run issues, so these issues will remain
there forever.

Only if you allow code that exposes those issues will there ever be
any pressure to fix them.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08 17:40                     ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-09  0:10                       ` Jeff King
  2013-06-09  1:17                         ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Jeff King @ 2013-06-09  0:10 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Duy Nguyen, Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Sat, Jun 08, 2013 at 12:40:19PM -0500, Felipe Contreras wrote:

> > These are problems that can be solved. But there is a lot of work
> > involved in finding these subtle bugs and coming up with fixes. I think
> > you would be better off working on an implementation of git that was
> > designed from scratch to work in-process, like libgit2.
> 
> So you are in favor of never ever having an official Git library. Got it.

No, I didn't say that at all.

I do think that it would be more work to try to slowly massage the git
code into a library-ready form than it would be to simply start with
more library-friendly code and pull in bits of git.git as appropriate.

That is what the libgit2 project is doing.  Perhaps one day that project
will reach a point where we start building git.git commands off of it or
sometihng like it (for that matter, there is no reason you could not
build external commands off of libgit2 right now).  Would it be the
"official" Git library then? I don't know. It is not clear to me what
that even means.

In the meantime, I think it cannot be a bad thing for libgit2 to proceed
along its path, and I don't see a good reason for people not to use it.

But hey, you don't need to listen to me. If you think it would be easier
to make the git.git code into a library, go ahead and work on it. But I
think you will find that there are a large number of hard-to-find bugs
caused by implicit assumptions about global state, how file descriptors
are used, and so forth.

> There's a reason why the Git project doesn't use libgit2, and for the
> same reason the official Ruby scripts should not use it.

What reason is that?

> As history indicates, the Git project will never have any pressure to
> fix it's re-entrancy and re-run issues, so these issues will remain
> there forever.
> 
> Only if you allow code that exposes those issues will there ever be
> any pressure to fix them.

I think it is a matter of critical mass. If you were to start linking
against libgit.a and 90% of it worked, you might have a reason to fix
the other 10%. But I suspect it is more the other way around.

-Peff

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-07 10:12                 ` Erik Faye-Lund
  2013-06-07 10:24                   ` Johannes Sixt
@ 2013-06-09  0:18                   ` Jeff King
  2013-06-09 20:31                     ` Junio C Hamano
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Jeff King @ 2013-06-09  0:18 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Erik Faye-Lund; +Cc: Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, Johannes Sixt, git

On Fri, Jun 07, 2013 at 12:12:52PM +0200, Erik Faye-Lund wrote:

> > Yeah, if it were mingw_raise responsible for this, I would suggest using
> > the POSIX shell "128+sig" instead. We could potentially check for
> > SIG_DFL[1] mingw_raise and intercept and exit there. I don't know if
> > that would create headaches or confusion for other msys programs,
> > though. I'd leave that up to the msysgit people to decide whether it is
> > worth the trouble.
> >
> 
> ...and here's the code to do just that:
> [...]
> @@ -1715,6 +1720,13 @@ int mingw_raise(int sig)
>  			sigint_fn(SIGINT);
>  		return 0;
> 
> +	case SIGTERM:
> +		if (sigterm_fn == SIG_DFL)
> +			exit(128 + SIGTERM);
> +		else if (sigterm_fn != SIG_IGN)
> +			sigterm_fn(SIGTERM);
> +		return 0;

I'm a little negative on handling just SIGTERM. That would make the test
pass, but does it really address the overall issue? To me, the
usefulness is having exit values with consistent meanings. Imagine I run
a very large git hosting site, and I want to log exceptional conditions
(e.g., a git sub-process crashes). What exit code do I get from a
SIGSEGV or SIGBUS (or GPF, or whatever Windows calls these)?

On Unix systems, this is pretty easy. To be honest, I do not care that
much about Windows systems because I would not host a large site on it.
:) But IMHO, the point of such a scheme is to be consistent across all
signals.

-Peff

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-09  0:10                       ` Jeff King
@ 2013-06-09  1:17                         ` Felipe Contreras
  2013-06-09  2:23                           ` Jeff King
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-09  1:17 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jeff King
  Cc: Duy Nguyen, Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 7:10 PM, Jeff King <peff@peff.net> wrote:
> On Sat, Jun 08, 2013 at 12:40:19PM -0500, Felipe Contreras wrote:
>
>> > These are problems that can be solved. But there is a lot of work
>> > involved in finding these subtle bugs and coming up with fixes. I think
>> > you would be better off working on an implementation of git that was
>> > designed from scratch to work in-process, like libgit2.
>>
>> So you are in favor of never ever having an official Git library. Got it.
>
> No, I didn't say that at all.

Then you truly think libgit2 will ever reach the point where it can
replace libgit.a?

It won't. But decreeing that both projects should remain isolated, and
that libgit.a should never be a library, you are effectively
condemning the effort to fail, knowingly or not.

How many years has libgit2 been brewing? Do you think it's closer for
merging so it can be used by Git's core? No, it doesn't, and it will
not in the future, because it was never meant for that.

> I do think that it would be more work to try to slowly massage the git
> code into a library-ready form than it would be to simply start with
> more library-friendly code and pull in bits of git.git as appropriate.

It might be more effort, but the results are guaranteed by our
extensive testing infrastructure and huge user-base. Slowly but
steadily we'll get there.

Waiting for libgit2 to switch directions and reach some hypothetical
point is waiting for hell to freeze.

It won't happen. There's no incentive nor reason for it to happen.

> That is what the libgit2 project is doing.  Perhaps one day that project
> will reach a point where we start building git.git commands off of it or
> sometihng like it (for that matter, there is no reason you could not
> build external commands off of libgit2 right now).  Would it be the
> "official" Git library then? I don't know. It is not clear to me what
> that even means.

It means 'make install' installs a shared library with a clearly
defined and stable API that other projects can depend on, and it can
be used for all sort of purposes, including the git binary, and it's
builtins.

> In the meantime, I think it cannot be a bad thing for libgit2 to proceed
> along its path, and I don't see a good reason for people not to use it.

Its path will never end as an official Git library, not unless we do something.

> But hey, you don't need to listen to me. If you think it would be easier
> to make the git.git code into a library, go ahead and work on it. But I
> think you will find that there are a large number of hard-to-find bugs
> caused by implicit assumptions about global state, how file descriptors
> are used, and so forth.

That's impossible. Specially since moving irrelevant code out of
libgit.a is not permitted.

>> There's a reason why the Git project doesn't use libgit2, and for the
>> same reason the official Ruby scripts should not use it.
>
> What reason is that?

You tell me. Why isn't Git using libgit2?

>> As history indicates, the Git project will never have any pressure to
>> fix it's re-entrancy and re-run issues, so these issues will remain
>> there forever.
>>
>> Only if you allow code that exposes those issues will there ever be
>> any pressure to fix them.
>
> I think it is a matter of critical mass. If you were to start linking
> against libgit.a and 90% of it worked, you might have a reason to fix
> the other 10%. But I suspect it is more the other way around.

It doesn't matter if it's 90% or 10%, it's the only thing we have.

Unless you are in favor of including libgit2 and start using it for
Git's core *right now*, the only way forward is to improve libgit.a.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-09  1:17                         ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-09  2:23                           ` Jeff King
  2013-06-09  2:41                             ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Jeff King @ 2013-06-09  2:23 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Felipe Contreras
  Cc: Duy Nguyen, Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Sat, Jun 08, 2013 at 08:17:08PM -0500, Felipe Contreras wrote:

> > No, I didn't say that at all.
> 
> Then you truly think libgit2 will ever reach the point where it can
> replace libgit.a?

I don't know. It may. Or something like it may. It is certainly not
ready to do so yet, but perhaps one day it will be.

> It won't.

Oh, I see, you were not actually interested in my answer and were just
being rhetorical.

> But decreeing that both projects should remain isolated, and
> that libgit.a should never be a library, you are effectively
> condemning the effort to fail, knowingly or not.

Huh? When did I decree anything? You asked Duy what kinds of problems
you would run into with running multiple git commands in the same
process space. I answered with concrete examples, and gave my opinions
on what the path of least work would be to reach a re-entrant library.
You don't have to agree (didn't I even say "you don't have to listen to
me" in the last email?).

> How many years has libgit2 been brewing? Do you think it's closer for
> merging so it can be used by Git's core? No, it doesn't, and it will
> not in the future, because it was never meant for that.

There has been about 2 years of active development, and there's been
quite a lot of improvement in that time. Closer than what? Than it was 2
years ago? Yes, I think it is. But it still has a ways to go.

I do not think there will be a flag day where we throw away git.git's
code and start using libgit2. But we could slowly start replacing
underlying bits with libgit2 bits, if that implementation proves to be
robust and clean enough to do so.

> > But hey, you don't need to listen to me. If you think it would be easier
> > to make the git.git code into a library, go ahead and work on it. But I
> > think you will find that there are a large number of hard-to-find bugs
> > caused by implicit assumptions about global state, how file descriptors
> > are used, and so forth.
> 
> That's impossible. Specially since moving irrelevant code out of
> libgit.a is not permitted.

I'm not even sure what your second sentence means.

But it seems to me that the first step would be cleaning up the internal
code so that it is more friendly to library callers (both in interface
and in being re-entrant), with those first sets of callers being the
existing code in git.git. Such cleanups would be a good thing for the
modularity of the code, even without an intended library step.

And then you can start to pull out individual interfaces that are known
to be safe for library use, and think about making a coherent library
out of them.

And please don't tell me about "not permitted". You are free to fork and
work on this. But do not expect people who have already said "that does
not seem like a fruitful path to me" to jump into it with you. If you
think it is worth doing and that you can come up with initial results to
convince others, go for it.

> >> There's a reason why the Git project doesn't use libgit2, and for the
> >> same reason the official Ruby scripts should not use it.
> >
> > What reason is that?
> 
> You tell me. Why isn't Git using libgit2?

Wait, you indicated you had such a reason in mind, but now you won't
tell me? Is it a secret?

> > I think it is a matter of critical mass. If you were to start linking
> > against libgit.a and 90% of it worked, you might have a reason to fix
> > the other 10%. But I suspect it is more the other way around.
> 
> It doesn't matter if it's 90% or 10%, it's the only thing we have.
> 
> Unless you are in favor of including libgit2 and start using it for
> Git's core *right now*, the only way forward is to improve libgit.a.

That seems like a false choice to me. You obviously feel that libgit2 is
some kind of dead end. I don't agree. Whatever.

I have very little interest in discussing this further with you, as it
is not leading in a productive direction. In my opinion, the productive
things to do would be one (or both) of:

  1. Work on libgit2.

  2. Clean up non-reentrant bits of git.git, hopefully making the code
     more readable and more modular (and taking care not to make it
     worse in other ways, like maintainability or performance).

-Peff

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-09  2:23                           ` Jeff King
@ 2013-06-09  2:41                             ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-09  2:41 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jeff King
  Cc: Duy Nguyen, Johannes Schindelin, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano,
	Git Mailing List, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

On Sat, Jun 8, 2013 at 9:23 PM, Jeff King <peff@peff.net> wrote:
> On Sat, Jun 08, 2013 at 08:17:08PM -0500, Felipe Contreras wrote:
>
>> > No, I didn't say that at all.
>>
>> Then you truly think libgit2 will ever reach the point where it can
>> replace libgit.a?
>
> I don't know. It may. Or something like it may. It is certainly not
> ready to do so yet, but perhaps one day it will be.

Perhaps one day we would end poverty and hunger, and perhaps one day
we will live in peace, but I wouldn't hold on my breath. I fact, I'll
do the opposite, I bet it won't happen anytime soon.

>> It won't.
>
> Oh, I see, you were not actually interested in my answer and were just
> being rhetorical.
>
>> But decreeing that both projects should remain isolated, and
>> that libgit.a should never be a library, you are effectively
>> condemning the effort to fail, knowingly or not.
>
> Huh? When did I decree anything?

When you said in your opinion we should wait until libgit2 is ready,
and not improve libgit.a.

>> How many years has libgit2 been brewing? Do you think it's closer for
>> merging so it can be used by Git's core? No, it doesn't, and it will
>> not in the future, because it was never meant for that.
>
> There has been about 2 years of active development, and there's been
> quite a lot of improvement in that time. Closer than what? Than it was 2
> years ago? Yes, I think it is. But it still has a ways to go.

Why is it closer? In what ways is it a better fit now than 2 years
ago? What is missing before merging to be used in Git's core?

> I do not think there will be a flag day where we throw away git.git's
> code and start using libgit2. But we could slowly start replacing
> underlying bits with libgit2 bits, if that implementation proves to be
> robust and clean enough to do so.

And what are we waiting for then? Shouldn't we copy the whole libgit2
code and start migrating?

>> > But hey, you don't need to listen to me. If you think it would be easier
>> > to make the git.git code into a library, go ahead and work on it. But I
>> > think you will find that there are a large number of hard-to-find bugs
>> > caused by implicit assumptions about global state, how file descriptors
>> > are used, and so forth.
>>
>> That's impossible. Specially since moving irrelevant code out of
>> libgit.a is not permitted.
>
> I'm not even sure what your second sentence means.

It means this:
http://article.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/226752

I move code that doesn't belong in a libgit library out of libgit.a,
and the change gets rejected.

> But it seems to me that the first step would be cleaning up the internal
> code so that it is more friendly to library callers (both in interface
> and in being re-entrant),

That is the second step. It doesn't make sense to make code
re-entrant, if that code will only be used by builtin commands. First
step is to move irrelevant code out of libgit.a.

>> >> There's a reason why the Git project doesn't use libgit2, and for the
>> >> same reason the official Ruby scripts should not use it.
>> >
>> > What reason is that?
>>
>> You tell me. Why isn't Git using libgit2?
>
> Wait, you indicated you had such a reason in mind, but now you won't
> tell me? Is it a secret?

I did not. I made the assumption that there was a reason, if there's
no reason to stay clear of libgit2, then let's merge it already.

>> > I think it is a matter of critical mass. If you were to start linking
>> > against libgit.a and 90% of it worked, you might have a reason to fix
>> > the other 10%. But I suspect it is more the other way around.
>>
>> It doesn't matter if it's 90% or 10%, it's the only thing we have.
>>
>> Unless you are in favor of including libgit2 and start using it for
>> Git's core *right now*, the only way forward is to improve libgit.a.
>
> That seems like a false choice to me. You obviously feel that libgit2 is
> some kind of dead end. I don't agree. Whatever.

I never said so. It is a dead end *if* we don't do an effort to have a
proper libgit library, which is the path we are taking.

> I have very little interest in discussing this further with you, as it
> is not leading in a productive direction. In my opinion, the productive
> things to do would be one (or both) of:
>
>   1. Work on libgit2.
>
>   2. Clean up non-reentrant bits of git.git, hopefully making the code
>      more readable and more modular (and taking care not to make it
>      worse in other ways, like maintainability or performance).

You forgot the first step of 2.: move irrelevant code out of libgit.a.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 19:27                   ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-07 19:38                     ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-09  2:57                     ` Johannes Schindelin
  2013-06-09  9:16                       ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  1 sibling, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Schindelin @ 2013-06-09  2:57 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: Felipe Contreras, Junio C Hamano, David Lang, Greg Troxel, git,
	Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Hi Ram,

On Sat, 8 Jun 2013, Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:

> Felipe Contreras wrote:
> >> Also we heard from no regular/high-value reviewers that they feel
> >> comfortable reviewing additions in Ruby.
> >
> > Correction; *current* regular/high-value reviewers.
> 
> Correct.  The opinions of inactive community members and
> non-contributors are less useful.

I humbly suggest to treat other people's contribution with the same
respect you want yours' to be treated.

Just a suggestion,
J

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-07 19:41             ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-09  2:59               ` Johannes Schindelin
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Schindelin @ 2013-06-09  2:59 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: Felipe Contreras, Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, git, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c Duy, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Hi Ram,

On Sat, 8 Jun 2013, Ramkumar Ramachandra wrote:

> Felipe Contreras wrote:
> > While at it, why not re-evaluate the whole msysgit approach? I bet we
> > don't need a whole separate project just to create a Windows
> > installer. I've written Windows installers before, it's very easy to
> > do from Linux.
> 
> Yeah, taking the pain out of msysgit packaging would be a great way to
> counter this new-dependency-fud.  The main problem, as mm pointed out
> is subversion + perlxs.

Yeah, this is the main problem, and you probably will end up with a much
better (Linux-based) solution than the people who contributed to the Git
for Windows project in all those years since August 2007.

Surprise me, with code,
J

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-08  2:17       ` Duy Nguyen
  2013-06-08 10:02         ` Felipe Contreras
@ 2013-06-09  3:07         ` Johannes Schindelin
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Schindelin @ 2013-06-09  3:07 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Duy Nguyen
  Cc: Greg Troxel, Junio C Hamano, Git Mailing List, Jeff King,
	Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Felipe Contreras, Ramsay Jones,
	Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Hi Duy,

On Sat, 8 Jun 2013, Duy Nguyen wrote:

> On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 11:22 PM, Johannes Schindelin
> <Johannes.Schindelin@gmx.de> wrote:
> > Hi Greg,
> >
> > On Thu, 6 Jun 2013, Greg Troxel wrote:
> >
> >> As one of the people who helps maintain git packages in pkgsrc, my
> >> initial reaction is negative to adding a ruby dependency.
> >
> > My initial reaction, too. It was hard enough to get Perl included with Git
> > for Windows (because of that pesky Subversion dependency).
> >
> > As you can see from the commit history, I was the primary force behind
> > trying to get everything "core" in Git away from requiring scripting
> > languages (I think it is an awesome thing to provide APIs for as many
> > languages as possible, but a not-so-cool thing to use more than one
> > language in the core code). It does not seem that anybody picked up that
> > task when I left, though.
> 
> Nobody seems to mention it yet. There's another reason behind the C
> rewrite effort: fork is costly on Windows. The C rewrite allows us to
> run with one process (most of the time). This applies for shell, perl
> and even ruby scripts because libgit.a is never meant to be used
> outside git.c context (unlike libgit2). In this regard, ruby is just
> as bad as currently supported non-C languages.

I think you should have said "on Windows" when you said "fork is costly".
Oh wait, you did.

It seems that at least some people participating in this discussion are
not overly keen on supporting the platform that -- according to
statistics, i.e. facts -- is the most prevalent.

I am glad that Junio still seems to be interested in giving us poor folks
trying to make the Git experience on Windows a less sucky one enough
credit, even if we only got a little over 900 commits into git.git. But
that does not count because the commits are older than one year. That
makes them useless to some people, apparently.

Hopefully Junio will have more mercy on us poor Windows folks than others
would,
Dscho

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-09  2:57                     ` Johannes Schindelin
@ 2013-06-09  9:16                       ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
  2013-06-09 23:29                         ` Junio C Hamano
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Ramkumar Ramachandra @ 2013-06-09  9:16 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Schindelin
  Cc: Felipe Contreras, Junio C Hamano, David Lang, Greg Troxel, git,
	Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Johannes Schindelin wrote:
>> Correct.  The opinions of inactive community members and
>> non-contributors are less useful.
>
> I humbly suggest to treat other people's contribution with the same
> respect you want yours' to be treated.

What?!  When did I disrespect other people's contributions?  git.git
is what it is today because of everyone's contributions: if I
disrespected them, why would I work on improving git?

My opinion has nothing to do with me, or my contributions.  I have
already stated multiple times on the list that I take no pride in my
contributions whatsoever*: I have no ego to speak of.  I said "the
opinions of inactive community members and non-contributors are less
useful [than those of active contributors]", and I'm still scratching
my head over what you inferred.  Do you think that the opinions of
inactive community members and non-contributors are _more_ valuable
than those of active contributors, or am I missing something?

* You'd know that if you read emails on the list.  But you don't, for
some mysterious unstated reason.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-09  0:18                   ` [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows Jeff King
@ 2013-06-09 20:31                     ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-10  5:30                       ` Johannes Sixt
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-09 20:31 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Jeff King; +Cc: Erik Faye-Lund, Felipe Contreras, Johannes Sixt, git

Jeff King <peff@peff.net> writes:

> I'm a little negative on handling just SIGTERM. That would make the test
> pass, but does it really address the overall issue? To me, the
> usefulness is having exit values with consistent meanings.

Yes.  Unless the goal is to give Windows port pratically the same
signal semantics as ports on other platforms, I do not think special
casing SIGTERM (unless it is a very common signal on Windows and
others are unlikely to be useful) buys us much.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-09  9:16                       ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
@ 2013-06-09 23:29                         ` Junio C Hamano
  2013-06-10  4:56                           ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-09 23:29 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Ramkumar Ramachandra
  Cc: Johannes Schindelin, Felipe Contreras, David Lang, Greg Troxel,
	git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast, René Scharfe,
	Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy, Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c,
	Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund, Johannes Sixt

Ramkumar Ramachandra <artagnon@gmail.com> writes:

> Do you think that the opinions of
> inactive community members and non-contributors are _more_ valuable
> than those of active contributors, or am I missing something?

I am not Dscho, but it probably is worth saying this anyway.

6d297f81373e (Status update on merge-recursive in C, 2006-07-08)
stole merge-recursive.c from git-merge-recursive.py with an explicit
purpose of making sure that those without a working Python can
perform such a core operation like "merge" with Git without extra
forking.

The person who worked on it, as long as he knows that the project
not just accepted the patch and kept using the code but also that
the project understood the rationale behind that change, does not
necessarily have a reason to appear every week to interject comments
in discussions on any part of the system, even to proposed changes
to merge-recursive.c, as long as the original thing the change meant
to address is not broken (e.g. removing merge-recursive.c and add it
as a merge strategy written in Python or Ruby might trigger "huh",
but ditching merge-recursive.c and replacing it with merge-replay.c
as long as it works would be a "meh" for him).

When otherwise silent old-timers feel a need to come during a
discussion that might affect the course of the project in a major
way, we should pay more attention, not less, to what they say (I am
not saying "we should blindly follow").  They can explain why some
things are as they are, why some changes that may look like a good
idea did not work out and how they failed, etc.

Certainly the opinions from them are no less valuable.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/
  2013-06-09 23:29                         ` Junio C Hamano
@ 2013-06-10  4:56                           ` Felipe Contreras
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Felipe Contreras @ 2013-06-10  4:56 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano
  Cc: Ramkumar Ramachandra, Johannes Schindelin, David Lang,
	Greg Troxel, git, Jeff King, Jonathan Nieder, Thomas Rast,
	René Scharfe, Michael Haggerty, Matthieu Moy,
	Nguy­n Thái Ng÷c, Ramsay Jones, Erik Faye-Lund,
	Johannes Sixt

On Sun, Jun 9, 2013 at 6:29 PM, Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> wrote:

> When otherwise silent old-timers feel a need to come during a
> discussion that might affect the course of the project in a major
> way, we should pay more attention, not less, to what they say (I am
> not saying "we should blindly follow").

I say we should pay attention to the arguments, not the people, that's
ad hominem.

-- 
Felipe Contreras

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-09 20:31                     ` Junio C Hamano
@ 2013-06-10  5:30                       ` Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-10 11:38                         ` Erik Faye-Lund
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Sixt @ 2013-06-10  5:30 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Junio C Hamano; +Cc: Jeff King, Erik Faye-Lund, Felipe Contreras, git

Am 6/9/2013 22:31, schrieb Junio C Hamano:
> Jeff King <peff@peff.net> writes:
> 
>> I'm a little negative on handling just SIGTERM. That would make the test
>> pass, but does it really address the overall issue? To me, the
>> usefulness is having exit values with consistent meanings.
> 
> Yes.  Unless the goal is to give Windows port pratically the same
> signal semantics as ports on other platforms, I do not think special
> casing SIGTERM (unless it is a very common signal on Windows and
> others are unlikely to be useful) buys us much.

I'm thinking the same. And, no, SIGTERM is not very common on Windows.

-- Hannes

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* [PATCH] mingw: make mingw_signal return the correct handler
  2013-06-07 14:20                             ` Erik Faye-Lund
@ 2013-06-10  5:48                               ` Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-10 11:37                                 ` Erik Faye-Lund
  2013-06-10 20:50                                 ` Junio C Hamano
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Johannes Sixt @ 2013-06-10  5:48 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: kusmabite; +Cc: Jeff King, Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, git

From: Erik Faye-Lund <kusmabite@gmail.com>

Returning the SIGALRM handler for SIGINT is not very useful.

Signed-off-by: Erik Faye-Lund <kusmabite@gmail.com>
Signed-off-by: Johannes Sixt <j6t@kdbg.org>
---
Am 6/7/2013 16:20, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 3:07 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
>> BTW, isn't mingw_signal() bogus in that it returns the SIGALRM handler
>> even if a SIGINT handler is installed?
> 
> Yep, that's a bug. Thanks for noticing.

This is your patch to address it.

> I've pushed out a branch here that tries to address these issues, but
> I haven't had time to test them. I'll post the series when I have. In
> the mean time:
> 
> https://github.com/kusma/git/tree/win32-signal-raise

Concerning the other two patches:

* SIGINT: perhaps handle only the SIG_DFL case (for the exit code) and
forward all other cases to MSVCRT?

* SIGTERM: it papers only over a general issue and should be dropped.

IMO.

-- Hannes

 compat/mingw.c | 4 +++-
 1 file changed, 3 insertions(+), 1 deletion(-)

diff --git a/compat/mingw.c b/compat/mingw.c
index b295e2f..bb92c43 100644
--- a/compat/mingw.c
+++ b/compat/mingw.c
@@ -1677,14 +1677,16 @@ int sigaction(int sig, struct sigaction *in,
struct sigaction *out)
 #undef signal
 sig_handler_t mingw_signal(int sig, sig_handler_t handler)
 {
-	sig_handler_t old = timer_fn;
+	sig_handler_t old;

 	switch (sig) {
 	case SIGALRM:
+		old = timer_fn;
 		timer_fn = handler;
 		break;

 	case SIGINT:
+		old = sigint_fn;
 		sigint_fn = handler;
 		break;

-- 
1.8.3.1504.g78dbf7a

^ permalink raw reply related	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] mingw: make mingw_signal return the correct handler
  2013-06-10  5:48                               ` [PATCH] mingw: make mingw_signal return the correct handler Johannes Sixt
@ 2013-06-10 11:37                                 ` Erik Faye-Lund
  2013-06-10 20:50                                 ` Junio C Hamano
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Erik Faye-Lund @ 2013-06-10 11:37 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Sixt; +Cc: Jeff King, Junio C Hamano, Felipe Contreras, git

On Mon, Jun 10, 2013 at 7:48 AM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
> From: Erik Faye-Lund <kusmabite@gmail.com>
>
> Returning the SIGALRM handler for SIGINT is not very useful.
>
> Signed-off-by: Erik Faye-Lund <kusmabite@gmail.com>
> Signed-off-by: Johannes Sixt <j6t@kdbg.org>
> ---
> Am 6/7/2013 16:20, schrieb Erik Faye-Lund:
>> On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 3:07 PM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
>>> BTW, isn't mingw_signal() bogus in that it returns the SIGALRM handler
>>> even if a SIGINT handler is installed?
>>
>> Yep, that's a bug. Thanks for noticing.
>
> This is your patch to address it.
>
>> I've pushed out a branch here that tries to address these issues, but
>> I haven't had time to test them. I'll post the series when I have. In
>> the mean time:
>>
>> https://github.com/kusma/git/tree/win32-signal-raise
>
> Concerning the other two patches:
>
> * SIGINT: perhaps handle only the SIG_DFL case (for the exit code) and
> forward all other cases to MSVCRT?

Perhaps. I'll have to think a bit about it, but it might very well be
the sanest approach, as long as it doesn't break git_terminal_prompt
(which was the reason for the change in the first place). I can't of
the top of my head understand why it should, though.

> * SIGTERM: it papers only over a general issue and should be dropped.

Fair enough.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows
  2013-06-10  5:30                       ` Johannes Sixt
@ 2013-06-10 11:38                         ` Erik Faye-Lund
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Erik Faye-Lund @ 2013-06-10 11:38 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Sixt; +Cc: Junio C Hamano, Jeff King, Felipe Contreras, git

On Mon, Jun 10, 2013 at 7:30 AM, Johannes Sixt <j.sixt@viscovery.net> wrote:
> Am 6/9/2013 22:31, schrieb Junio C Hamano:
>> Jeff King <peff@peff.net> writes:
>>
>>> I'm a little negative on handling just SIGTERM. That would make the test
>>> pass, but does it really address the overall issue? To me, the
>>> usefulness is having exit values with consistent meanings.
>>
>> Yes.  Unless the goal is to give Windows port pratically the same
>> signal semantics as ports on other platforms, I do not think special
>> casing SIGTERM (unless it is a very common signal on Windows and
>> others are unlikely to be useful) buys us much.
>
> I'm thinking the same. And, no, SIGTERM is not very common on Windows.
>

I have no strong feelings on SIGTERM, but my knee-jerk reaction is the
same. AFAIK, the only issue we've seen with it has been this one,
which is synthetic.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH] mingw: make mingw_signal return the correct handler
  2013-06-10  5:48                               ` [PATCH] mingw: make mingw_signal return the correct handler Johannes Sixt
  2013-06-10 11:37                                 ` Erik Faye-Lund
@ 2013-06-10 20:50                                 ` Junio C Hamano
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 104+ messages in thread
From: Junio C Hamano @ 2013-06-10 20:50 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Johannes Sixt; +Cc: kusmabite, Jeff King, Felipe Contreras, git

Thanks.

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 104+ messages in thread

end of thread, other threads:[~2013-06-10 20:50 UTC | newest]

Thread overview: 104+ messages (download: mbox.gz / follow: Atom feed)
-- links below jump to the message on this page --
2013-06-04 23:45 What's cooking in git.git (Jun 2013, #02; Tue, 4) Junio C Hamano
2013-06-05  0:04 ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Junio C Hamano
2013-06-05  3:02   ` David Lang
2013-06-05 14:30     ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-05  4:13   ` Michael Haggerty
2013-06-05 17:41     ` Junio C Hamano
2013-06-06 12:52     ` Matthieu Moy
2013-06-07 16:11       ` Junio C Hamano
2013-06-06 19:48     ` Thomas Ferris Nicolaisen
2013-06-05 14:45   ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06  7:26     ` demerphq
2013-06-06  7:46       ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06 12:24         ` Barry Fishman
2013-06-06 13:01           ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06 13:46             ` Barry Fishman
2013-06-06 14:09               ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06 14:41                 ` Barry Fishman
2013-06-06 15:04                   ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06 20:41         ` Charles McGarvey
2013-06-06 14:54   ` Greg Troxel
2013-06-06 15:17     ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06 16:09       ` David Lang
2013-06-06 18:16         ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06 20:29         ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-06 20:19           ` David Lang
2013-06-07 14:24             ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-07 15:20               ` Junio C Hamano
2013-06-07 15:28                 ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-07 19:04                 ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-07 19:27                   ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-07 19:38                     ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-09  2:57                     ` Johannes Schindelin
2013-06-09  9:16                       ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-09 23:29                         ` Junio C Hamano
2013-06-10  4:56                           ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-07 19:55                   ` Junio C Hamano
2013-06-07 20:24                     ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-08  2:23                       ` Duy Nguyen
2013-06-08 10:08                         ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-08 11:20                           ` Duy Nguyen
2013-06-08 12:06                             ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-07 19:21             ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06 17:16       ` Greg Troxel
2013-06-06 18:24         ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06 21:05         ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-06 21:31           ` Dependencies and packaging (Re: [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/) Jonathan Nieder
2013-06-07 19:29             ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06 16:22     ` [Administrivia] On ruby and contrib/ Johannes Schindelin
2013-06-06 20:40       ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-07  3:25         ` Johannes Schindelin
2013-06-07 15:20           ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-07 17:57             ` Matthieu Moy
2013-06-07 18:14               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-07 18:24               ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-07 18:32                 ` Matthieu Moy
2013-06-07 18:48                   ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-07 19:00                     ` Matthieu Moy
2013-06-07 19:10                       ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-07 18:33                 ` Jonathan Nieder
2013-06-07 18:45                   ` Matthew Ruffalo
2013-06-07 18:28               ` Junio C Hamano
2013-06-07 19:14           ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-07 19:41             ` Ramkumar Ramachandra
2013-06-09  2:59               ` Johannes Schindelin
2013-06-08  2:17       ` Duy Nguyen
2013-06-08 10:02         ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-08 11:28           ` Duy Nguyen
2013-06-08 11:56             ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-08 12:07               ` Duy Nguyen
2013-06-08 13:20                 ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-08 17:15                   ` Jeff King
2013-06-08 17:40                     ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-09  0:10                       ` Jeff King
2013-06-09  1:17                         ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-09  2:23                           ` Jeff King
2013-06-09  2:41                             ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-09  3:07         ` Johannes Schindelin
2013-06-05  6:59 ` What's cooking in git.git (Jun 2013, #02; Tue, 4) Johannes Sixt
2013-06-05  7:12   ` Jeff King
2013-06-06  6:34     ` [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows Johannes Sixt
2013-06-06  6:37       ` Jeff King
2013-06-06  6:41         ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06  6:44           ` Jeff King
2013-06-06  6:48             ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-06 17:21             ` Junio C Hamano
2013-06-06 17:40               ` Jeff King
2013-06-07  6:22                 ` Johannes Sixt
2013-06-07 10:12                 ` Erik Faye-Lund
2013-06-07 10:24                   ` Johannes Sixt
2013-06-07 12:00                     ` Erik Faye-Lund
2013-06-07 12:19                       ` Johannes Sixt
2013-06-07 12:46                         ` Erik Faye-Lund
2013-06-07 13:07                           ` Johannes Sixt
2013-06-07 14:20                             ` Erik Faye-Lund
2013-06-10  5:48                               ` [PATCH] mingw: make mingw_signal return the correct handler Johannes Sixt
2013-06-10 11:37                                 ` Erik Faye-Lund
2013-06-10 20:50                                 ` Junio C Hamano
2013-06-09  0:18                   ` [PATCH] t0005: skip signal death exit code test on Windows Jeff King
2013-06-09 20:31                     ` Junio C Hamano
2013-06-10  5:30                       ` Johannes Sixt
2013-06-10 11:38                         ` Erik Faye-Lund
2013-06-06 18:32               ` Felipe Contreras
2013-06-07 10:01       ` Erik Faye-Lund
2013-06-07 10:03         ` Erik Faye-Lund

This is a public inbox, see mirroring instructions
for how to clone and mirror all data and code used for this inbox;
as well as URLs for NNTP newsgroup(s).