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From: Ben Gardon <bgardon@google.com>
To: zhukeqian <zhukeqian1@huawei.com>
Cc: LKML <linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org>, kvm <kvm@vger.kernel.org>,
	Paolo Bonzini <pbonzini@redhat.com>,
	Sean Christopherson <seanjc@google.com>,
	"Wanghaibin (D)" <wanghaibin.wang@huawei.com>
Subject: Re: [RFC PATCH v2 2/2] KVM: x86: Not wr-protect huge page with init_all_set dirty log
Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2021 09:22:12 -0700
Message-ID: <CANgfPd_FceqBOf3j-o91rZ_Ziq4vNj_0SVMrzfDVsr6PrweL4A@mail.gmail.com> (raw)
In-Reply-To: <60894846.1c69fb81.6e765.161bSMTPIN_ADDED_BROKEN@mx.google.com>

On Wed, Apr 28, 2021 at 4:34 AM zhukeqian <zhukeqian1@huawei.com> wrote:
>
> Oh, I have to correct myself.
>
> without this opt:
> first round dirtying: write fault and split large mapping
> second round: write fault
>
> with this opt:
> first round dirtying: no write fault
> second round: write fault and split large mapping
>
> the total test time is expected to be reduced.

Oh yeah, good point. So we should really see the savings in the first
round dirty memory time. Good catch.

>
> On 2021/4/28 0:33, Ben Gardon wrote:
> > On Mon, Apr 26, 2021 at 10:04 PM Keqian Zhu < zhukeqian1@huawei.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi Ben,
> >>
> >> Sorry for the delay reply!
> >>
> >> On 2021/4/21 0:30, Ben Gardon wrote:
> >>> On Tue, Apr 20, 2021 at 12:49 AM Keqian Zhu < zhukeqian1@huawei.com> wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> Hi Ben,
> >>>>
> >>>> On 2021/4/20 3:20, Ben Gardon wrote:
> >>>>> On Fri, Apr 16, 2021 at 1:25 AM Keqian Zhu < zhukeqian1@huawei.com> wrote:
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Currently during start dirty logging, if we're with init-all-set,
> >>>>>> we write protect huge pages and leave normal pages untouched, for
> >>>>>> that we can enable dirty logging for these pages lazily.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Actually enable dirty logging lazily for huge pages is feasible
> >>>>>> too, which not only reduces the time of start dirty logging, also
> >>>>>> greatly reduces side-effect on guest when there is high dirty rate.
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> Signed-off-by: Keqian Zhu < zhukeqian1@huawei.com>
> >>>>>> ---
> >>>>>> arch/x86/kvm/mmu/mmu.c | 48 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++----
> >>>>>> arch/x86/kvm/x86.c     | 37 +++++++++-----------------------
> >>>>>> 2 files changed, 54 insertions(+), 31 deletions(-)
> >>>>>>
> >>>>>> diff --git a/arch/x86/kvm/mmu/mmu.c b/arch/x86/kvm/mmu/mmu.c
> >>>>>> index 2ce5bc2ea46d..98fa25172b9a 100644
> >>>>>> --- a/arch/x86/kvm/mmu/mmu.c
> >>>>>> +++ b/arch/x86/kvm/mmu/mmu.c
> >>>>>> @@ -1188,8 +1188,7 @@ static bool __rmap_clear_dirty(struct kvm *kvm, struct kvm_rmap_head *rmap_head,
> >>>>>>   * @gfn_offset: start of the BITS_PER_LONG pages we care about
> >>>>>>   * @mask: indicates which pages we should protect
> >>>>>>   *
> >>>>>> - * Used when we do not need to care about huge page mappings: e.g. during dirty
> >>>>>> - * logging we do not have any such mappings.
> >>>>>> + * Used when we do not need to care about huge page mappings.
> >>>>>>   */
> >>>>>> static void kvm_mmu_write_protect_pt_masked(struct kvm *kvm,
> >>>>>>                                      struct kvm_memory_slot *slot,
> >>>>>> @@ -1246,13 +1245,54 @@ static void kvm_mmu_clear_dirty_pt_masked(struct kvm *kvm,
> >>>>>>   * It calls kvm_mmu_write_protect_pt_masked to write protect selected pages to
> >>>>>>   * enable dirty logging for them.
> >>>>>>   *
> >>>>>> - * Used when we do not need to care about huge page mappings: e.g. during dirty
> >>>>>> - * logging we do not have any such mappings.
> >>>>>> + * We need to care about huge page mappings: e.g. during dirty logging we may
> >>>>>> + * have any such mappings.
> >>>>>>   */
> >>>>>> void kvm_arch_mmu_enable_log_dirty_pt_masked(struct kvm *kvm,
> >>>>>>                                 struct kvm_memory_slot *slot,
> >>>>>>                                 gfn_t gfn_offset, unsigned long mask)
> >>>>>> {
> >>>>>> +       gfn_t start, end;
> >>>>>> +
> >>>>>> +       /*
> >>>>>> +        * Huge pages are NOT write protected when we start dirty log with
> >>>>>> +        * init-all-set, so we must write protect them at here.
> >>>>>> +        *
> >>>>>> +        * The gfn_offset is guaranteed to be aligned to 64, but the base_gfn
> >>>>>> +        * of memslot has no such restriction, so the range can cross two large
> >>>>>> +        * pages.
> >>>>>> +        */
> >>>>>> +       if (kvm_dirty_log_manual_protect_and_init_set(kvm)) {
> >>>>>> +               start = slot->base_gfn + gfn_offset + __ffs(mask);
> >>>>>> +               end = slot->base_gfn + gfn_offset + __fls(mask);
> >>>>>> +               kvm_mmu_slot_gfn_write_protect(kvm, slot, start, PG_LEVEL_2M);
> >>>>>> +
> >>>>>> +               /* Cross two large pages? */
> >>>>>> +               if (ALIGN(start << PAGE_SHIFT, PMD_SIZE) !=
> >>>>>> +                   ALIGN(end << PAGE_SHIFT, PMD_SIZE))
> >>>>>> +                       kvm_mmu_slot_gfn_write_protect(kvm, slot, end,
> >>>>>> +                                                      PG_LEVEL_2M);
> >>>>>> +       }
> >>>>>> +
> >>>>>> +       /*
> >>>>>> +        * RFC:
> >>>>>> +        *
> >>>>>> +        * 1. I don't return early when kvm_mmu_slot_gfn_write_protect() returns
> >>>>>> +        * true, because I am not very clear about the relationship between
> >>>>>> +        * legacy mmu and tdp mmu. AFAICS, the code logic is NOT an if/else
> >>>>>> +        * manner.
> >>>>>> +        *
> >>>>>> +        * The kvm_mmu_slot_gfn_write_protect() returns true when we hit a
> >>>>>> +        * writable large page mapping in legacy mmu mapping or tdp mmu mapping.
> >>>>>> +        * Do we still have normal mapping in that case? (e.g. We have large
> >>>>>> +        * mapping in legacy mmu and normal mapping in tdp mmu).
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Right, we can't return early because the two MMUs could map the page
> >>>>> in different ways, but each MMU could also map the page in multiple
> >>>>> ways independently.
> >>>>> For example, if the legacy MMU was being used and we were running a
> >>>>> nested VM, a page could be mapped 2M in EPT01 and 4K in EPT02, so we'd
> >>>>> still need kvm_mmu_slot_gfn_write_protect calls for both levels.
> >>>>> I don't think there's a case where we can return early here with the
> >>>>> information that the first calls to kvm_mmu_slot_gfn_write_protect
> >>>>> access.
> >>>> Thanks for the detailed explanation.
> >>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>> +        *
> >>>>>> +        * 2. kvm_mmu_slot_gfn_write_protect() doesn't tell us whether the large
> >>>>>> +        * page mapping exist. If it exists but is clean, we can return early.
> >>>>>> +        * However, we have to do invasive change.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> What do you mean by invasive change?
> >>>> We need the kvm_mmu_slot_gfn_write_protect to report whether all mapping are large
> >>>> and clean, so we can return early. However it's not a part of semantics of this function.
> >>>>
> >>>> If this is the final code, compared to old code, we have an extra gfn_write_protect(),
> >>>> I don't whether it's acceptable?
> >>>
> >>> Ah, I see. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I think that in order
> >>> to check that the only mappings on the GFN range are large, we'd still
> >>> have to go over the rmap for the 4k mappings, at least for the legacy
> >>> MMU. In that case, we're doing about as much work as the extra
> >>> gfn_write_protect and I don't think that we'd get any efficiency gain
> >>> for the change in semantics.
> >>>
> >>> Likewise for the TDP MMU, if the GFN range is mapped both large and
> >>> 4k, it would have to be in different TDP structures, so the efficiency
> >>> gains would again not be very big.
> >> I am not familiar with the MMU virtualization of x86 arch, but I think
> >> you are right.
> >>
> >>>
> >>> I'm really just guessing about those performance characteristics
> >>> though. It would definitely help to have some performance data to back
> >>> all this up. Even just a few runs of the dirty_log_perf_test (in
> >>> selftests) could provide some interesting results, and I'd be happy to
> >>> help review any improvements you might make to that test.
> >>>
> >>> Regardless, I'd be inclined to keep this change as simple as possible
> >>> for now and the early return optimization could happen in a follow-up
> >>> patch. I think the extra gfn_write_protect is acceptable, especially
> >>> if you can show that it doesn't cause a big hit in performance when
> >>> running the dirty_log_perf_test with 4k and 2m backing memory.
> >> I tested it using dirty_log_perf_test, the result shows that performance
> >> of clear_dirty_log different within 2%.
> >
> > I think there are a couple obstacles which make the stock
> > dirty_log_perf_test less useful for measuring this optimization.
> >
> > 1. Variance between runs
> > With only 16 vCPUs and whatever the associated default guest memory
> > size is, random system events and daemons introduce a lot of variance,
> > at least in my testing. I usually try to run the biggest VM I can to
> > smooth that out, but even with a 96 vCPU VM, a 2% difference is often
> > not statistically significant. CPU pinning for the vCPU threads would
> > help a lot to reduce variance. I don't remember if anyone has
> > implemented this yet.
> Yes, this makes sense.
>
> >
> > 2. The guest dirty pattern
> > By default, each guest vCPU will dirty it's entire partition of guest
> > memory on each iteration. This means that instead of amortizing out
> > the cost of write-protecting and splitting large pages, we simply move
> > the burden later in the process. I see you didn't include the time for
> > each iteration below, but I would expect this patch to move some of
> > the time from "Enabling dirty logging time" and "Dirtying memory time"
> > for pass 1 to "Clear dirty log time" and "Dirtying memory time" for
> > pass 2. I wouldn't expect the total time over 5 iterations to change
> > for this test.
> If we have large page mapping and are with this optimization, the "Enabling dirty logging time"
> and the first round "Dirtying memory time" will be greatly reduced.
>
> However, I don't think other times (dirty_memory except first round, get_log, clear_log) are
> expected to change compared to w/o optimization. Because after the first round "Dirtying memory",
> all mappings have been split to normal mappings, so the situation is same as w/o this optimization.
>
> Maybe I miss something?
>
> >
> > It would probably also serve us well to have some kind of "hot" subset
> > of memory for each vCPU, since some of the benefit of lazy large page
> > splitting depend on that access pattern.
> >
> > 3. Lockstep dirtying and dirty log collection
> > While this test is currently great for timing dirty logging
> > operations, it's not great for trickier analysis, especially
> > reductions to guest degradation. In order to measure that we'd need to
> > change the test to collect the dirty log as quickly as possible,
> > independent of what the guest is doing and then also record how much
> > "progress" the guest is able to make while all that is happening.
> Yes, make sense.
>
> Does the "dirty log collection" contains "dirty log clear"? As I understand, the dirty log
> collection is very fast, just some memory copy. But for "dirty log clear", we should modify mappings
> and perform TLBI, the time is much longer.

Yeah, sorry. By dirty log collection I meant get + clear since the
test does both before it waits for the guest to dirty all memory
again.

>
> >
> > I'd be happy to help review any improvements to the test which you
> > feel like making.
> Thanks, Ben. emm... I feel very sorry that perhaps I don't have enough time to do this, many works are queued...
> On the other hand, I think the "Dirtying memory time" of first round can show us the optimization.

No worries, I think this is a good patch either way. No need to block
on test improvements, from my perspective.

>
> >
> >>
> >> *Without this patch*
> >>
> >> ./dirty_log_perf_test -i 5 -v 16 -s anonymous
> >>
> >> Testing guest mode: PA-bits:ANY, VA-bits:48, 4K pages
> >> guest physical test memory offset: 0xffbfffff000
> >> Populate memory time: 3.105203579s
> >> Enabling dirty logging time: 0.000323444s
> >> [...]
> >> Get dirty log over 5 iterations took 0.000595033s. (Avg 0.000119006s/iteration)
> >> Clear dirty log over 5 iterations took 0.713212922s. (Avg 0.142642584s/iteration)
> >>
> >> ./dirty_log_perf_test -i 5 -v 16 -s anonymous_hugetlb
> >>
> >> Testing guest mode: PA-bits:ANY, VA-bits:48, 4K pages
> >> guest physical test memory offset: 0xffbfffff000
> >> Populate memory time: 3.922764235s
> >> Enabling dirty logging time: 0.000316473s
> >> [...]
> >> Get dirty log over 5 iterations took 0.000485459s. (Avg 0.000097091s/iteration)
> >> Clear dirty log over 5 iterations took 0.603749670s. (Avg 0.120749934s/iteration)
> >>
> >>
> >> *With this patch*
> >>
> >> ./dirty_log_perf_test -i 5 -v 16 -s anonymous
> >>
> >> Testing guest mode: PA-bits:ANY, VA-bits:48, 4K pages
> >> guest physical test memory offset: 0xffbfffff000
> >> Populate memory time: 3.244515198s
> >> Enabling dirty logging time: 0.000280207s
> >> [...]
> >> Get dirty log over 5 iterations took 0.000484953s. (Avg 0.000096990s/iteration)
> >> Clear dirty log over 5 iterations took 0.727620114s. (Avg 0.145524022s/iteration)
> >>
> >> ./dirty_log_perf_test -i 5 -v 16 -s anonymous_hugetlb
> >>
> >> Testing guest mode: PA-bits:ANY, VA-bits:48, 4K pages
> >> guest physical test memory offset: 0xffbfffff000
> >> Populate memory time: 3.244294061s
> >> Enabling dirty logging time: 0.000273590s
> >> [...]
> >> Get dirty log over 5 iterations took 0.000474244s. (Avg 0.000094848s/iteration)
> >> Clear dirty log over 5 iterations took 0.600593672s. (Avg 0.120118734s/iteration)
> >>
> >>
> >> I faced a problem that there is no huge page mapping when test with
> >> "-s anonymous_hugetlb", both for TDP enabled or disabled.
> >
> > Do you mean that even before dirty logging was enabled, KVM didn't
> > create any large mappings? That's odd. I would assume the backing
> > memory allocation would just fail if there aren't enough hugepages
> > available.
> It's odd indeed. I can see there are large mapping when I do normal migration, but I
> don't see large mapping when run this test.
>
> I have proofed the time of "clear dirty log" is not effected, what about send a
> formal patch?

That sounds good to me.

>
> Thanks,
> Keqian
>

  parent reply index

Thread overview: 11+ messages / expand[flat|nested]  mbox.gz  Atom feed  top
2021-04-16  8:25 [RFC PATCH v2 0/2] KVM: x86: Enable dirty logging lazily for huge pages Keqian Zhu
2021-04-16  8:25 ` [RFC PATCH v2 1/2] KVM: x86: Support write protect gfn with min_level Keqian Zhu
2021-04-16  8:25 ` [RFC PATCH v2 2/2] KVM: x86: Not wr-protect huge page with init_all_set dirty log Keqian Zhu
2021-04-19 19:20   ` Ben Gardon
2021-04-20  7:49     ` Keqian Zhu
2021-04-20 16:30       ` Ben Gardon
2021-04-27  5:03         ` Keqian Zhu
2021-04-27 16:33           ` Ben Gardon
2021-04-28 10:51             ` Keqian Zhu
     [not found]               ` <60894846.1c69fb81.6e765.161bSMTPIN_ADDED_BROKEN@mx.google.com>
2021-04-28 16:22                 ` Ben Gardon [this message]
2021-04-29  3:30                   ` Keqian Zhu

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