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* [PATCH v2] trace-cmd: Add CODING_STYLE and CONTRIBUTE documents
@ 2021-04-06 15:37 Steven Rostedt
  2021-04-06 15:38 ` Steven Rostedt
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 2+ messages in thread
From: Steven Rostedt @ 2021-04-06 15:37 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Linux Trace Devel; +Cc: Sameeruddin shaik

From: "Steven Rostedt (VMware)" <rostedt@goodmis.org>

Add a CODING_STYLE document that describes the expected style of the code
as well as a CONTRIBUTE document that explains how a new comer can
contribute to the project.

Signed-off-by: Steven Rostedt (VMware) <rostedt@goodmis.org>
---
 CODING_STYLE | 287 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 CONTRIBUTE   | 103 ++++++++++++++++++
 2 files changed, 390 insertions(+)
 create mode 100644 CODING_STYLE
 create mode 100644 CONTRIBUTE

diff --git a/CODING_STYLE b/CODING_STYLE
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..24fb10ec
--- /dev/null
+++ b/CODING_STYLE
@@ -0,0 +1,287 @@
+
+trace-cmd coding-style
+======================
+
+The coding style of trace-cmd and the tracing libraries (libtracefs and
+libtraceevent) are very similar to the Linux kernel coding style:
+
+  https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/tree/Documentation/process/coding-style.rst
+
+Indentation
+===========
+
+Tabs are used for the start of indentation (the '\t' character), and should be
+set to 8 characters. Spaces may be used at the end for continued lines where
+having the start of text line up to braces in the previous line is not
+divisible by 8.
+
+Max line width
+==============
+
+All lines should not be more than 100 characters in length.
+
+This is a guide, as readability is more important than breaking lines up into a
+hard limit. Ideally, strings should never be broken up except for where a new
+line is added.
+
+	printf("This is a line that may continue for a very long string.\n"
+	       "This is another line, but after a new line\n");
+
+But line breaks should not be:
+
+	printf("This is a line that may continue for a very"
+	       "long string.\n This is another line,"
+	       "but after a new line\n");
+
+Not only is the above not as readable as the first version, it is not
+even equivalent, because it is missing spaces between the line breaks.
+For this reason, finish the string on the same line, even if that string
+breaks the 100 character limit.
+
+Brackets and braces
+===================
+
+For all conditionals, the braces start on the same line:
+
+	if (cond) {
+	}
+
+And the ending brace is at the same indentation as the conditional.
+
+	while (cond) {
+	}
+
+	do {
+	} while (cond);
+
+	for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
+	}
+
+The same is true for structures:
+
+	struct my_struct {
+		int field;
+	};
+
+But for functions, the braces should start on the following line:
+
+	void my_function(void)
+	{
+	}
+
+
+It is also fine to not use braces for simple conditionals and loops.
+
+	if (!x)
+		y = x;
+	else
+		y = 1;
+
+	for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
+		foo(i);
+
+	while (getline(&line, &size, fp) > 0)
+		printf("%s", line);
+
+But any complex or multiline conditional or loop should have braces even if it
+is allowed not to by the C language.
+
+	if (x) {
+		for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
+			foo(i);
+	} else {
+		foo(1);
+	}
+
+Notice above that even though the else portion is simple, it too has braces as
+the else and if blocks should match. If one is required to have braces, they
+both should have braces.
+
+
+Spaces
+======
+
+A single space should be used between C commands and their starting
+parenthesis.
+
+	if (x)
+	for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
+	while (getline(&line, &size, fp) > 0)
+
+There should be no space between function or macros and the starting
+parenthesis.
+
+	foo(x)
+	IS_VALID(y)
+
+This includes prototypes and declarations.
+
+	void foo(int x)
+
+A space should be before and after assignment, comparison and algorithmic
+signs.
+
+	i = 0;
+	if (i < 10)
+	if (i == 5)
+
+	y = i + 10;
+
+	i += 5;
+
+For structures, use tabs to make all the fields line up nicely.
+
+	struct {
+		int			foo;
+		int			bar;
+		unsigned long long	time;
+	};
+
+Variable declarations
+=====================
+
+The order of variables that are declared, should first keep the same types
+together, but also should be ordered by their length such that the variables
+are ordered in an "upside-down Christmas tree" fashion where the length gets
+smaller.
+
+	int tracecmd_count_cpus(void)
+	{
+		static int once;
+		char buf[1024];
+		int cpus = 0;
+		char *pbuf;
+		size_t *pn;
+		FILE *fp;
+		size_t n;
+		int r;
+
+The above shows that the order is done by length, and in the above example it
+also shows that "int cpu = 0;" is not grouped next to "int r;". As this is more
+of a guideline and made to be more aesthetic to the eye of the reader, both the
+above and is acceptable as below.
+
+	int tracecmd_count_cpus(void)
+	{
+		static int once;
+		char buf[1024];
+		char *pbuf;
+		size_t *pn;
+		FILE *fp;
+		size_t n;
+		int cpus = 0;
+		int r;
+
+
+Unless variables are tightly related, it is expected that each variable be on
+its own line and not grouped by type. That is,
+
+		int r, cpus = 0;
+
+is to be discouraged, as the two variables are not related to each other.
+But if you had a bunch of counters:
+
+		int i, j, k;
+
+That would be fine, as the variables are all related as they are all for the
+same purpose (arbitrary counters). The same may go with pointers;
+
+
+	char *begin, *end;
+
+Comments
+========
+
+Comments will use the "/* */" format and the C++ "//" style is discouraged.
+If a comment is on one line, keep the "/*" and "*/" on the same line:
+
+	/* This is a single line comment. */
+
+If a comment spans more than one line, then have the "/*" on a separate line
+before the comment and the "*/" on a separate line at the end of the comment,
+and each line starts with a "*" where all the "*" line up with each other.
+
+	/*
+	 * This is a multi line comment, where all the '*'
+	 * will line up, and the text is on a separate line
+	 * as the start and end markers.
+	 */
+
+
+Function documentation
+======================
+
+All global functions (and especially any APIs) should have a function
+description in the form of "kernel doc":
+
+  https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/doc-guide/kernel-doc.html
+
+The form is:
+
+  /**
+   * function_name() - Brief description of function.
+   * @arg1: Describe the first argument.
+   * @arg2: Describe the second argument.
+   *        One can provide multiple line descriptions
+   *        for arguments.
+   *
+   * A longer description, with more discussion of the function function_name()
+   * that might be useful to those using or modifying it. Begins with an
+   * empty comment line, and may include additional embedded empty
+   * comment lines.
+   *
+   * The longer description may have multiple paragraphs.
+   *
+   * Context: Describes whether the function can sleep, what locks it takes,
+   *          releases, or expects to be held. It can extend over multiple
+   *          lines.
+   * Return: Describe the return value of function_name.
+   *
+   * The return value description can also have multiple paragraphs, and should
+   * be placed at the end of the comment block.
+   */
+
+Structure layout
+================
+
+This is more about compaction than coding style. When creating structures, be
+aware that if the fields are placed together without being sized by alignment,
+that the compiler will create "holes" in them.
+
+	struct {
+		int			x;
+		char			y;
+		unsigned long long	f;
+	};
+
+As int is 4 bytes in length, char is one byte, and unsigned long long is 8
+bytes. The compiler will try to naturally align them by their size, and will
+include padding (holes) inside the structure to do so. The above is equivalent
+to:
+
+	struct {
+		int			x;
+		char			y;
+		char			padding[3];
+		unsigned long long	f;
+	};
+
+It is best to try to organize the structure where there are no holes within
+them.
+
+	struct {
+		unsigned long long	f;
+		int			x;
+		char			y;
+	};
+
+The above is better formatting, even if there may be padding outside the
+structure, but the compiler will still have more flexibility to utilize the
+space outside the structure than what it can do within it.
+
+General
+=======
+
+As stated, this is a guide and may not be strictly enforced. The goal is to
+have consistent and readable code. In general, try to have the coding style
+match the surrounding code.
diff --git a/CONTRIBUTE b/CONTRIBUTE
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..aed78110
--- /dev/null
+++ b/CONTRIBUTE
@@ -0,0 +1,103 @@
+If you like to become part of the community and submit patches, here's how
+to do so for trace-cmd.
+
+If you only want to report a bug, or suggest an enhancement, you may do
+so at:
+
+  https://bugzilla.kernel.org/buglist.cgi?component=Trace-cmd%2FKernelshark
+
+All development is done via a mailing list:
+
+   http://vger.kernel.org/vger-lists.html#linux-trace-devel
+
+Patches should be sent to linux-trace-devel@vger.kernel.org
+
+Start by cloning the official repository:
+
+  git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/utils/trace-cmd/trace-cmd.git
+
+Make your changes. When you are satisfied with them, commit them into git.
+Here's some helpful hints for your git commits.
+
+1) When making changes, please follow the coding style defined by the file
+   called CODING_STYLE in this directory.
+
+2) Every commit should only do one thing.
+   That is, if your work requires some cleaning up of code, do that
+   clean up as a separate commit and not with your functional changes.
+   Find ways to take "steps" in modifying code. If you can break up
+   your changes in a series of steps, do so.
+
+3) The commit log should start with a title. Like the below
+
+      trace-cmd: Add CONTRIBUTE file
+
+   Even though this repo is for trace-cmd, start the topic with
+   "trace-cmd:" because the commits will end up as patches to a mailing
+   list that handles other tracing repos, differentiating them with the subject
+   is useful. You can be more specific as well. If the change only affects the
+   "record" command, you may start the title with "trace-cmd record:".
+
+4) The body of the commit (with a blank line from the title), should be self
+   contained, and explain why you are making the change. The title should hold
+   the "what" is changing, but the body contains the rationale for the change.
+   It should be a stand alone, and not state things like "See the next patch",
+   because when it is in git history, there's no knowing what the next patch
+   is.  You can make statements like "This is needed for a <future-feature>
+   that will come later". Where "<future-feature>" is something that you are
+   working on and the current commit is one of the steps required to get there.
+
+5) Add your Developer Certificate of Origin (DCO) at the bottom of the commit
+   log. That is "Signed-off-by: Full Name <email>" where your full name is your
+   real name (no pseudonyms). Optionally, if you are making the change on
+   behalf of your company, you may also add your company name, if you are not
+   using your company's email. "Signed-off-by: Full Name (Company) <email>".
+   Please note, the DCO is your statement that you have the legal right to
+   make these changes for the project you are submitting to.
+
+You can use the Linux kernel "checkpatch.pl" script to help verify the formatting
+of your patch:
+
+  https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/tree/scripts/checkpatch.pl
+
+Please note that checkpatch.pl is a guide and not a hard rule. If it reports a
+fix that makes the code harder to read, that fix can probably be ignored.
+
+  git format-patch --stdout HEAD~1..HEAD | ./checkpatch.pl
+
+Finally, you can use the git "send-email" functionality:
+
+  git --send-email --from='<your-email> --to='linux-trace-devel@vger.kernel.org' HEAD~1..HEAD
+
+If you are sending one patch, if you are adding more than one patch, also include
+a cover letter:
+
+  git --send-email --cover-letter --annotate --from='<your-email> --to='linux-trace-devel@vger.kernel.org' <first-commit>~1..HEAD
+
+If you receive feedback on your patches, and plan on sending another version,
+please use the '-v' option to mark your patches that they are a new version.
+For example, if you add "-v2" to the above commands, instead of having:
+"[PATCH]" in the subject, it will have "[PATCH v2]", letting the reviewers know
+that this is a new version. If you send another version, use "-v3" and so on.
+
+For more information about git --send-email:
+
+  https://git-scm.com/docs/git-send-email
+
+To keep track of the status of patches that have been submitted, check out:
+
+  https://patchwork.kernel.org/project/linux-trace-devel/list/
+
+If you would like to apply patches from the mailing list, you can use
+the "b4" utility.
+
+ $ pip install b4
+
+Then from the mailing list archive, find a message id from a patch or patch
+series. For example, to get the patch from:
+
+  https://lore.kernel.org/linux-trace-devel/20210205173713.132051-1-tz.stoyanov@gmail.com/
+
+ $ b4 am -o - 20210205173713.132051-1-tz.stoyanov@gmail.com > /tmp/p.mbox
+ $ git am /tmp/p.mbox
+
-- 
2.29.2


^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 2+ messages in thread

* Re: [PATCH v2] trace-cmd: Add CODING_STYLE and CONTRIBUTE documents
  2021-04-06 15:37 [PATCH v2] trace-cmd: Add CODING_STYLE and CONTRIBUTE documents Steven Rostedt
@ 2021-04-06 15:38 ` Steven Rostedt
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 2+ messages in thread
From: Steven Rostedt @ 2021-04-06 15:38 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Linux Trace Devel; +Cc: Sameeruddin shaik


Here's the diff from v1:

diff --git a/CODING_STYLE b/CODING_STYLE
index 6aff138e..24fb10ec 100644
--- a/CODING_STYLE
+++ b/CODING_STYLE
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
 trace-cmd coding-style
 ======================
 
-The coding style of trace-cmd and the tracing librariers (libtracefs and
+The coding style of trace-cmd and the tracing libraries (libtracefs and
 libtraceevent) are very similar to the Linux kernel coding style:
 
   https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/tree/Documentation/process/coding-style.rst
@@ -18,6 +18,8 @@ divisible by 8.
 Max line width
 ==============
 
+All lines should not be more than 100 characters in length.
+
 This is a guide, as readability is more important than breaking lines up into a
 hard limit. Ideally, strings should never be broken up except for where a new
 line is added.
@@ -33,10 +35,11 @@ But line breaks should not be:
 
 Not only is the above not as readable as the first version, it is not
 even equivalent, because it is missing spaces between the line breaks.
-For this reason, finish the string on the same line.
+For this reason, finish the string on the same line, even if that string
+breaks the 100 character limit.
 
-Brackets and baces
-==================
+Brackets and braces
+===================
 
 For all conditionals, the braces start on the same line:
 
@@ -60,13 +63,80 @@ The same is true for structures:
 		int field;
 	};
 
-But for functions, the baces should start on the following line:
+But for functions, the braces should start on the following line:
 
 	void my_function(void)
 	{
 	}
 
 
+It is also fine to not use braces for simple conditionals and loops.
+
+	if (!x)
+		y = x;
+	else
+		y = 1;
+
+	for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
+		foo(i);
+
+	while (getline(&line, &size, fp) > 0)
+		printf("%s", line);
+
+But any complex or multiline conditional or loop should have braces even if it
+is allowed not to by the C language.
+
+	if (x) {
+		for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
+			foo(i);
+	} else {
+		foo(1);
+	}
+
+Notice above that even though the else portion is simple, it too has braces as
+the else and if blocks should match. If one is required to have braces, they
+both should have braces.
+
+
+Spaces
+======
+
+A single space should be used between C commands and their starting
+parenthesis.
+
+	if (x)
+	for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
+	while (getline(&line, &size, fp) > 0)
+
+There should be no space between function or macros and the starting
+parenthesis.
+
+	foo(x)
+	IS_VALID(y)
+
+This includes prototypes and declarations.
+
+	void foo(int x)
+
+A space should be before and after assignment, comparison and algorithmic
+signs.
+
+	i = 0;
+	if (i < 10)
+	if (i == 5)
+
+	y = i + 10;
+
+	i += 5;
+
+For structures, use tabs to make all the fields line up nicely.
+
+	struct {
+		int			foo;
+		int			bar;
+		unsigned long long	time;
+	};
+
 Variable declarations
 =====================
 
@@ -171,6 +241,44 @@ The form is:
    * be placed at the end of the comment block.
    */
 
+Structure layout
+================
+
+This is more about compaction than coding style. When creating structures, be
+aware that if the fields are placed together without being sized by alignment,
+that the compiler will create "holes" in them.
+
+	struct {
+		int			x;
+		char			y;
+		unsigned long long	f;
+	};
+
+As int is 4 bytes in length, char is one byte, and unsigned long long is 8
+bytes. The compiler will try to naturally align them by their size, and will
+include padding (holes) inside the structure to do so. The above is equivalent
+to:
+
+	struct {
+		int			x;
+		char			y;
+		char			padding[3];
+		unsigned long long	f;
+	};
+
+It is best to try to organize the structure where there are no holes within
+them.
+
+	struct {
+		unsigned long long	f;
+		int			x;
+		char			y;
+	};
+
+The above is better formatting, even if there may be padding outside the
+structure, but the compiler will still have more flexibility to utilize the
+space outside the structure than what it can do within it.
+
 General
 =======
 
diff --git a/CONTRIBUTE b/CONTRIBUTE
index f03d00d8..aed78110 100644
--- a/CONTRIBUTE
+++ b/CONTRIBUTE
@@ -55,6 +55,16 @@ Here's some helpful hints for your git commits.
    Please note, the DCO is your statement that you have the legal right to
    make these changes for the project you are submitting to.
 
+You can use the Linux kernel "checkpatch.pl" script to help verify the formatting
+of your patch:
+
+  https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/tree/scripts/checkpatch.pl
+
+Please note that checkpatch.pl is a guide and not a hard rule. If it reports a
+fix that makes the code harder to read, that fix can probably be ignored.
+
+  git format-patch --stdout HEAD~1..HEAD | ./checkpatch.pl
+
 Finally, you can use the git "send-email" functionality:
 
   git --send-email --from='<your-email> --to='linux-trace-devel@vger.kernel.org' HEAD~1..HEAD
@@ -78,3 +88,16 @@ To keep track of the status of patches that have been submitted, check out:
 
   https://patchwork.kernel.org/project/linux-trace-devel/list/
 
+If you would like to apply patches from the mailing list, you can use
+the "b4" utility.
+
+ $ pip install b4
+
+Then from the mailing list archive, find a message id from a patch or patch
+series. For example, to get the patch from:
+
+  https://lore.kernel.org/linux-trace-devel/20210205173713.132051-1-tz.stoyanov@gmail.com/
+
+ $ b4 am -o - 20210205173713.132051-1-tz.stoyanov@gmail.com > /tmp/p.mbox
+ $ git am /tmp/p.mbox
+

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 2+ messages in thread

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2021-04-06 15:37 [PATCH v2] trace-cmd: Add CODING_STYLE and CONTRIBUTE documents Steven Rostedt
2021-04-06 15:38 ` Steven Rostedt

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