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From: General Zed <general-zed@zedlx.com>
To: Zygo Blaxell <ce3g8jdj@umail.furryterror.org>
Cc: "Austin S. Hemmelgarn" <ahferroin7@gmail.com>,
	linux-btrfs@vger.kernel.org
Subject: Re: Feature requests: online backup - defrag - change RAID level
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2019 17:23:21 -0400
Message-ID: <20190912172321.Horde.oyDNseL4IVWz-QYWBqgXqjO@server53.web-hosting.com> (raw)
In-Reply-To: <20190912051904.GD22121@hungrycats.org>


Quoting Zygo Blaxell <ce3g8jdj@umail.furryterror.org>:

> On Wed, Sep 11, 2019 at 07:21:31PM -0400, webmaster@zedlx.com wrote:
>>
>> Quoting Zygo Blaxell <ce3g8jdj@umail.furryterror.org>:
>>
>> > On Wed, Sep 11, 2019 at 01:20:53PM -0400, webmaster@zedlx.com wrote:
>> > >
>> > > Quoting "Austin S. Hemmelgarn" <ahferroin7@gmail.com>:
>> > >
>> > > > On 2019-09-10 19:32, webmaster@zedlx.com wrote:
>> > > > >
>> > > > > Quoting "Austin S. Hemmelgarn" <ahferroin7@gmail.com>:
>> > > > >
>> > >
>> > > > >
>> > > > > === I CHALLENGE you and anyone else on this mailing list: ===
>> > > > >
>> > > > >  - Show me an exaple where splitting an extent requires unsharing,
>> > > > > and this split is needed to defrag.
>> > > > >
>> > > > > Make it clear, write it yourself, I don't want any  
>> machine-made outputs.
>> > > > >
>> > > > Start with the above comment about all writes unsharing the  
>> region being
>> > > > written to.
>> > > >
>> > > > Now, extrapolating from there:
>> > > >
>> > > > Assume you have two files, A and B, each consisting of 64 filesystem
>> > > > blocks in single shared extent.  Now assume somebody writes a  
>> few bytes
>> > > > to the middle of file B, right around the boundary between  
>> blocks 31 and
>> > > > 32, and that you get similar writes to file A straddling blocks 14-15
>> > > > and 47-48.
>> > > >
>> > > > After all of that, file A will be 5 extents:
>> > > >
>> > > > * A reflink to blocks 0-13 of the original extent.
>> > > > * A single isolated extent consisting of the new blocks 14-15
>> > > > * A reflink to blocks 16-46 of the original extent.
>> > > > * A single isolated extent consisting of the new blocks 47-48
>> > > > * A reflink to blocks 49-63 of the original extent.
>> > > >
>> > > > And file B will be 3 extents:
>> > > >
>> > > > * A reflink to blocks 0-30 of the original extent.
>> > > > * A single isolated extent consisting of the new blocks 31-32.
>> > > > * A reflink to blocks 32-63 of the original extent.
>> > > >
>> > > > Note that there are a total of four contiguous sequences of  
>> blocks that
>> > > > are common between both files:
>> > > >
>> > > > * 0-13
>> > > > * 16-30
>> > > > * 32-46
>> > > > * 49-63
>> > > >
>> > > > There is no way to completely defragment either file without splitting
>> > > > the original extent (which is still there, just not fully  
>> referenced by
>> > > > either file) unless you rewrite the whole file to a new single extent
>> > > > (which would, of course, completely unshare the whole file).  In fact,
>> > > > if you want to ensure that those shared regions stay  
>> reflinked, there's
>> > > > no way to defragment either file without _increasing_ the number of
>> > > > extents in that file (either file would need 7 extents to  
>> properly share
>> > > > only those 4 regions), and even then only one of the files could be
>> > > > fully defragmented.
>> > > >
>> > > > Such a situation generally won't happen if you're just dealing with
>> > > > read-only snapshots, but is not unusual when dealing with  
>> regular files
>> > > > that are reflinked (which is not an uncommon situation on  
>> some systems,
>> > > > as a lot of people have `cp` aliased to reflink things whenever
>> > > > possible).
>> > >
>> > > Well, thank you very much for writing this example. Your example is
>> > > certainly not minimal, as it seems to me that one write to the  
>> file A and
>> > > one write to file B would be sufficient to prove your point, so there we
>> > > have one extra write in the example, but that's OK.
>> > >
>> > > Your example proves that I was wrong. I admit: it is impossible  
>> to perfectly
>> > > defrag one subvolume (in the way I imagined it should be done).
>> > > Why? Because, as in your example, there can be files within a SINGLE
>> > > subvolume which share their extents with each other. I didn't  
>> consider such
>> > > a case.
>> > >
>> > > On the other hand, I judge this issue to be mostly irrelevant.  
>> Why? Because
>> > > most of the file sharing will be between subvolumes, not within  
>> a subvolume.
>> > > When a user creates a reflink to a file in the same subvolume, he is
>> > > willingly denying himself the assurance of a perfect defrag. Because, as
>> > > your example proves, if there are a few writes to BOTH files, it gets
>> > > impossible to defrag perfectly. So, if the user creates such  
>> reflinks, it's
>> > > his own whish and his own fault.
>> > >
>> > > Such situations will occur only in some specific circumstances:
>> > > a) when the user is reflinking manually
>> > > b) when a file is copied from one subvolume into a different file in a
>> > > different subvolume.
>> > >
>> > > The situation a) is unusual in normal use of the filesystem.  
>> Even when it
>> > > occurs, it is the explicit command given by the user, so he should be
>> > > willing to accept all the consequences, even the bad ones like imperfect
>> > > defrag.
>> > >
>> > > The situation b) is possible, but as far as I know copies are  
>> currently not
>> > > done that way in btrfs. There should probably be the option to  
>> reflink-copy
>> > > files fron another subvolume, that would be good.
>> >
>> > Reflink copies across subvolumes have been working for years.  They are
>> > an important component that makes dedupe work when snapshots are present.
>>
>> I take that what you say is true, but what I said is that when a user (or
>> application) makes a
>> normal copy from one subvolume to another, then it won't be a reflink-copy.
>> To make such a reflink-copy, you need btrfs-aware cp or btrfs-aware
>> applications.
>
> It's the default for GNU coreutils, and for 'mv' across subvols there
> is currently no option to turn reflink copies off.  Maybe for 'cp'
> you still have to explicitly request reflink, but that will presumably
> change at some point as more filesystems get the CLONE_RANGE ioctl and
> more users expect it to just work by default.

Yes, thank you for posting another batch of arguments that support the  
use of my vision of defrag instead of the current one.

The defrag that I'm proposing will preserve all those reflinks that  
were painstakingly created by the user. Therefore, I take that you  
agree with me on the utmost importance of implementing this new defrag  
that I'm proposing.

>> So, the reflik-copy is a special case, usually explicitly requested by the
>> user.
>>
>> > > But anyway, it doesn't matter. Because most of the sharing will  
>> be between
>> > > subvolumes, not within subvolume.
>> >
>> > Heh.  I'd like you to meet one of my medium-sized filesystems:
>> >
>> > 	Physical size:  8TB
>> > 	Logical size:  16TB
>> > 	Average references per extent:  2.03 (not counting snapshots)
>> > 	Workload:  CI build server, VM host
>> >
>> > That's a filesystem where over half of the logical data is reflinks to the
>> > other physical data, and 94% of that data is in a single subvol.  7.5TB of
>> > data is unique, the remaining 500GB is referenced an average of 17 times.
>> >
>> > We use ordinary applications to make ordinary copies of files, and do
>> > tarball unpacks and source checkouts with reckless abandon, all day long.
>> > Dedupe turns the copies into reflinks as we go, so every copy becomes
>> > a reflink no matter how it was created.
>> >
>> > For the VM filesystem image files, it's not uncommon to see a high
>> > reflink rate within a single file as well as reflinks to other files
>> > (like the binary files in the build directories that the VM images are
>> > constructed from).  Those reference counts can go into the millions.
>>
>> OK, but that cannot be helped: either you retain the sharing structure with
>> imperfect defrag, or you unshare and produce a perfect defrag which should
>> have somewhat better performance (and pray that the disk doesn't fill up).
>
> One detail that might not have been covered in the rest of the discussion
> is that btrfs extents are immutable.  e.g. if you create a 128MB file,
> then truncate it to 4K, it still takes 128MB on disk because that 4K
> block at the beginning holds a reference to the whole immutable 128MB
> extent.  This holds even if the extent is not shared.  The 127.996MB of
> unreferenced extent blocks are unreachable until the last 4K reference
> is removed from the filesystem (deleted or overwritten).
>
> There is no "split extent in place" operation on btrfs because the
> assumption that extents are immutable is baked into the code.  Changing
> this has been discussed a few times.  The gotcha is that some fairly
> ordinary write cases can trigger updates of all extent references if
> extents were split automatically as soon as blocks become unreachable.
> There's non-trivial CPU overhead to determine whether blocks are
> unreachable, making it unsuitable to run the garbage collector during
> ordinary writes.  So for now, the way to split an extent is to copy the
> data you want to keep from the extent into some new extents, then remove
> all references to the old extent.

There, I don't even need to write a solution. You are getting better.

I suggest that btrfs should first try to determine whether it can  
split an extent in-place, or not. If it can't do that, then it should  
create new extents to split the old one.

> To maintain btrfs storage efficiency you have to do a *garbage collection*
> operation that there is currently no tool for.  This tool would find
> unreachable blocks and split extents around them, releasing the entire
> extent (including unreachable blocks) back to the filesystem.  Defrag is
> sometimes used for its accidental garbage collection side-effects (it
> will copy all the remaining reachable blocks to new extents and reduce
> total space usage if the extens were not shared), but the current defrag
> is not designed for GC, and doesn't do a good job.

Yes, you have to determine which blocks are unused, and to do that you  
have to analyze all the b-trees. Only the defrag can do this. And, it  
should do this.

Notice that doing this garbage collection gets much easier when the  
defrag has created, in-memory, the two arrays I described in another  
part of this discussion, namely:
  - "extent-backref" associative array
  - "region-extents" plain array

Since defrag is supposed to have this two arrays always in memory and  
always valid and in-sync, doing this "garbage collection" becomes  
quite easy, even trivial.

Therefore, the defrag can free unused parts of any extent, and then  
the extent can be split is necessary. In fact, both these operations  
can be done simultaneously.

> Dedupe on btrfs also requires the ability to split and merge extents;
> otherwise, we can't dedupe an extent that contains a combination of
> unique and duplicate data.  If we try to just move references around
> without splitting extents into all-duplicate and all-unique extents,
> the duplicate blocks become unreachable, but are not deallocated.  If we
> only split extents, fragmentation overhead gets bad.  Before creating
> thousands of references to an extent, it is worthwhile to merge it with
> as many of its neighbors as possible, ideally by picking the biggest
> existing garbage-free extents available so we don't have to do defrag.
> As we examine each extent in the filesystem, it may be best to send
> to defrag, dedupe, or garbage collection--sometimes more than one of
> those.

This is sovled simply by always running defrag before dedupe.

> As extents get bigger, the seeking and overhead to read them gets smaller.
> I'd want to defrag many consecutive 4K extents, but I wouldn't bother
> touching 256K extents unless they were in high-traffic files, nor would I
> bother combining only 2 or 3 4K extents together (there would be around
> 400K of metadata IO overhead to do so--likely more than what is saved
> unless the file is very frequently read sequentially).  The incremental
> gains are inversely proportional to size, while the defrag cost is
> directly proportional to size.

"the defrag cost is directly proportional to size" - this is wrong.  
The defrag cost is proportional to file size, not to extent size.

Before a file is defragmented, the defrag should split its extents so  
that each one is sufficiently small, let's say 32 MB at most. That  
fixes the issue. This was mentioned in my answer to Austin S.  
Hemmelgarn.

Then, as the final stage of the defrag, the extents should be merged  
into bigger ones of desired size.

>> > > So, if there is some in-subvolume sharing,
>> > > the defrag wont be 100% perfect, that a minor point. Unimportant.
>> >
>> > It's not unimportant; however, the implementation does have to take this
>> > into account, and make sure that defrag can efficiently skip extents that
>> > are too expensive to relocate.  If we plan to read an extent fewer than
>> > 100 times, it makes no sense to update 20000 references to it--we spend
>> > less total time just doing the 100 slower reads.
>>
>> Not necesarily. Because you can defrag in the time-of-day when there is a
>> low pressure on the disk IO, so updating 20000 references is esentially
>> free.
>>
>> You are just making those later 100 reads faster.
>>
>> OK, you are right, there is some limit, but this is such a rare case, that
>> such a heavily-referenced extents are best left untouched.
>
> For you it's rare.  For other users, it's expected behavior--dedupe is
> just a thing many different filesystems do now.

This is a tiny detail not worthy of consideration at this stage of  
planning. It can be solved.

> Also, quite a few heavily-fragmented files only ever get read once,
> or are read only during low-cost IO times (e.g. log files during
> maintenance windows).  For those, a defrag is pure wasted iops.

You don't know that because you can't predict the future. Therefore,  
defrag is never a waste because the future is unknown.

>> I suggest something along these lines: if there are more than XX (where XX
>> defaults to 1000) reflinks to an extent, then one or more copies of the
>> extent should be made such that each has less than XX reflinks to it. The
>> number XX should be user-configurable.
>
> That would depend on where those extents are, how big the references
> are, etc.  In some cases a million references are fine, in other cases
> even 20 is too many.  After doing the analysis for each extent in a
> filesystem, you'll probably get an average around some number, but
> setting the number first is putting the cart before the horse.

This is a tiny detail not worthy of consideration at this stage of  
planning. It can be solved.

>> > If the numbers are
>> > reversed then it's better to defrag the extent--100 reference updates
>> > are easily outweighed by 20000 faster reads.  The kernel doesn't have
>> > enough information to make good decisions about this.
>>
>> So, just make the number XX user-provided.
>>
>> > Dedupe has a similar problem--it's rarely worth doing a GB of IO to
>> > save 4K of space, so in practical implementations, a lot of duplicate
>> > blocks have to remain duplicate.
>> >
>> > There are some ways to make the kernel dedupe and defrag API process
>> > each reference a little more efficiently, but none will get around this
>> > basic physical problem:  some extents are just better off where they are.
>>
>> OK. If you don't touch those extents, they are still shared. That's what I
>> wanted.
>>
>> > Userspace has access to some extra data from the user, e.g.  "which
>> > snapshots should have their references excluded from defrag because
>> > the entire snapshot will be deleted in a few minutes."  That will allow
>> > better defrag cost-benefit decisions than any in-kernel implementation
>> > can make by itself.
>>
>> Yes, but I think that we are going into too much details which are diverting
>> the attention from the overall picture and from big problems.
>>
>> And the big problem here is: what do we want defrag to do in general, most
>> common cases. Because we haven't still agreed on that one since many of the
>> people here are ardent followers of the defrag-by-unsharing ideology.
>
> Well, that's the current implementation, so most people are familiar with it.
>
> I have a userspace library that lets applications work in terms of extents
> and their sequential connections to logical neighbors, which it extracts
> from the reference data in the filesystem trees.  The caller says "move
> extent A50..A70, B10..B20, and C90..C110 to a new physically contiguous
> location" and the library translates that into calls to the current kernel
> API to update all the references to those extents, at least one of which
> is a single contiguous reference to the entire new extent.  To defrag,
> it walks over extent adjacency DAGs and connects short extents together
> into longer ones, and if it notices opportunities to get rid of extents
> entirely by dedupe then it does that instead of defrag.  Extents with
> unreachable blocks are garbage collected.  If I ever get it done, I'll
> propose the kernel provide the library's top-level interface directly,
> then drop the userspace emulation layer when that kernel API appears.

Actually, many of the problems that you wrote about so far in this  
thread are not problems in my imagined implementation of defrag, which  
can solves them all. The problems you wrote about are mostly problems  
of this implementation/library of yours.

So yes, you can do things that way as in your library, but that is  
inferior to real defrag.

>> > 'btrfs fi defrag' is just one possible userspace implementation, which
>> > implements the "throw entire files at the legacy kernel defrag API one
>> > at a time" algorithm.  Unfortunately, nobody seems to have implemented
>> > any other algorithms yet, other than a few toy proof-of-concept demos.
>>
>> I really don't have a clue what's happening, but if I were to start working
>> on it (which I won't), then the first things should be:
>
>> - creating a way for btrfs to split large extents into smaller ones (for
>> easier defrag, as first phase).
>
>> - creating a way for btrfs to merge small adjanced extents shared by the
>> same files into larger extents (as the last phase of defragmenting a file).
>
> Those were the primitives I found useful as well.  Well, primitive,
> singular--in the absence of the ability to split an extent in place,
> the same function can do both split and merge operations.  Input is a
> list of block ranges, output is one extent containing data from those
> block ranges, side effect is to replace all the references to the old
> data with references to the new data.

Great, so there already exists an implementation, or at least a similar one.

Now, that split and merge just have to be moved into kernel.
  - I would keep merge and split as separate operations.
  - If a split cannot be performed due to problems you mention, then  
it should just return and do nothing. Same with merge.

Eventually, when a real defrag starts to be written, those two (split  
and merge) can be updated to make use of "extent-backref" associative  
array and "region-extents" plain array, so that they can be performed  
more efficiently and so that they always succeed.

> Add an operation to replace references to data at extent A with
> references to data at extent B, and an operation to query extent reference
> structure efficiently, and you have all the ingredients of an integrated
> dedupe/defrag/garbage collection tool for btrfs (analogous to the XFS
> "fsr" process).

Obviously, some very usefull code. That is good, but perhaps it would  
be better for that code to serve as an example of how it can be done.
In my imagined defrag, this updating-of-references happens as part of  
flushing the "pending operations buffer", so it will have to be  
rewritten such that it fits into that framework.

The problem of your defrag is that it is not holistic enough. It has a  
view of only small parts of the filesystem, so it can never be as good  
as a real defrag, which also doesn't unshare extents.

>> - create a structure (associative array) for defrag that can track
>> backlinks. Keep the structure updated with each filesystem change, by
>> placing hooks in filesystem-update routines.
>
> No need.  btrfs already maintains backrefs--they power the online  
> device shrink
> feature and the LOGICAL_TO_INO ioctl.

Another person said that it is complicated to trace backreferences. So  
now you are saying that it is not.
Anyway, such a structure must be available to defrag.
So, just in case to avoid misunderstandings, this "extent-backrefs"  
associative array would be in-memory, it would cover all extents, the  
entire filesystem structure, and it would be kept in-sync with the  
filesystem during the defrag operation.

>> You can't go wrong with this. Whatever details change about defrag
>> operation, the given three things will be needed by defrag.
>
> I agree about 70% with what you said.  ;)

Ok, thanks, finally someone agrees with me, at least 70%. I feel like  
I'm on the shooting range here carrying a target on my back and  
running around.

>> > > Now, to retain the original sharing structure, the defrag has  
>> to change the
>> > > reflink of extent E55 in file B to point to E70. You are  
>> telling me this is
>> > > not possible? Bullshit!
>> >
>> > This is already possible today and userspace tools can do it--not as
>> > efficiently as possible, but without requiring more than 128M of temporary
>> > space.  'btrfs fi defrag' is not one of those tools.
>> >
>> > > Please explain to me how this 'defrag has to unshare' story of  
>> yours isn't
>> > > an intentional attempt to mislead me.
>> >
>> > Austin is talking about the btrfs we have, not the btrfs we want.
>>
>> OK, but then, you agree with me that current defrag is a joke. I mean,
>> something is better than nothing, and the current defrag isn't completely
>> useless, but it is in most circumstances either unusable or not good enough.
>
> I agree that the current defrag is almost useless.  Where we might
> disagree is that I don't think the current defrag can ever be useful,
> even if it did update all the references simultaneously.
>
>> I mean, the snapshots are a prime feature of btrfs. If not, then why bother
>> with b-trees? If you wanted subvolumes, checksums and RAID, then you should
>> have made ext5. B-trees are in btrfs so that there can be snapshots. But,
>> the current defrag works bad with snaphots. It doesn't defrag them well, it
>> also unshares data. Bad bad bad.
>>
>> And if you wanted to be honest to your users, why don't you place this info
>> in the wiki? Ok, the wiki says "defrag will unshare", but it doesn't say
>> that it also doesn't defragment well.
>
> "Well" is the first thing users have trouble with.  They generally
> overvalue defragmentation because they don't consider the costs.
>
> There's a lower bound _and_ an upper bound on how big fragments can
> usefully be.  The lower bound is somewhere around 100K (below that size
> there is egregious seek and metadata overhead), and the upper bound is
> a few MB at most, with a few special exceptions like torrent downloads
> (where a large file is written in random order, then rearranged into
> contiguous extents and never written again).  If you strictly try to
> minimize the number of fragments, you can make a lot of disk space
> unreachable without garbage collection.  Up to 32768 times the logical
> file size can theoretically be wasted, though 25-200% is more common
> in practice.  The bigger your target extent size, the more frequently
> you have to defrag to maintain disk space usage at reasonable levels,
> and the less benefit you get from each defrag run.
>
>> For example, lets examine the typical home user. If he is using btrfs, it
>> means he probably wants snapshots of his data. And, after a few snapshots,
>> his data is fragmented, and the current defrag can't help because it does a
>> terrible job in this particualr case.
>
> I'm not sure I follow.  Snapshots don't cause data fragmentation.

I disagree. I might explain my thoughts in aother place (this post is  
getting too long).

> Discontiguous writes do (unless the filesystem is very full and the
> only available free areas are small--see below).  The data will be
> fragmented or not depending on the write pattern, not the presence or
> absence of snapshots.

> On the other hand, if snapshots are present, then
> (overly aggressive) defrag will consume a large amount of disk space.
> Maybe that's what you're getting at.

Yes. But, any defrag which is based on unsharing will fail in such a  
situation, in one way or another. The arguments for current defrag  
always mention the ways in which it won't fail, forgetting to mention  
that it will ALWAYS fail in at least one, sometimes disastrous way.  
But always a different one. Really, it is an inhonest debate.

> If the filesystem is very full and all free space areas are small,
> you want to use balance to move all the data closer together so that
> free space areas get bigger.  Defrag is the wrong tool for this.
> Balance handles shared extent references just fine.
>
>> So why don't you write on the wiki "the defrag is practically unusable in
>> case you use snapshots". Because that is the truth. Be honest.
>
> It depends on the size of the defragmented data.  If the only thing
> you need to defrag is systemd journal files and the $HOME/.thunderbird
> directory, then you can probably afford to store a few extra copies of
> those on the disk.  It won't be possible to usefully defrag files like
> those while they have shared extents anyway--too many small overlaps.
>
> If you have a filesystem full of big VM image files then there's no
> good solution yet.




  reply index

Thread overview: 111+ messages / expand[flat|nested]  mbox.gz  Atom feed  top
2019-09-09  2:55 zedlryqc
2019-09-09  3:51 ` Qu Wenruo
2019-09-09 11:25   ` zedlryqc
2019-09-09 12:18     ` Qu Wenruo
2019-09-09 12:28       ` Qu Wenruo
2019-09-09 17:11         ` webmaster
2019-09-10 17:39           ` Andrei Borzenkov
2019-09-10 22:41             ` webmaster
2019-09-09 15:29       ` Graham Cobb
2019-09-09 17:24         ` Remi Gauvin
2019-09-09 19:26         ` webmaster
2019-09-10 19:22           ` Austin S. Hemmelgarn
2019-09-10 23:32             ` webmaster
2019-09-11 12:02               ` Austin S. Hemmelgarn
2019-09-11 16:26                 ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-11 17:20                 ` webmaster
2019-09-11 18:19                   ` Austin S. Hemmelgarn
2019-09-11 20:01                     ` webmaster
2019-09-11 21:42                       ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-13  1:33                         ` General Zed
2019-09-11 21:37                     ` webmaster
2019-09-12 11:31                       ` Austin S. Hemmelgarn
2019-09-12 19:18                         ` webmaster
2019-09-12 19:44                           ` Chris Murphy
2019-09-12 21:34                             ` General Zed
2019-09-12 22:28                               ` Chris Murphy
2019-09-12 22:57                                 ` General Zed
2019-09-12 23:54                                   ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-13  0:26                                     ` General Zed
2019-09-13  3:12                                       ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-13  5:05                                         ` General Zed
2019-09-14  0:56                                           ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-14  1:50                                             ` General Zed
2019-09-14  4:42                                               ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-14  4:53                                                 ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-15 17:54                                                 ` General Zed
2019-09-16 22:51                                                   ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-17  1:03                                                     ` General Zed
2019-09-17  1:34                                                       ` General Zed
2019-09-17  1:44                                                       ` Chris Murphy
2019-09-17  4:55                                                         ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-17  4:19                                                       ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-17  3:10                                                     ` General Zed
2019-09-17  4:05                                                       ` General Zed
2019-09-14  1:56                                             ` General Zed
2019-09-13  5:22                                         ` General Zed
2019-09-13  6:16                                         ` General Zed
2019-09-13  6:58                                         ` General Zed
2019-09-13  9:25                                           ` General Zed
2019-09-13 17:02                                             ` General Zed
2019-09-14  0:59                                             ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-14  1:28                                               ` General Zed
2019-09-14  4:28                                                 ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-15 18:05                                                   ` General Zed
2019-09-16 23:05                                                     ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-13  7:51                                         ` General Zed
2019-09-13 11:04                                     ` Austin S. Hemmelgarn
2019-09-13 20:43                                       ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-14  0:20                                         ` General Zed
2019-09-14 18:29                                       ` Chris Murphy
2019-09-14 23:39                                         ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-13 11:09                                   ` Austin S. Hemmelgarn
2019-09-13 17:20                                     ` General Zed
2019-09-13 18:20                                       ` General Zed
2019-09-12 19:54                           ` Austin S. Hemmelgarn
2019-09-12 22:21                             ` General Zed
2019-09-13 11:53                               ` Austin S. Hemmelgarn
2019-09-13 16:54                                 ` General Zed
2019-09-13 18:29                                   ` Austin S. Hemmelgarn
2019-09-13 19:40                                     ` General Zed
2019-09-14 15:10                                       ` Jukka Larja
2019-09-12 22:47                             ` General Zed
2019-09-11 21:37                   ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-11 23:21                     ` webmaster
2019-09-12  0:10                       ` Remi Gauvin
2019-09-12  3:05                         ` webmaster
2019-09-12  3:30                           ` Remi Gauvin
2019-09-12  3:33                             ` Remi Gauvin
2019-09-12  5:19                       ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-12 21:23                         ` General Zed [this message]
2019-09-14  4:12                           ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-16 11:42                             ` General Zed
2019-09-17  0:49                               ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-17  2:30                                 ` General Zed
2019-09-17  5:30                                   ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-17 10:07                                     ` General Zed
2019-09-17 23:40                                       ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-18  4:37                                         ` General Zed
2019-09-18 18:00                                           ` Zygo Blaxell
2019-09-10 23:58             ` webmaster
2019-09-09 23:24         ` Qu Wenruo
2019-09-09 23:25         ` webmaster
2019-09-09 16:38       ` webmaster
2019-09-09 23:44         ` Qu Wenruo
2019-09-10  0:00           ` Chris Murphy
2019-09-10  0:51             ` Qu Wenruo
2019-09-10  0:06           ` webmaster
2019-09-10  0:48             ` Qu Wenruo
2019-09-10  1:24               ` webmaster
2019-09-10  1:48                 ` Qu Wenruo
2019-09-10  3:32                   ` webmaster
2019-09-10 14:14                     ` Nikolay Borisov
2019-09-10 22:35                       ` webmaster
2019-09-11  6:40                         ` Nikolay Borisov
2019-09-10 22:48                     ` webmaster
2019-09-10 23:14                   ` webmaster
2019-09-11  0:26               ` webmaster
2019-09-11  0:36                 ` webmaster
2019-09-11  1:00                 ` webmaster
2019-09-10 11:12     ` Austin S. Hemmelgarn
2019-09-09  3:12 webmaster

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