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* RE: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
@ 2002-09-24 23:29 Rhoads, Rob
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Rhoads, Rob @ 2002-09-24 23:29 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: 'Greg KH', Rhoads, Rob; +Cc: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'

> From: Greg KH [mailto:greg@kroah.com]
> On Tue, Sep 24, 2002 at 02:46:35PM -0700, Rhoads, Rob wrote:
> > 
> > First throw away any idea of a spec. That was a bad idea. :)
> > 
> > Next, turn the first section, "Stability & Reliability" of our 
> > original doc into a "Driver Hardening HOWTO". It would be a 
> > list of characteristics that all good drivers should have, 
> > packed with examples to back it up. 
> 
> Sounds very good.  I recommend that it be written in DocBook and added
> to the Documentation/DocBook directory of the kernel tree.

Agreed. :-)

> 
> > BTW, by no means did I or anyone involved on this project, ever 
> > mean to imply that the current drivers in the kernel are "bad". 
> > Rather, I'd like to capture a list of the best practices and 
> > document them. In any event our current list needs to be 
> > strengthened with concrete examples. My thinking is that we 
> > should work with the Kernel Janitor project. This is where 
> > Intel can probably really help out.
> 
> Great, the janitor project can really use extra people to help out.  I
> suggest that you read over their TODO list again and pick up 
> the pieces
> from there that are missing from your "Driver Hardening HOWTO".

I will do.

[snip]

> 
> It would be wonderful if there were some good FI tools that were
> available for our use.  It can only help to make better drivers.
> 
> Thank you for your response, and for listening to the community.
> 
> greg k-h
>

-RobR

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-24 21:46 Rhoads, Rob
@ 2002-09-24 23:07 ` Greg KH
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Greg KH @ 2002-09-24 23:07 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Rhoads, Rob; +Cc: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'

On Tue, Sep 24, 2002 at 02:46:35PM -0700, Rhoads, Rob wrote:
> 
> First throw away any idea of a spec. That was a bad idea. :)
> 
> Next, turn the first section, "Stability & Reliability" of our 
> original doc into a "Driver Hardening HOWTO". It would be a 
> list of characteristics that all good drivers should have, 
> packed with examples to back it up. 

Sounds very good.  I recommend that it be written in DocBook and added
to the Documentation/DocBook directory of the kernel tree.

> BTW, by no means did I or anyone involved on this project, ever 
> mean to imply that the current drivers in the kernel are "bad". 
> Rather, I'd like to capture a list of the best practices and 
> document them. In any event our current list needs to be 
> strengthened with concrete examples. My thinking is that we 
> should work with the Kernel Janitor project. This is where 
> Intel can probably really help out.

Great, the janitor project can really use extra people to help out.  I
suggest that you read over their TODO list again and pick up the pieces
from there that are missing from your "Driver Hardening HOWTO".

> The section on Instrumentation should be broken up and each piece 
> dealt with separately as separate project. Most likely killed outright 
> or as part of existing efforts. I see this section as not having
> anything to do with driver hardening and more to do with driver RAS.

Agreed.

> POSIX Event Logging-- is a dead issue. The mailing list feedback 
> is making that point very clear, many thanks. The current
> thread on an alternative, seems like there is some sort of need
> for event logging. Whatever the final decision that the Linux 
> community decides, we'll do.

Thanks for listening.

> There seems to be a desire to have some sort of driver diagnostics.
> We can work on that with the existing linux-diag project.

Sounds good.  I know those people are actively working to get their code
into the 2.5 kernel, using the driver model.  This is a good thing.

> Statistics needs to be debated on its own merits. There are some 
> arguments for keeping it, but I think that stats could be better 
> handled in user-space and NOT kernel space. IMHO it's not driver 
> hardening, therefore it's a separate project. 

Agreed, it should be done in userspace.

> Third, the most of the section on High Availability should just 
> be axed. The big exception being "fault injection testing". 
> 
> I see value in keeping FI testing. I think that getting FI 
> tools into the hands of developers would be worthwhile. Why? 
> Because letting people do more complicated testing, produces 
> better code. I think there is room for us to work on a set of 
> FI tools.

It would be wonderful if there were some good FI tools that were
available for our use.  It can only help to make better drivers.

Thank you for your response, and for listening to the community.

greg k-h

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* RE: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
@ 2002-09-24 21:46 Rhoads, Rob
  2002-09-24 23:07 ` Greg KH
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 21+ messages in thread
From: Rhoads, Rob @ 2002-09-24 21:46 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: 'Greg KH', Rhoads, Rob; +Cc: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'

> From: Greg KH [mailto:greg@kroah.com]
> 
[snip]
> 
> > An underlying theme tends to revolve around the binding
> > of the concepts of 'hardening' and RAS features being 
> > added to drivers.  We will be looking into splitting 
> > these two different approaches out from this singular 
> > document and into their appropriate locations.
> 
> Where would these locations be?
> 

First throw away any idea of a spec. That was a bad idea. :)

Next, turn the first section, "Stability & Reliability" of our 
original doc into a "Driver Hardening HOWTO". It would be a 
list of characteristics that all good drivers should have, 
packed with examples to back it up. 

BTW, by no means did I or anyone involved on this project, ever 
mean to imply that the current drivers in the kernel are "bad". 
Rather, I'd like to capture a list of the best practices and 
document them. In any event our current list needs to be 
strengthened with concrete examples. My thinking is that we 
should work with the Kernel Janitor project. This is where 
Intel can probably really help out.

The section on Instrumentation should be broken up and each piece 
dealt with separately as separate project. Most likely killed outright 
or as part of existing efforts. I see this section as not having
anything to do with driver hardening and more to do with driver RAS.

POSIX Event Logging-- is a dead issue. The mailing list feedback 
is making that point very clear, many thanks. The current
thread on an alternative, seems like there is some sort of need
for event logging. Whatever the final decision that the Linux 
community decides, we'll do.

There seems to be a desire to have some sort of driver diagnostics.
We can work on that with the existing linux-diag project.

Statistics needs to be debated on its own merits. There are some 
arguments for keeping it, but I think that stats could be better 
handled in user-space and NOT kernel space. IMHO it's not driver 
hardening, therefore it's a separate project. 

Third, the most of the section on High Availability should just 
be axed. The big exception being "fault injection testing". 

I see value in keeping FI testing. I think that getting FI 
tools into the hands of developers would be worthwhile. Why? 
Because letting people do more complicated testing, produces 
better code. I think there is room for us to work on a set of 
FI tools.

> > If you are interested (even if you aren't) please go 
> > to http://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/hardeneddrivers-discuss 
> and subscribe to the mailing list.
>
> Sorry, but major kernel driver discussions should occur on lkml.
> 
> thanks,
> 
> greg k-h


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-24 19:30 Rhoads, Rob
@ 2002-09-24 19:55 ` Greg KH
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Greg KH @ 2002-09-24 19:55 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Rhoads, Rob; +Cc: linux-kernel, hardeneddrivers-discuss, cgl_discussion

On Tue, Sep 24, 2002 at 12:30:28PM -0700, Rhoads, Rob wrote:
> 
> That said, I will go back and address the specific questions that
> you and others have asked.

Thank you.

greg k-h

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* RE: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
@ 2002-09-24 19:30 Rhoads, Rob
  2002-09-24 19:55 ` Greg KH
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 21+ messages in thread
From: Rhoads, Rob @ 2002-09-24 19:30 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: 'Greg KH', Rhoads, Rob
  Cc: linux-kernel, hardeneddrivers-discuss, cgl_discussion

> 
> On Mon, Sep 23, 2002 at 03:38:32PM -0700, Rhoads, Rob wrote:
> > I appreciate all the feedback. Based on the wide variety 
> > of ideas/comments, it looks like I need to go back and 
> > incorporate these ideas into the document, potentially 
> > changing areas in major ways where appropriate.    
> 
> Not to be a pest, but I, and a lot of other people, posted some very
> specific questions in response to both your original posting, and in
> response to the published specification and published code.  
> It would be
> considered proper etiquette if you would at least try to respond to
> _some_ of these questions, as you did ask for them, rather 
> than stating
> that you are going to go mull over everything and come back with a
> modified document.

I've been overwhelmed with the hailstorm of posts hitting 
my mailbox, since I made the project announcement.

> 
> If you don't, any expectations of people reviewing future specs, or
> proposals from this project should be kept quite low.
> 

The responses I have received have fallen into several buckets:

1. INTEL???? wtf?  You're evil.  Go away.
2. Good goal; bad approach.
3. Good goal, bad approach in places, here are areas for improvement.
4. Good goal, here are my thoughts and questions on X.

Keep in mind the original post was the announcement of a new project.
Sure, there was a big document with lots of information--but the 
project is STARTING.  Not ending; personally I didn't think that 
there would be huge following on LKML.  I thought those interested
in the topic would read the spec we have, see where they like it 
and where they don't and then hopefully give me feedback to make 
the spec and the results better.  This isn't something that 
can be solved overnight.

What I'm seeing from the messages is that a lot of people have 
been thinking about this topic, and a lot of people have ideas 
on how they think the problems best solved.

Areas of common desire to be looked at:

1. validate kernel interfaces (i.e.: kernel janitor)
2. common logging mechanisms (i.e.: not POSIX logging)
3. validation/testing tools capabilities
4. driver-howto; best known methods by kernel driver 
   developers for writing stable maintainable drivers

I am trying to understand what people are looking for so that I 
can provide meaningful posts.

That said, I will go back and address the specific questions that
you and others have asked.

> thanks,
> 
> greg k-h
> 

-RobR

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-23 22:38 ` Rhoads, Rob
  2002-09-24  0:08   ` Greg KH
@ 2002-09-24 17:12   ` Greg KH
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Greg KH @ 2002-09-24 17:12 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Rhoads, Rob; +Cc: linux-kernel, hardeneddrivers-discuss, cgl_discussion

On Mon, Sep 23, 2002 at 03:38:32PM -0700, Rhoads, Rob wrote:
> I appreciate all the feedback. Based on the wide variety 
> of ideas/comments, it looks like I need to go back and 
> incorporate these ideas into the document, potentially 
> changing areas in major ways where appropriate.    

Not to be a pest, but I, and a lot of other people, posted some very
specific questions in response to both your original posting, and in
response to the published specification and published code.  It would be
considered proper etiquette if you would at least try to respond to
_some_ of these questions, as you did ask for them, rather than stating
that you are going to go mull over everything and come back with a
modified document.

If you don't, any expectations of people reviewing future specs, or
proposals from this project should be kept quite low.

thanks,

greg k-h

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-23 22:38 ` Rhoads, Rob
@ 2002-09-24  0:08   ` Greg KH
  2002-09-24 17:12   ` Greg KH
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Greg KH @ 2002-09-24  0:08 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Rhoads, Rob; +Cc: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'

On Mon, Sep 23, 2002 at 03:38:32PM -0700, Rhoads, Rob wrote:
> 
> Rather than bog down this mailing list with exchanges, 
> I would like to move this discussion to the hardened 
> driver mailing list.  Please don't feel like I'm 
> ignoring your feedback--just moving the forum.

No, please don't move this off to another mailing list.  This is where
the majority of all kernel programmers are, don't try to make us move to
yet-another-mailing-list just to discuss your project.  If you want our
contributions, and want our input, use this list.

If you stay on smaller mailing lists, like cg-discuss and
hardened-drivers, you do not reach the widest group of people, which is
what you will have to do if you want to have a chance for your
contributions to become part of the main kernel.

> An underlying theme tends to revolve around the binding
> of the concepts of 'hardening' and RAS features being 
> added to drivers.  We will be looking into splitting 
> these two different approaches out from this singular 
> document and into their appropriate locations.

Where would these locations be?

> If you are interested (even if you aren't) please go 
> to http://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/hardeneddrivers-discuss 
> and subscribe to the mailing list.

Sorry, but major kernel driver discussions should occur on lkml.

thanks,

greg k-h

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* RE: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
@ 2002-09-23 22:38 ` Rhoads, Rob
  2002-09-24  0:08   ` Greg KH
  2002-09-24 17:12   ` Greg KH
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Rhoads, Rob @ 2002-09-23 22:38 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'

I appreciate all the feedback. Based on the wide variety 
of ideas/comments, it looks like I need to go back and 
incorporate these ideas into the document, potentially 
changing areas in major ways where appropriate.    

Rather than bog down this mailing list with exchanges, 
I would like to move this discussion to the hardened 
driver mailing list.  Please don't feel like I'm 
ignoring your feedback--just moving the forum.

An underlying theme tends to revolve around the binding
of the concepts of 'hardening' and RAS features being 
added to drivers.  We will be looking into splitting 
these two different approaches out from this singular 
document and into their appropriate locations.

If you are interested (even if you aren't) please go 
to http://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/hardeneddrivers-discuss 
and subscribe to the mailing list.

+=+=+
Rob Rhoads                     mailto:rob.rhoads@intel.com
Staff Software Engineer        office: 503-677-5498
Telecom Software Platforms
Intel Communications Group

This email message solely contains my own personal views, and not
necessarily those of my employer.


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
@ 2002-09-23 13:23 Manfred Spraul
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Manfred Spraul @ 2002-09-23 13:23 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Lars Marowsky-Bree; +Cc: linux-kernel, Rhoads, Rob

Lars Marowsky-Bree <lmb@suse.de> wrote:
 >
> I fully support the idea to audit the Linux device drivers - using guidelines,
> hardware fault injection, stress testing etc - and fixing any potential bugs.
> This is obviously a very important task, because the drivers are some of the
> most ugly code I've seen in the kernel.
> 

Are there any recipies for stress testing drivers?
I have my own list of stress tests I run on my network drivers, but the 
list is more or less random:

http://www.colorfullife.com/~manfred/net-stress/net-stresstest.txt

--
	Manfred


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-21  0:26 Rhoads, Rob
                   ` (2 preceding siblings ...)
  2002-09-23  6:13 ` Randy.Dunlap
@ 2002-09-23 12:31 ` Lars Marowsky-Bree
  2002-09-23 22:38 ` Rhoads, Rob
  4 siblings, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Lars Marowsky-Bree @ 2002-09-23 12:31 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Rhoads, Rob, 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'

On 2002-09-20T17:26:47,
   "Rhoads, Rob" <rob.rhoads@intel.com> said:

Hi Rob,

I fully support the idea to audit the Linux device drivers - using guidelines,
hardware fault injection, stress testing etc - and fixing any potential bugs.
This is obviously a very important task, because the drivers are some of the
most ugly code I've seen in the kernel.

"Pro-active monitoring", ie by basically gathering whatever statistics are
available and feeding them to some sort of user-space application and then
trying to deduce a potential failure is also a very valuable goal; so exposing
more statistics seems definetely good, too. As long as that doesn't introduce
even more errors...

Any help you can offer on the above is surely appreciated by all involved and
will have a direct, positive impact on Linux.

That said, and the fluff in your specification aside (which was very likely
necessary for management ;-), your spec certainly contains some good points on
how to write stable and robust code. (Aside from the comments the others have
raised already regarding event logging and that of course all recommendations
need to be thoughtfully applied to the case in question)

The statistics can best be exposed via driverfs or /proc (for kernels which
don't have driverfs); however, the statistics analyser nor the SNMP agent
pre-processing belong into the kernel itself. Keep the drivers as lean as
possible, that will introduce less errors at this level. I object to the CSM
being in kernel space. Having a more or less common API for the statistics to
be gathered and exposed by the drivers would be highly valuable indeed though.

What are your further timelines?

A lot of the above - ie, audit and test current drivers - can be done without
(at least not with much more) further planning; I'm always rather amazed at
how much effort Intel, IBM and their child OSDL spent on pretty specifications
which could also be applied to real work ;-)



Sincerely,
    Lars Marowsky-Brée <lmb@suse.de>

-- 
Principal Squirrel
Research and Development, SuSE Linux AG
 
``Immortality is an adequate definition of high availability for me.''
	--- Gregory F. Pfister


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-21  0:26 Rhoads, Rob
  2002-09-21  1:06 ` Andre Hedrick
  2002-09-21  1:40 ` Greg KH
@ 2002-09-23  6:13 ` Randy.Dunlap
  2002-09-23 12:31 ` Lars Marowsky-Bree
  2002-09-23 22:38 ` Rhoads, Rob
  4 siblings, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Randy.Dunlap @ 2002-09-23  6:13 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Rhoads, Rob
  Cc: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org',
	cgl_discussion, hardeneddrivers-discuss

On Fri, 20 Sep 2002, Rhoads, Rob wrote:

| Project Announcement:
| --------------------
|
| Initially we've created a specification, a few kernel modules
| that implement a set of driver programming interfaces, and
| a sample device driver that demonstrates those interfaces.
| -

Only addressing spec bugs for now.
More comments tomorrow when I'm more awake.

section
3.1.1.1	"Table 2 takes a closer look at the fields...."
	No, it doesn't.

3.2.3	"The CONFIG_DRIVER_STATISTICS flag...."
	but section 5.1 calls it CONFIG_DRIVER_STATS.

3.3.2	"The CONFIG_DRIVER_STATISTICS build configuration option"
	should be CONFIG_DRIVER_DIAGNOSTICS
	and change "statistics support" to "diagnostics support"

3.4.2.7.3, example 2:  missing final '|' after "%s"

3.4.3.8.1, Comments on #defines:
	aren't several of these backwards?

3.4.3.8.3, last #define:  bad font change.

-- 
~Randy


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-21 10:41   ` Bernd Eckenfels
@ 2002-09-21 11:20     ` Russell King
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Russell King @ 2002-09-21 11:20 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Bernd Eckenfels; +Cc: linux-kernel

On Sat, Sep 21, 2002 at 12:41:59PM +0200, Bernd Eckenfels wrote:
> In article <Pine.LNX.4.10.10209201753310.25090-100000@master.linux-ide.org> you wrote:
> > Regardless, it takes (fill in the blank) to boldly ask people to add APIs
> > for an industry who is only interested in using and not contributing.
> 
> There is more than one industry interested in it. It simply sucks if your
> kernel panic only because you remove a SCSI cable. IT also sucks if your
> kernel panics only vecause you have a bad block on a Disk.

Both of which I'd classify as bugs.  I recently submitted a few patches
that fix some of the idiotic or bad error handling in the 2.4 SCSI
layer.  Although they didn't completely fix some of the problems, it
did highlight some of the problem areas.

> On the other hand, the reason this has not
> happend just shows us, that it is not trivial to find a second person which
> understands hardware's error behaviour.

Or people with broken hardware don't report that the error paths are
broken; they just fix their hardware.

I have a Syquest 270MB drive here.  Bought from new, but it has never
worked 100% properly.  It mostly complains about media errors and the
like.  After several rounds with Syquest, I lost faith in it.  However,
I still have it.  Why?

I keep test filesystems on the cartridges.  Perfect when I want to run
some tests that could well take out a filesystem, or when I want to test
out the SCSI error handling.  That's how I found that the 2.4 SCSI error
handling code has the possibility to eat disks alive when it encounters
an error.

Would extra API's have helped find this?  Would it have made the driver
more stable?  Would it have caught the bug in my SCSI driver that caused
it not to request sense on error and therefore throw the SCSI subsystem
into a never-ending loop?  The answers are: no, no, no.

Would testing with broken hardware have found this?  Would it make the
driver more stable?  Yes, and yes.

IMO, driver stability comes with testing and review by people who know
both the hardware _and_ who know the kernel API inside out.  There seems
to be a lack the latter, and a lack of people with broken hardware for
the former.

So next time when your hard disk develops media errors, or your network
card starts corrupting data, think about whether it would be a useful
test device to someone.  (Obviously not if its completely 100% dead.)

-- 
Russell King (rmk@arm.linux.org.uk)                The developer of ARM Linux
             http://www.arm.linux.org.uk/personal/aboutme.html


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-21  1:06 ` Andre Hedrick
@ 2002-09-21 10:41   ` Bernd Eckenfels
  2002-09-21 11:20     ` Russell King
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 21+ messages in thread
From: Bernd Eckenfels @ 2002-09-21 10:41 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: linux-kernel

In article <Pine.LNX.4.10.10209201753310.25090-100000@master.linux-ide.org> you wrote:
> Regardless, it takes (fill in the blank) to boldly ask people to add APIs
> for an industry who is only interested in using and not contributing.

There is more than one industry interested in it. It simply sucks if your
kernel panic only because you remove a SCSI cable. IT also sucks if your
kernel panics only vecause you have a bad block on a Disk.

Companies which build carrier grade Linux Systems (like HP, IBM and SGI _do_
contribute on making Linux an Enterprise System).

So personal I find this project good, and adding the Linux Testing community
is needed. But I dont think that a lot of new APIs is needed in the first
place. (Well, possibly for things like path failover/md somebody needs to
define an actual error handling, like it is done currently), but "debugging"
all drivers by review is needed. On the other hand, the reason this has not
happend just shows us, that it is not trivial to find a second person which
understands hardware's error behaviour.

Greetings
Bernd

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-21  3:00 Rhoads, Rob
  2002-09-21  3:47 ` Andre Hedrick
@ 2002-09-21  4:09 ` Mark Veltzer
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Mark Veltzer @ 2002-09-21  4:09 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Rhoads, Rob, Linux kernel mailing list

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

> This project is open to anyone who wants to participate and is
> being paid for by Intel and a host of other companies. The
> idea is to enable Linux to play in the Carrier space with all
> the work given away under the GPL.

Enable Linux to play in the Carrier space. That IS interesting. This is, I 
expect, as opposed to all the other operating systems which run on Intel 
platforms which are already robust and already play in the "Carrier space" ?
The patronization of commercial companies never ceases to amaze me...

Let me reverse this: Intel wants to play in the Carrier space and needs Linux 
to do it... Ok. Now we've got it right. I think this is what other posters 
thought of as "taking". Intel has everything to gain here since it was never 
a player in the "Carrier space".

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying NO to free code but if we really have to 
come face to face with the truth then it's quite obvious from history that 
commercial companies aren't that hot when it comes to coding (it's my general 
experience that code that comes out of commercial companies needs to be more 
heavily reviewed bacause marketing/featurism and deadlines produce bad 
code...).

Regarding marketing slogans. Even a bad mouse driver can screw up your 
system. This means that you just have to write good driver code. I certainly 
wouldn't want all of this commercial bla bla to turn into a big fat API where 
old and new semantics are mixed and are not clear like in the "other" carrier 
grade operating system which is well known and runs on Intel. APIs have to be 
as lean as possible with robust semantics. This should not change and this is 
actually the chief strength of Linux (because all driver code is available 
the API is quite mature and robust). All that is left to do is improve driver 
code. So why don't you call the project "Driver improvement project" or 
something like that and drop the commercial bla bla. Under this title the 
project has probably been going on (under some form or another) since 1991.

> What paying professional developers to work on an Open Source project
> and giving their work away under the terms of the GPL isn't enough?

You mean when Intel finally gets a real operating system to run on it's 
machines for PRACTICALLY NOTHING ?!? I think Intel is getting a real sweet 
deal here. I would love to be a chip maker and get a full operating system 
(with thousands of applications and a full desktops) for the price of a few 
developers. Also the big commercial noise that such a project would generate 
would probably win a few fat accounts away from SUN eh ?!?

BTW: would you be paying developers to work on other architecture drivers too 
? ! ? That would be interesting but I guess the answer is no... This is a 
major problem since the arsenal of tools at the disposal of a driver coder in 
Linux is quite generic (with regard to platform). When you aim to produce a 
driver just for i386 you tend to hardcode x86 details into your driver which 
makes for a bad driver since using the platform agnostic Linux arsenal would 
probably produce a better driver. You do code for x86 but if you are 
developing a mixed set of drivers (for different archs) then you tend to 
understand the generic tools semantics better and use them better which in 
turn produces better drivers. It may sound strange but when coding in Linux 
you're better off being familiar with several archs and working on details of 
several archs because you tend to produce better drivers that way (even if 
the drivers are arch specific). The generic tools that you mentioned 
(regarding more robust error handling etc..) which seem to me like 
improvements in API would certainly need to be approved for ALL architectures 
which in turn will need a big janitor type project which means that it's out 
of this development cycle.

Mark.
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^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* RE: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-21  3:00 Rhoads, Rob
@ 2002-09-21  3:47 ` Andre Hedrick
  2002-09-21  4:09 ` Mark Veltzer
  1 sibling, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Andre Hedrick @ 2002-09-21  3:47 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Rhoads, Rob; +Cc: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'

On Fri, 20 Sep 2002, Rhoads, Rob wrote:

> > Obvious this is a way for the telecom folks to get something 
> > for free that
> > really should be paid for by funding the project with CASH.  
> > Or funding (a) startup(s) related to generating such support.
> >
> > Regardless, it takes (fill in the blank) to boldly ask people 
> > to add APIs
> > for an industry who is only interested in using and not contributing.
> > Prove that all the stuff which is going to be plugged into these
> > security-hole^Wbug-generators^Wfeatures will be scheduled for 
> > open source.
> 
> This project is open to anyone who wants to participate and is
> being paid for by Intel and a host of other companies. The 

Explain how it is paid and to whom?

> idea is to enable Linux to play in the Carrier space with all
> the work given away under the GPL.

Re-Phase, "Carrier space" needs Linux to succeed.


> > Or this another attempt to try and take over the license and shove BSD
> > down the piles?
> 
> The project is open and released under the terms of the GPL. 

Okay, is there not a cause for loading "closed source modules" via the new
API's and management tools?

> > PS: I see a lot of "wants", are there any "gives" ?
> 
> What paying professional developers to work on an Open Source project 
> and giving their work away under the terms of the GPL isn't enough?

I am sorry, I do not understand the context.

I give away lots of work which is paid for by various companies who desire
broarder support for their product.  If I recall correctly, Intel is a
promoter of Serial ATA, yet it took another vendor whose interest in
working with the open source community funded the "free release" of a
generic IOPS driver layer change, and the crossover support for various
archs.  Just so you know, they are totally aware the release of the
project would also enable their competion.  They are betting their product
is superior and put the money down to prove it!

So why not have the "Carrier" people post a list of tasks to be completed
and the monetary value and let the opensource community play in the
bidding process to earn the contract?

You specify it to be totally open source and IP generated shall be demeed
public and not open for patents.

Will the carrier folks step up to the BAR and do the right thing by the
many individuals in the community or shield themselves in wordy
specifications and compliance terms?

Please point out why this is wrong?

Cheers,

Andre Hedrick
LAD Storage Consulting Group


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-21  2:14 ` Pete Zaitcev
@ 2002-09-21  3:30   ` Andre Hedrick
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Andre Hedrick @ 2002-09-21  3:30 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Pete Zaitcev; +Cc: linux-kernel

On Fri, 20 Sep 2002, Pete Zaitcev wrote:

> > Obvious this is a way for the telecom folks to get something for free that
> > really should be paid for by funding the project with CASH.  Or funding
> > (a) startup(s) related to generating such support.
> 
> Andre, if I read you right, you are articulating the following
> idea: "Those guys collect drivers written by students and try
> to run them in production. Of course, it cannot work. If paid
> professionals wrote them, there would be no problem."

You can read that into it sure, how about reading the other side.
Also Pete, you know me better than to paint me into that corner so bogus.
Treat the students as professionals, as they will be soon enough.

Sheesh, fund a university project to get the fresh young minds to derive
the future fabric.  Regardless if the students are paid or offerred
scholarships in return, would it not be a "WIN-WIN" for "ALL"?
Now the cherry on top comes to a few or many who are super talented, and
find they have a career resulting from the work.

> If this is what you are saying here, it is very misguided.
> I had a chance to examine some of drivers written by paid
> professionals, and the picture was pretty bleak. Also, the
> problem of hardening is not unique to Linux or Open Source,
> I had runs with it before.
> 
> So, I do not think there's a budgetary issue here. I talked to
> the C-G Linux folks at OLS, and they do have funding. But I do

So if this is true, where is the sign up list for contracts based on
deliverables?  

> not think the hardening is going to fly the way they push it,
> for two technical reasons.
> 
>  First, you cannot race crappy driver writers. As soon as you
> harden and qualify something, technology changes and brings
> a whole bunch of crappy drivers.

No but a legal binding contract of deliverables will bring those along who
rise to the challenge, correct?

>  Second, the resulting "hardened" system is no less fragile than
> it was before.

Erm, more likely the basic infrastucture for permiting in-band device
recovery and communication pathways back to the requesting thread or
application above is what appears to be lacking, but then again I could be
wrong.

> If I was going the C-G Linux, I would abandon the "hardening"
> efforts as they are now, and shift in-house hackers to work on
> clusters and UML (including a cluster or UMLs).
> 
> As far as giving goes, the C-G people expended a lot of effort
> on documentation of their wishes (again, judging by their OLS
> performance). And I mean *A F. LOT* of effort. If they
> coded as much as they wrote reports and reviews, we'd probably
> have something working by now.

Nice, so they do a great dog-n-pony show?

Cheers,

Andre Hedrick
LAD Storage Consulting Group


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* RE: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
@ 2002-09-21  3:00 Rhoads, Rob
  2002-09-21  3:47 ` Andre Hedrick
  2002-09-21  4:09 ` Mark Veltzer
  0 siblings, 2 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Rhoads, Rob @ 2002-09-21  3:00 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: 'Andre Hedrick'; +Cc: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'

> Obvious this is a way for the telecom folks to get something 
> for free that
> really should be paid for by funding the project with CASH.  
> Or funding (a) startup(s) related to generating such support.
>
> Regardless, it takes (fill in the blank) to boldly ask people 
> to add APIs
> for an industry who is only interested in using and not contributing.
> Prove that all the stuff which is going to be plugged into these
> security-hole^Wbug-generators^Wfeatures will be scheduled for 
> open source.

This project is open to anyone who wants to participate and is
being paid for by Intel and a host of other companies. The 
idea is to enable Linux to play in the Carrier space with all
the work given away under the GPL.

> Or this another attempt to try and take over the license and shove BSD
> down the piles?

The project is open and released under the terms of the GPL. 

> 
> Pointed Blunt Raw, but nice.
> 
> Regards,
> 
> Andre Hedrick
> LAD Storage Consulting Group
> 
> PS: I see a lot of "wants", are there any "gives" ?

What paying professional developers to work on an Open Source project 
and giving their work away under the terms of the GPL isn't enough?

+=+=+
Rob Rhoads                     mailto:rob.rhoads@intel.com
Staff Software Engineer        office: 503-677-5498
Telecom Software Platforms     
Intel Communications Group

This email message solely contains my own personal views, and not
necessarily those of my employer.


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
       [not found] <mailman.1032570840.22498.linux-kernel2news@redhat.com>
@ 2002-09-21  2:14 ` Pete Zaitcev
  2002-09-21  3:30   ` Andre Hedrick
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 21+ messages in thread
From: Pete Zaitcev @ 2002-09-21  2:14 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Andre Hedrick; +Cc: linux-kernel

> Obvious this is a way for the telecom folks to get something for free that
> really should be paid for by funding the project with CASH.  Or funding
> (a) startup(s) related to generating such support.

Andre, if I read you right, you are articulating the following
idea: "Those guys collect drivers written by students and try
to run them in production. Of course, it cannot work. If paid
professionals wrote them, there would be no problem."

If this is what you are saying here, it is very misguided.
I had a chance to examine some of drivers written by paid
professionals, and the picture was pretty bleak. Also, the
problem of hardening is not unique to Linux or Open Source,
I had runs with it before.

So, I do not think there's a budgetary issue here. I talked to
the C-G Linux folks at OLS, and they do have funding. But I do
not think the hardening is going to fly the way they push it,
for two technical reasons.

 First, you cannot race crappy driver writers. As soon as you
harden and qualify something, technology changes and brings
a whole bunch of crappy drivers.

 Second, the resulting "hardened" system is no less fragile than
it was before.

If I was going the C-G Linux, I would abandon the "hardening"
efforts as they are now, and shift in-house hackers to work on
clusters and UML (including a cluster or UMLs).

As far as giving goes, the C-G people expended a lot of effort
on documentation of their wishes (again, judging by their OLS
performance). And I mean *A F. LOT* of effort. If they
coded as much as they wrote reports and reviews, we'd probably
have something working by now.

-- Pete

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-21  0:26 Rhoads, Rob
  2002-09-21  1:06 ` Andre Hedrick
@ 2002-09-21  1:40 ` Greg KH
  2002-09-23  6:13 ` Randy.Dunlap
                   ` (2 subsequent siblings)
  4 siblings, 0 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Greg KH @ 2002-09-21  1:40 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Rhoads, Rob; +Cc: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'

Hi,

I've just started to read over the published spec, and will reserve
comment on it, and the example code you've created after I'm done
reading it.  But I'll make a few comments right now on your
announcement:


On Fri, Sep 20, 2002 at 05:26:47PM -0700, Rhoads, Rob wrote:
> 
> Project Announcement:
> --------------------
> We've started a new project on sourceforge.net w/ focus 
> on hardening Linux device drivers for highly available 
> systems. This project is being worked on with folks from 
> OSDL's CGL and DCL projects as well.

Who is "we"?

> Hardened Driver Project Overview:
> --------------------------------
> Device drivers have traditionally been a significant source 
> of software faults. For this reason, they are of key concern
> in improving the availability and stability of the operating
> system. A critical element in creating Highly Available (HA)
> environment is to reduce the likelihood of faults in key 
> drivers, a methodology called driver hardening. 

Or in simpler terms, making drivers that work, right?
Do you have any statistics that show that existing Linux drivers are a
problem with HA systems?  If so, which drivers?

> A device driver is typically implemented with emphasis on 
> the proper operation of the hardware. Attention to how it 
> will function in the event of hardware faults is often 
> minimal.

Ah, a broad generalization, very nice to set up for the reasoning behind
your project.  But is this really true?  Lots of existing kernel drivers
can handle a wide range of hardware faults, and user faults.  Again, do
people have any specific problems with existing drivers, or driver
subsystems?

> The goal of a hardened driver is to provide an environment 
> in which hardware and software failures are transparent to 
> the applications using their services, where possible. The 
> way to effectively achieve this goal is to analyze a 
> driver's software design and implement appropriate changes
> to improve stability, reliability and availability, and 
> to provide instrumentation for management middleware.

So in order to achieve reliable drivers, we want to add more lines of
code to the driver to allow for instrumentation?  What happens when the
fault happens in the instrumentation interface?  And what is watching
this interface for problems in it's handling of data?

> We believe that improving driver stability and reliability 
> includes such measures as ensuring that all wait loops are
> limited with a timeout, validating input and output data and
> structuring the driver to anticipate hardware errors. 

All good things to achieve.  Have you looked at the kernel-janitors
project?  There are lots of places where you all can jump in to achieve
this right now in the existing code.  Patches for these items are always
welcome, a spec is not needed :)

> Improving availability includes adding support for device
> hot swapping and validating the driver with fault injection.

Hot-swap needs to have hardware that can support this.  Linux currently
supports these kinds of hardware configurations (USB, IEEE1294, PCI
Hotplug, cPCI Hotplug, hotplug CPU, etc.)  Are there existing types of
hardware that is present in your systems that do not have support on
Linux?  And if so, creating drivers for this hardware would be greatly
appreciated.

As for "fault injection", this traditionally requires hardware test
setups that are beyond the means of most kernel programmers.  Will your
group be providing access to this kind of hardware for kernel developers
to test their drivers with?

> Instrumentation for management middleware includes functions
> such as reporting of statistical indicators and logging of 
> pertinent events to enable postmortem analysis in the event
> of a failure.

Um, about this middleware management layer, are you talking about
RAS-style kernel logging?  If so, please see the archives about why the
current implementation of this has been rejected by the kernel
community.

> We've identified four areas in which drivers can be hardened:
> o Hardening with code robustness

You mean the driver core?  That should be a requirement of any Linux
kernel driver today, hardened or not.  So all Linux drivers already meet
this, right?  If not, please let us know and they will be fixed.

> o Hardening with event logging

See the above comment about RAS.

> o Hardening with diagnostics

Ah, but most hardware does not support diagnostics.  What do you do
suggest be done for this?

> o Hardening with resource monitoring and statistics

The middle management layer, right?  I'll get into my response of this
once I've gone over the spec.

> We've also identified some key areas we feel are most critical
> to overall system stability and plan to focus initial hardening 
> efforts on drivers for network interface cards, physical storage, 
> and logical storage.

In a quick look at your example code and documentation, this is all for
the 2.4 kernel.  As the 2.5 deadline is almost a month away, do you have
any intention of trying to get these features and layers into the 2.5
kernel?  And if not, are you willing to wait until the 2.7 kernel is
opened up?

That's probably enough questions for now :)

thanks,

greg k-h

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* Re: [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
  2002-09-21  0:26 Rhoads, Rob
@ 2002-09-21  1:06 ` Andre Hedrick
  2002-09-21 10:41   ` Bernd Eckenfels
  2002-09-21  1:40 ` Greg KH
                   ` (3 subsequent siblings)
  4 siblings, 1 reply; 21+ messages in thread
From: Andre Hedrick @ 2002-09-21  1:06 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Rhoads, Rob; +Cc: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'


Hi Rob,

My opinion only, and you may think it "stinks" ... oh well.

Obvious this is a way for the telecom folks to get something for free that
really should be paid for by funding the project with CASH.  Or funding
(a) startup(s) related to generating such support.

Regardless, it takes (fill in the blank) to boldly ask people to add APIs
for an industry who is only interested in using and not contributing.
Prove that all the stuff which is going to be plugged into these
security-hole^Wbug-generators^Wfeatures will be scheduled for open source.
Or this another attempt to try and take over the license and shove BSD
down the piles?

Pointed Blunt Raw, but nice.

Regards,

Andre Hedrick
LAD Storage Consulting Group

PS: I see a lot of "wants", are there any "gives" ?


On Fri, 20 Sep 2002, Rhoads, Rob wrote:

> 
> Project Announcement:
> --------------------
> We've started a new project on sourceforge.net w/ focus 
> on hardening Linux device drivers for highly available 
> systems. This project is being worked on with folks from 
> OSDL's CGL and DCL projects as well.
> 
> Initially we've created a specification, a few kernel modules
> that implement a set of driver programming interfaces, and
> a sample device driver that demonstrates those interfaces.
> 
> We are actively soliciting involvement with others in the 
> Linux developer community. We need your help to make this 
> project relevant and useful. 

We need your CAPITAL to pay for our TIME.

> Below I've included an overview of the hardened driver project. 
> By no means is this complete or final. It's just our initial
> attempt at defining what is meant by the term hardened driver
> and the areas we want to focus on.

Great, do they serve the needs of more than "INTEL"?

> For additional info, please checkout the links at the bottom 
> of this message and the Hardened Drivers web site at 
> http://hardeneddrivers.sf.net.
> 
> 
> Hardened Driver Project Overview:
> --------------------------------
> Device drivers have traditionally been a significant source 
> of software faults. For this reason, they are of key concern
> in improving the availability and stability of the operating
> system. A critical element in creating Highly Available (HA)
> environment is to reduce the likelihood of faults in key 
> drivers, a methodology called driver hardening. 
> 
> A device driver is typically implemented with emphasis on 
> the proper operation of the hardware. Attention to how it 
> will function in the event of hardware faults is often 
> minimal. Hardened drivers, on the other hand, are designed
> with the assumption that the underlying hardware that they
> control will fail. They need to respond to such failures by
> handling faults gracefully, limiting the impact on the overall
> system. Hardened device drivers must continue to operate when 
> the hardware has failed (e.g. allow device fail-over), and 
> must not allow the propagation of corrupt data from a failed 
> device to other components of the system.
> 
> Hardened device drivers must also be active participants in 
> the recovery of detected faults, by locally recovering them or
> by reporting them to higher-level system management software 
> that subsequently instructs the driver to take a specific 
> action.
> 
> The goal of a hardened driver is to provide an environment 
> in which hardware and software failures are transparent to 
> the applications using their services, where possible. The 
> way to effectively achieve this goal is to analyze a 
> driver's software design and implement appropriate changes
> to improve stability, reliability and availability, and 
> to provide instrumentation for management middleware.
> 
> We believe that improving driver stability and reliability 
> includes such measures as ensuring that all wait loops are
> limited with a timeout, validating input and output data and
> structuring the driver to anticipate hardware errors. 
> Improving availability includes adding support for device
> hot swapping and validating the driver with fault injection.
> Instrumentation for management middleware includes functions
> such as reporting of statistical indicators and logging of 
> pertinent events to enable postmortem analysis in the event
> of a failure.
> 
> To minimize instability contributed by device drivers and to 
> enhance the availability of HA systems, we've attempted to 
> define a set of requirements that a device driver should 
> adhere to in order to be considered a hardened driver. We 
> then define different hardening traits and the required 
> programming interfaces to support these hardening traits.
> 
> We've identified four areas in which drivers can be hardened:
> o Hardening with code robustness
> o Hardening with event logging
> o Hardening with diagnostics
> o Hardening with resource monitoring and statistics
> 
> We've also identified some key areas we feel are most critical
> to overall system stability and plan to focus initial hardening 
> efforts on drivers for network interface cards, physical storage, 
> and logical storage.
> 
> Project Links:
> -------------
> o The Driver Hardening website:  
>   http://hardeneddrivers.sourceforge.net
> 
> o The SourceForge project related info:
>   http://sourceforge.net/projects/hardeneddrivers
> 
> o Hardened Drivers Mailing List Info (subscribe here):
>   http://lists.sourceforge.net/mailman/listinfo/hardeneddrivers-discuss
> 
> 
> +=+=+
> Rob Rhoads                     mailto:rob.rhoads@intel.com
> Staff Software Engineer        office: 503-677-5498
> Telecom Software Platforms
> Intel Communications Group
> 
> This email message solely contains my own personal views, and not
> necessarily those of my employer.
> 
> -
> To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe linux-kernel" in
> the body of a message to majordomo@vger.kernel.org
> More majordomo info at  http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html
> Please read the FAQ at  http://www.tux.org/lkml/
> 



^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

* [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project
@ 2002-09-21  0:26 Rhoads, Rob
  2002-09-21  1:06 ` Andre Hedrick
                   ` (4 more replies)
  0 siblings, 5 replies; 21+ messages in thread
From: Rhoads, Rob @ 2002-09-21  0:26 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: 'linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org'; +Cc: Rhoads, Rob


Project Announcement:
--------------------
We've started a new project on sourceforge.net w/ focus 
on hardening Linux device drivers for highly available 
systems. This project is being worked on with folks from 
OSDL's CGL and DCL projects as well.

Initially we've created a specification, a few kernel modules
that implement a set of driver programming interfaces, and
a sample device driver that demonstrates those interfaces.

We are actively soliciting involvement with others in the 
Linux developer community. We need your help to make this 
project relevant and useful. 

Below I've included an overview of the hardened driver project. 
By no means is this complete or final. It's just our initial
attempt at defining what is meant by the term hardened driver
and the areas we want to focus on.

For additional info, please checkout the links at the bottom 
of this message and the Hardened Drivers web site at 
http://hardeneddrivers.sf.net.


Hardened Driver Project Overview:
--------------------------------
Device drivers have traditionally been a significant source 
of software faults. For this reason, they are of key concern
in improving the availability and stability of the operating
system. A critical element in creating Highly Available (HA)
environment is to reduce the likelihood of faults in key 
drivers, a methodology called driver hardening. 

A device driver is typically implemented with emphasis on 
the proper operation of the hardware. Attention to how it 
will function in the event of hardware faults is often 
minimal. Hardened drivers, on the other hand, are designed
with the assumption that the underlying hardware that they
control will fail. They need to respond to such failures by
handling faults gracefully, limiting the impact on the overall
system. Hardened device drivers must continue to operate when 
the hardware has failed (e.g. allow device fail-over), and 
must not allow the propagation of corrupt data from a failed 
device to other components of the system.

Hardened device drivers must also be active participants in 
the recovery of detected faults, by locally recovering them or
by reporting them to higher-level system management software 
that subsequently instructs the driver to take a specific 
action.

The goal of a hardened driver is to provide an environment 
in which hardware and software failures are transparent to 
the applications using their services, where possible. The 
way to effectively achieve this goal is to analyze a 
driver's software design and implement appropriate changes
to improve stability, reliability and availability, and 
to provide instrumentation for management middleware.

We believe that improving driver stability and reliability 
includes such measures as ensuring that all wait loops are
limited with a timeout, validating input and output data and
structuring the driver to anticipate hardware errors. 
Improving availability includes adding support for device
hot swapping and validating the driver with fault injection.
Instrumentation for management middleware includes functions
such as reporting of statistical indicators and logging of 
pertinent events to enable postmortem analysis in the event
of a failure.

To minimize instability contributed by device drivers and to 
enhance the availability of HA systems, we've attempted to 
define a set of requirements that a device driver should 
adhere to in order to be considered a hardened driver. We 
then define different hardening traits and the required 
programming interfaces to support these hardening traits.

We've identified four areas in which drivers can be hardened:
o Hardening with code robustness
o Hardening with event logging
o Hardening with diagnostics
o Hardening with resource monitoring and statistics

We've also identified some key areas we feel are most critical
to overall system stability and plan to focus initial hardening 
efforts on drivers for network interface cards, physical storage, 
and logical storage.

Project Links:
-------------
o The Driver Hardening website:  
  http://hardeneddrivers.sourceforge.net

o The SourceForge project related info:
  http://sourceforge.net/projects/hardeneddrivers

o Hardened Drivers Mailing List Info (subscribe here):
  http://lists.sourceforge.net/mailman/listinfo/hardeneddrivers-discuss


+=+=+
Rob Rhoads                     mailto:rob.rhoads@intel.com
Staff Software Engineer        office: 503-677-5498
Telecom Software Platforms
Intel Communications Group

This email message solely contains my own personal views, and not
necessarily those of my employer.


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 21+ messages in thread

end of thread, other threads:[~2002-09-24 23:24 UTC | newest]

Thread overview: 21+ messages (download: mbox.gz / follow: Atom feed)
-- links below jump to the message on this page --
2002-09-24 23:29 [ANNOUNCE] Linux Hardened Device Drivers Project Rhoads, Rob
  -- strict thread matches above, loose matches on Subject: below --
2002-09-24 21:46 Rhoads, Rob
2002-09-24 23:07 ` Greg KH
2002-09-24 19:30 Rhoads, Rob
2002-09-24 19:55 ` Greg KH
2002-09-23 13:23 Manfred Spraul
2002-09-21  3:00 Rhoads, Rob
2002-09-21  3:47 ` Andre Hedrick
2002-09-21  4:09 ` Mark Veltzer
     [not found] <mailman.1032570840.22498.linux-kernel2news@redhat.com>
2002-09-21  2:14 ` Pete Zaitcev
2002-09-21  3:30   ` Andre Hedrick
2002-09-21  0:26 Rhoads, Rob
2002-09-21  1:06 ` Andre Hedrick
2002-09-21 10:41   ` Bernd Eckenfels
2002-09-21 11:20     ` Russell King
2002-09-21  1:40 ` Greg KH
2002-09-23  6:13 ` Randy.Dunlap
2002-09-23 12:31 ` Lars Marowsky-Bree
2002-09-23 22:38 ` Rhoads, Rob
2002-09-24  0:08   ` Greg KH
2002-09-24 17:12   ` Greg KH

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